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Old 07-16-2015, 11:17 AM   #5261
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a mother calls the police for help with her son. the son dies of a heart attack.

Breaking: Protests in Denver After Surveillance Video of Shooting Shows Police Lied | Alternative

Quote:
Sunday night police in Denver shot a man after claiming he charged at them with a knife. Witnesses at the time disputed that claim. Now surveillance footage from a nearby business supports the witnesses over the police version. Instead of charging toward the officers, the video shows Paul Castaway holding the knife to his own throat the entire time.

...

Additionally, police originally claimed that Castaway had stabbed his mother and that she had been taken to the hospital with injuries, as a result. They later revised that to him having threatened her and caused minor injuries to her neck. Witnesses once again dispute that, stating she has no injuries at all. Rick Morado, Castaway’s cousin, contends that he was really just trying to get away and not attacking the police. As has often been the case in past police shootings, Castaway’s mother now says she regrets calling the police.

Quote:
She can’t help but regret calling police Sunday–after her son, Paul Castaway, threatened her with a knife at her home.

He didn’t stab me in the neck. He was drunk. I told the cops he was mentally ill. He was schizophrenic. I called for help. I didn’t call for them to kill him,” she said.
...
video of murder in link.
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Old 07-16-2015, 11:21 AM   #5262
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a cop locks another cop in a box and turns off the A/C. the cop suffers a heart attack and dies.

https://www.odmp.org/k9/1557-k9-nitro

Quote:
K9 Nitro died of heat exhaustion after the air conditioner unit in the patrol car malfunctioned as outside temperatures reached 106 degrees.

Nitro had just apprehended a subject who fled during a warrant service in the 8600 block of Santa Paula Way. His handler placed him back in their patrol vehicle and then returned to assist the other officers. His handler returned to the vehicle approximately 15 minutes later and discovered that Nitro was in distress. He transported Nitro to a nearby veterinary clinic, but he died a short time later.

It was determined that the patrol car's air conditioner malfunctioned and stopped working.
cops will even cover up the murders of fellow police officers.
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Old 07-16-2015, 11:27 AM   #5263
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a mt.net member reads post #5262...he thinks it's just an honest mistake and doesn't happen often.

this happened the prior week:

Quote:
K9 Hector and K9 Jimmy died of heat exhaustion after accidentally being left in their handler's vehicle following his shift and a callout to assist a neighboring agency.

Their handler had completed his midnight shift when the other agency requested Jimmy to conduct a track of a critically missing person. Following the search the handler returned home. Approximately nine hour later he discovered that Hector and Jimmy had been left in the back of the department vehicle and were both deceased.
https://www.odmp.org/k9/1555-k9-hector

Honestly, if I locked my dog/cat/kid in a car I'd be charged with a crime. Here an officer murdered two other police officers and he just gets to add them to his kill list.
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Old 07-16-2015, 11:36 AM   #5264
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man, **** you.

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Old 07-16-2015, 11:40 AM   #5265
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Update:


Quote:
The North Florida Chief Circuit Judge who issued an unconstitutional order barring citizens from video recording the outside of a Jacksonville courthouse, prompting national criticism along with a federal lawsuit from PINAC, has rescinded his order.

Fourth Circuit Chief Judge Mark Mahon rescinded his order Wednesday, two days after a former Jacksonville judge from the same circuit agreed to join PINAC in its lawsuit, further embarrassing the rookie chief judge among his peers.

In his latest order, Mahon explains that he issued the initial order banning photography and protests outside the courthouse in order to ensure “a fair trial” for defendants that he does not name.
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Old 07-16-2015, 11:52 AM   #5266
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A long read about why NY is a horrible place.

How a '50s-Era New York Knife Law Has Landed Thousands in Jail | Village Voice

Quote:
For years, New York's gravity-knife law has been formally opposed by a broad swath of the legal community. Elected officials call the statute "flawed" and "unfair." Defense attorneys call it "outrageous" and "ridiculous" -- or worse. Labor unions, which have seen a parade of members arrested for tools they use on the job, say the law is woefully outdated. Even the Office of Court Administration -- the official body of the New York State judiciary -- says the law is unjustly enforced and needs to change. They've petitioned the legislature to do just that.

...

Law enforcement agencies don't track gravity-knife crimes as a class, which may explain why the frequency of those arrests has gone largely unreported in the news media. But a Village Voice analysis of data from several sources suggests there have been as many as 60,000 gravity-knife prosecutions over the past decade, and that the rate has more than doubled in that time. If those estimates are correct, it's enough to place gravity-knife offenses among the top 10 most prosecuted crimes in New York City.

The increase seems to be the result of a confluence of forces. Changes in knife design have played a part, as modern features have nudged the most popular styles closer to the edge of the legal definition. But the NYPD's stop-and-frisk program also may be one driver. A prime rationale for the policy has always been weapon recovery; former NYPD commissioner Ray Kelly put that goal front and center in a 2013 Wall Street Journal op-ed, pointing out that stop-and-frisk had "taken tens of thousands of weapons off the street" over the previous decade.

But about 80 percent of weapons recovered under stop-and-frisk were knives, according to an analysis of the department's own statistics. And experts say the vast majority of those were likely misclassified as "gravity knives." Whether deliberate or not, dramatically expanding the definition of an illegal knife has not only landed thousands of innocent people in jail -- it also had the effect of making stop-and-frisk appear far more effective than it actually was.



Prosecutions under the law that bans gravity knives have increased significantly over the past decade, a rise that largely tracks the increasing numbers of stop-and-frisk encounters through 2011.

...

Gravity-knife arrests may be popular for another reason. Most, like Neal's, result from simple observation of a "pocket clip," often readily visible. All officers need to do is keep their eyes peeled, and they can add another misdemeanor to their tally -- or, if they're lucky, a felony.

Matt Galluzzo, a former assistant district attorney in Manhattan, now a defense attorney in private practice, says that for many officers, a gravity-knife arrest is simply a hard collar to pass up. "You don't have to fight the guy, you don't have to chase him," Galluzzo says. "It's an easy way to make an arrest. And they're under pressure to make arrests." A poster on Officer.com, a verified online message board for law enforcement officers, put it bluntly in 2013 when he advised a rookie to be on the lookout for "GKs": "make sure they have a prior conviction so you can bump it up to that felony!!!"

...

Even worse, critics charge, is that officials have prosecuted knife users aggressively while doing little to address the source of those same knives, which are sold openly at reputable retailers all over the city. New York State assemblyman Dan Quart, a Democrat from Manhattan, says there's an obvious contradiction at play: "You can walk in and purchase one of these knives over the counter," he says, "and then walk out and get arrested."


Cases like Neal's that result in long prison sentences are unusual. But thousands end up in handcuffs every year. Of the dozens of cases examined by the Voice, few involved instances of violence and most saw individuals arrested for possessing a knife they used for work. Since 2003, knife-carrying maintenance workers, plumbers, coffee-shop employees -- even a Bible-camp counselor -- have landed in jail.

...

Nate Appleman, a food-world heavyweight and contestant on The Next Iron Chef a few years back, was arrested on account of the pocketknife he uses to open cardboard boxes. Professional photographer Steven Counts had never been in trouble with the law -- not even so much as a speeding ticket -- when he was surrounded by five officers in downtown Manhattan last summer. Counts was on his way to lunch when one of them spotted, on the pocket of his jeans, the clip for a knife he uses to construct studio backdrops. Stagehands are so frequently targeted that the major union representing them started publishing legal advice about pocketknives in its monthly newsletter.

...

Carla Glaser, 47, who served as a juror on a gravity-knife case in Manhattan, calls the situation "ludicrous." She still feels sick about the conviction she was compelled to hand out, to a man who was initially stopped by police for being in a city park after nightfall. Although the law was, in her view, deeply flawed, she felt she had no choice but to vote with the majority. Glaser herself carries a Swiss Army knife on her keychain.

"It just seemed like a trumped-up charge," she says. "And it certainly doesn't seem like it's enforced equally across the board."



...

The original gravity knife -- the type legislators targeted when they banned them half a century ago -- bears no resemblance to the kind that landed Richard Neal and thousands of others in jail over the last decade. Developed by the German military for use by paratroopers during World War II, the idea behind a gravity knife was simple: An unlucky parachutist who found himself in a tight spot -- tangled in a tree, for example -- would be able to access the knife even with injuries or limited mobility. Simply press a button and the blade would literally fall out of the handle and lock in place.

...By the 1950s they had become the stuff of nightmares, closely associated with inner-city youth gangs, thanks in part to films like Rebel Without a Cause and Blackboard Jungle, which ends in a classroom brawl between a badly outnumbered public school teacher and his crazed, switchblade-wielding students.
...

Even though they were nearly identical in design, gravity knives lacked a spring, a key characteristic of the newly illegal switchblades. So manufacturers stuck with warehouses full of worthless knives simply removed the springs and went on selling, calling the new products "gravity knives."

Finally, in 1958, the federal government banned the importation and interstate transport of both switchblades and gravity knives. The prohibition effectively killed the domestic market, and after that, true gravity knives largely vanished from store shelves.

...

Under Penal Law 265.01, a gravity knife is defined as any knife that opens with "the force of gravity or the application of centrifugal force" and has a blade that locks into place by means of a "button, spring, lever, or other device."

Courts have interpreted that to mean that any knife that can be opened with a "wrist flick" -- a movement something like what a fan dancer might do -- qualifies as a gravity knife. A long list of court cases have turned on exactly that question, which seems straightforward enough.

The problem, Robrish came to realize, is that with enough force, and enough practice, virtually any pocketknife can be flicked open like a "gravity knife," whether it was designed to operate that way or not.

"A person might have one of these knives, and they've never in their lives tried to open it that way," Robrish says. "They have no idea that it does open that way."

Jim Furgal, a former knife-industry representative who frequently testifies as an expert witness at gravity-knife trials, said the language of the statute is part of the problem. But changes in knife design have also exacerbated the issue.

In the 1960s, most pocketknives looked like the classic Swiss Army variety, Furgal explains. They were designed to be opened with two hands, typically by means of a small fingernail indent on the blade. On two-handed knives like those, the spring pressure holding the blade in the closed position is considerable. Even with a vigorous flick, it won't open.

But beginning in the mid-1990s, more and more companies began designing their knives to open with only one hand. Most models of this type have a small "thumb stud" on the blade for just this purpose. It's a convenience feature, Furgal explains, so the user can keep one hand free for other tasks.

But that design change had an unfortunate side effect. For a blade to easily open with one hand, the spring pressure holding the blade in the closed position has to be relatively light. That reduced tension makes such knives far easier to "flick."

Simple wear-and-tear compounds the problem, Robrish found. After years of use, the hinge of a knife has a tendency to loosen up; a knife that was perfectly legal when it was purchased could actually become illegal over time. A quarter-turn of a screw is all it takes for a worn-out knife to become a potential felony.

...


the article keeps going and going and going...
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Old 07-16-2015, 12:24 PM   #5267
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I find it interesting that the author of the article linked to displays his ignorance of the law by stating "It's as if authorities in New York City were using an antiquated law against flintlock muskets to prosecute BB-gun owners."

BB guns are, of course, prohibited in NYC. However they have their own specific regulation, under New York City Administrative Code 10-131, section b:

Quote:
Air pistols and air rifles; selling or possessing. 1. It shall be unlawful for any person to sell, offer to sell or have in such person's possession any air pistol or air rifle or similar instrument in which the propelling force is a spring or air, except that the sale of such instruments if accompanied by delivery to a point without the city, and possession for such purpose, shall not be unlawful if such per son shall have secured an annual license from the police commissioner of the city authorizing such sale and possession. The sale and delivery of such instruments within the city from one licensee to another licensee, and the use of such instruments in connection with an amusement licensed by the department of consumer affairs or at rifle or pistol ranges duly authorized by law shall not be considered a violation of this subdivision.
I don't know why people find it so difficult to obey the law, or complain so loudly when they get caught knowingly violating it...



A short read about why NYC is a great place:

We have an astoundingly low rate of violent crime. Less than half that of cities such as Baltimore, Cleveland, Kansas City, Atlanta, DC, St. Louis, Memphis, Chicago, Indianapolis, Milwaukee, etc. And that's all violent crimes combined. If you look at the murder rate, we're 1/10th of Detroit and New Orleans, 1/4 of Philadelphia and Newark, etc. Same holds for rape and robbery as well.

We have clean streets, reliable trains, a booming economy, and the best dining in the western hemisphere. If the price we have to pay for that is that our police actually enforce the law and a few thugs and minor criminals are deprived of leniency, I've got no problem with that whatsoever. I'll keep on carrying the same folding pocketknife I've had for years.
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Old 07-16-2015, 03:20 PM   #5268
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a cop ecorts a handcuffed 100lb. girl into the ground...he claims he's the victim.




Quote:
n November 2013, officer Tyler Walker and several other officers were dispatched to a residence over reports of a gun. The officers found no probable cause, but they did encounter an inebriated 18-year-old girl, Alexis Acker.

According to reports, Acker was “intoxicated and verbally uncooperative with police,” and became “physically combative” when officers arrested her boyfriend on an unrelated warrant.

Their claims of Acker being “physically combative,” however, hold very little water after reading their report of what was caught on a hospital surveillance camera. The video, obtained by the Colorado Springs Independent, was just discovered as a part of an in-depth report looking into the issue of police brutality.

Acker was arrested on charges of resisting arrest and assault on a police officer.

...

At the beginning of the video, we see Walker escorting in the 100 lb girl into the hospital without incident. Acker appears to be compliant, but she apparently took too long to sit down after being told to sit down.

Walker proceeded to give her a little encouragement to sit down and shoved her into the chair with apparent excessive force. As a natural reaction to being attacked while handcuffed, Acker kicked her leg out.

...After suffering a foot to his pant leg, Walker punched Acker in the chest. He then grabbed the tiny, handcuffed, and inebriated teen and body slammed her face first onto the hospital floor, injuring her neck and knocking out her teeth.

In one report, police claim that Walker “rolled her out of the chair to the floor.” In another report, police claim that Walker “escorted Ms. Acker to the floor.” Watch the video below and decide for yourself if either these reports are accurate.

....

Because Walker injured himself while body slamming the teen, he was advised of his rights as the victim by CSPD. The department refuses to say whether or not Walker faced any discipline for his actions. He remains on regular duty.

In the meantime, it will be the taxpayers of Colorado Springs who will foot the potential $500,000 bill for the lawsuit on Acker’s behalf.
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Old 07-16-2015, 03:29 PM   #5269
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True story:

I look slightly "ethnic."

My features would be best described as "Mediterranean," however I could pass for a light-skinned Saudi pretty easily.


(picture of Kamal Bahamdan)



About an hour ago, I went to Home Depot to pick up a bunch of electrical connectors, fittings, etc.




(The Home Depot on 59th & 3rd is two stories underground, and the street-level entrance is about what you'd expect for a hardware store in midtown Manhattan. It's pretty cool.)



I brought with me an old canvas shoulder-bag which I keep at the office for such purposes. To get there, I took the subway (as one does), entering at Grand Central and exiting at 59th st.


(This is a relatively empty subway car.)




After picking up my stuff, I returned to the office via the reverse route, my bag now stuffed full and quite heavy.





From time to time, the NYPD conduct "random" searches of bags on the subway system, principally at the larger stations, such as Times Square and Grand Central.





Today, as I exited the train and headed towards the stairs back up to the main level of Grand Central, two NYPD officers asked if they could inspect my somewhat suspicious-looking but entirely innocent bag. I told them to go **** themselves happily complied, after which they tazed me, handcuffed me, kicked me a few times and arrested me for resisting arrest made a cursory inspection of the bag's contents and then sent me upon my way with a smile and a "thank you, sir." All told, I now have three broken ribs, seventeen stitches in my face, an arrest record and am thus far out over $6,000 in attorney's fees lost about 45 seconds of my life which I'll never get back, but it's a sacrifice which I'll use to make myself look like an innocent victim of a totalitarian police state happily make in order to keep the greatest city on earth a safe place to live and work.
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Old 07-16-2015, 03:35 PM   #5270
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a cop swears an oath the uphold the constitution...he laughs.

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Old 07-16-2015, 03:43 PM   #5271
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does the NYPD think they are stopping terrorism with these random searches?

do they really think someone with an explosive is going to have them search their bag and not just walk to the next station?

do you feel safer knowing that a bunch of overpaid idiots are giving themselves busy work to justify their salary with a bunch of unrelated drug "busts"?
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Old 07-16-2015, 03:56 PM   #5272
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Braineack View Post
does the NYPD think they are solving crimes with these random searches?
I'm not sure- I've never asked them.


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do they really think someone with a bomb is going to have them search their bag?
Given that the alternative would be to be tazed, handcuffed, beaten, arrested, and then tazed again for good measure, it's difficult to say. One possible interpretation is that the highly visible presence of a large and well-equipped police force may serve as a deterrent to crimes which include (but are not limited to) the carriage of weapons or drugs through the public transit system.


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do you feel safer knowing that a bunch of overpaid idiots are giving themselves busy work to justify their salary with a bunch of unrelated drug "busts"?
Well, I do feel safer having the NYPD here, if that's what you are asking. The average total compensation for an NYPD officer (salary + pension + benefits) is around $87k per year. This is roughly the average salary for all jobs in NYC, and I consider this to be a positive thing. It allows the department to attract and retain educated, competent police officers.

Compare this to the compensation of LEOs in smaller communities in the southeast, where annual salaries can be as low as the mid $30s, and you can see why the police forces of those communities tend to be staffed by individuals who are, shall we say, slightly more west-leaning on the Herrnstein / Murray curve.

So, on the whole, yes, I am quite happy with the NYPD in pretty much all regards. I'm sure that I'd bitch about the parking enforcement division if I drove my car into the city, but I choose not to. Those people who do invite scrutiny upon themselves just as surely as people who choose to dress in clothing suggestive of gang-affiliation, adopt a belligerent tone when interacting with police offers, etc.
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Old 07-16-2015, 04:01 PM   #5273
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the alternative should be for them to tell the potential rider to walk to the next platform (since that's the ruling)...but cops will be cops :P
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Old 07-16-2015, 04:10 PM   #5274
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the alternative should be for them to tell the potential rider to walk to the next platform (since that's the ruling)...but cops will be cops :P
Huh?

Do you understand how subways work?

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Old 07-16-2015, 04:34 PM   #5275
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Also, you'll be happy to know that NYC is currently considering the decriminalization of public urination. So the police will finally be unable to deprive drunks of their liberty just for making the city a slightly less-nice place to be.
Public urination on the forefront when it comes to discussions of low-level offenses
POSTED 10:42 PM, JULY 15, 2015, BY JAY DOW


http://player.ooyala.com/iframe.js#p...8DG42qQyLWkYHZ
(I still can't embed Ooyala videos.)

CORONA, Queens — You might think public urination is someone else’s problem, until someone does it in front of your house.

Imagine how we felt after we caught a man relieving himself first on our PIX11 microwave truck, and then on the street.

The topic stinks, really.

But public urination is now being poured into the ongoing debate over whether it’s time to decriminalize that, and other low-level offenses that currently lead to fines, a court appearance, if not an arrest.

Both Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner Bill Bratton are on the same page, saying urinating in public is simply not allowed.

“A number of the initiatives that have been put forward – whether it’s fare evasion, public urination, open containers of alcohol – these are things where police need the power of the criminal law to effectively stop and deal with the person. But to decriminalize – I’m sorry, you just open the Pandora’s box,” said Commissioner Bratton.

In Corona Queens, this undocumented Jamaican immigrant, who we’ll call Daniel, was brave enough to admit his brush with the law.

“I was coming home drunk. And when you drunk you urinate a lot. And basically I had to take a leak at a tree, the cops. They told me not to do that anymore,” he said.

If Daniel had been ticketed, he would face either a guilty plea and a $50 fine, or a court appearance to defend himself, risking his illegal immigration status.

Local tutor Lionel Bourjolly, who works here in Corona, says based on what he sees, public urination is the end result of a bigger problem.

“The real causes are underlying. Underemployment. Unemployment. And it’s especially tough for an immigrant community – because they have fewer resources to rely on. These people have a tenuous hold on society, alright? They don’t have good jobs, they don’t’ have good housing, and they’re just trying to survive,” said Bourjolly.

We don’t want you to think the problem of people taking a classic sidewalk siesta, is just a black, brown, or working, lower class problem.

Manhattan based attorney Jason Stern says a full third of his practice involves public urination cases.

You might be surprised to hear what kind of clients he represents.

“My clientele is primarily made up of three groups. One would be out of towners – tourists, college students, and the other group is white collar professionals. Doctors, accountants, advertising executive…somebody who works on Wall Street,” said Stern.

Public urination on the forefront when it comes to discussions of low-level offenses | New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV
That last quote, from the defense attorney, is kind of interesting. His clientele is made up of three different groups: out-of-towners and white-collar professionals.

While math was not a required course in law school per se, I swear that you really do need to know how to add in order to do reasonably well on the LSAT.
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Old 07-16-2015, 06:21 PM   #5276
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Huh?

Do you understand how subways work?

if someone refuses to get searched, they should be simply asked not to ride. they can then walk to another platform, like in your case 51st street where they aren't searching bags. or jump over to the 4,5, and 6. and take one of those all the way to pick up the 7.

if someone was about to blow up the rail system (the point of the searches), wouldnt really matter what train they get on where.
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Old 07-16-2015, 07:08 PM   #5277
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How about we make a deal? I'll continue to say absolutely nothing at all about the police in Chantilly, VA if you stop pretending to know what's best for is here in NYC.
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Old 07-16-2015, 09:50 PM   #5278
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Cops hate when you dont signal when changing lanes. Penalty is death.

"After he pulled her out of the car, forced her and tossed her to the ground, knee to the neck, and arrested her," says her friend Malcom Jackson.

Road trip for suburban woman ends in jailhouse death | abc7chicago.com
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Old 07-17-2015, 08:43 AM   #5279
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Originally Posted by Joe Perez View Post
How about we make a deal? I'll continue to say absolutely nothing at all about the police in Chantilly, VA if you stop pretending to know what's best for is here in NYC.
But the entire point of those searches are to look for explosives--because it could deter terrorism. They are only allowed to look in bags that could carry explosives. They have to stop people randomly. And if someone refuses, they can leave freely--that's not RAS to search them.

If people start putting up a 4th amendment stink and yelling and causing a scene, there's a chance they could get tased and arrested for Disorderly Conduct. But I not even bring up that argument--I just think it's a useless and pointless, waste of money. And if it leads to any arrests at all, that have nothing to do with terrorism, then it's a wolf-in-wolves-clothing.

The whole exercise is pointless for its intended goal. In fact I can't any information about what sort of arrests/tickets come from the searches*, but I have learned a lot of how much money NYPD collects from riders putting their feet on the seats or falling asleep, or dancing.

It's not really about what's best for NYC, because it's not actually serving anyone. And it's not really about NYC at all, it's a much bigger picture than that...

I also question Border Patrol and TSA** checkpoints a lot here as well. Is it not that I don't know what's best for America or have a say?



*I can only find reference that no arrests were made in 2006 (not quite a year after they started the program, but they did seize contraband).

**I used to contract for TSA. We all knew it was a joke.
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Old 07-17-2015, 09:58 PM   #5280
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Remember the old guy on the little cart and the cop parked in the handicapped spot?

"Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski and Tippecanoe County Sheriff Barry Richard responded to emails and said they would look into it.
Lafayette Police Chief Patrick Flannelly had no excuses. He said that he and his department are “disappointed and embarrassed.”
“It does appear that the officer made a mistake, pulled into the parking spot didn’t see the marking on the pavement, and I think he’s pretty embarrassed as well,” Flannelly said."


Photo Catches Cop With ?Emergency Hunger? Illegally Parking In Handicapped Spot
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