If FEMA had the bicycles, would it fund Hustler's manlet bib? - Page 30 - Miata Turbo Forum -Boost cars, acquire cats.

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Old 11-11-2013, 07:37 PM   #581
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Would ride:


I will probably buy that bike in Summer 2014.
In b4 Trey changes his mind 37 times before next summer
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Old 11-11-2013, 08:06 PM   #582
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In b4 Trey changes his mind 37 times before next summer
I probably won't buy anything because I'll never feel like I've given my current bike the mileage it deserves.
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Old 11-11-2013, 08:18 PM   #583
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I love this thing:


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Old 11-12-2013, 05:48 PM   #584
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Swapped the standard Kappa Evo saddle for a Paradigm RL yesterday. My unmentionables are much happier.

That is all
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Old 11-12-2013, 07:09 PM   #585
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So, it turns out that the attractiveness of the bicycle as a daily commuting tool is in fact very slightly diminished when it's 30 degrees and snowing.

Not a lot, but some.
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Old 11-12-2013, 07:11 PM   #586
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So, it turns out that the attractiveness of the bicycle as a daily commuting tool is in fact very slightly diminished when it's 30 degrees and snowing.

Not a lot, but some.
Yeah... I totally was going to bike but remembered I dont have fenders yet. So I drove an automatic cobalt to work instead. The cheap shitty bike would have been less shameful.
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Old 11-12-2013, 07:58 PM   #587
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True cold needs no fenders, buts it's that slushy weather that wreaks havoc on chains, sprockets and paint. Nothing like the sound of a crunchy drive train from salt and gravel. Wake up in the morning and your chain looks diseased because you didn't want to rinse and apply oil and you see all the corrosion, but you say at least the bike weighs .0002grams less from acid etching. I don't like those days for any vehicle......
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Old 11-12-2013, 08:09 PM   #588
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Yeah, I'm quite glad that the Citibikes have fenders, and I've decided that Jerseybike needs them as well.


Chain maintenance... I must admit that in the past I've slacked on this. Street riding in SoCal, all you really need to do is drizzle some lube onto it from time to time. From looking around, chain cancer is obviously a common problem here.


Oh, a few words:

Back when I was shopping for the frame to build the last e-bike out of, I noted that I was going to try disc brakes. A lot of people told me this was a stupid (or, at least, un-needed) idea for various reasons.

In my experience, disc brakes have many advantages over rim brakes. They are easy to modulate, easy to adjust, and unaffected by the rim being slightly out of true. But the single most important way in which disc brakes are superior to rim brakes is this: they work just ******* fine when they're wet.

It's been so long, I'd totally forgotten how rim brakes just disappear completely the instant you blow the tiniest little bit of moisture onto them.
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Old 11-12-2013, 08:21 PM   #589
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Unsolicited recommendation. This stuff is awesome for low-maintenance chain...maintenance.

Amazon.com: Pro Gold Products ProGold ProLink Chain Lube: Sports & Outdoors Amazon.com: Pro Gold Products ProGold ProLink Chain Lube: Sports & Outdoors


I could describe various excellent properties but basically it's just magic. Every so often I drip some on a rag, run the chain through the oily spot on the rag, and then drip a little more directly on the chain and let it work in. No washing, no multiple steps, no chain torture device. If Ron Popeil sold a chain lube, he would sell Prolink.
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Old 11-12-2013, 08:21 PM   #590
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Also, re: riding when it's literally freezing.

This is a new experience for me. And, in some ways, it is really quite exhilarating. So long as the hands and ears are protected, you can ride just as hard as you possibly can, in full office attire, and arrive at work free of perspiration- not even the taint is moist.

It's a Good Thing.
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Old 11-12-2013, 08:22 PM   #591
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mgeoffriau View Post
Unsolicited recommendation. This stuff is awesome for low-maintenance chain...maintenance.

Amazon.com: Pro Gold Products ProGold ProLink Chain Lube: Sports & Outdoors
That is the exact product which I use. It came highly recommended by an LBS a few years ago, and I've not used anything else since.

No complaints, but then I've never *really* tortured by chains before. Sunny and 70 degrees every single day is hardly a taxing environment.
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Old 11-12-2013, 08:24 PM   #592
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Perez View Post
Yeah, I'm quite glad that the Citibikes have fenders, and I've decided that Jerseybike needs them as well.


Chain maintenance... I must admit that in the past I've slacked on this. Street riding in SoCal, all you really need to do is drizzle some lube onto it from time to time. From looking around, chain cancer is obviously a common problem here.


Oh, a few words:

Back when I was shopping for the frame to build the last e-bike out of, I noted that I was going to try disc brakes. A lot of people told me this was a stupid (or, at least, un-needed) idea for various reasons.

In my experience, disc brakes have many advantages over rim brakes. They are easy to modulate, easy to adjust, and unaffected by the rim being slightly out of true. But the single most important way in which disc brakes are superior to rim brakes is this: they work just ******* fine when they're wet.

It's been so long, I'd totally forgotten how rim brakes just disappear completely the instant you blow the tiniest little bit of moisture onto them.
Your rim brakes must suck. I've never had a problem with that, they always work even when riding in mud that goes over the rim or in the pouring rain. Of course they do loose friction coef in the rain, but do do the tires, it stays pretty even, which is nice X amount of brake handle force is still the same % of threshold braking as the conditions change.

On chains, I just put the green grease on it that they use for boat trailer wheel bearings and just make sure to keep the bitch slathered with it. Wipe off and re-apply when it gets sandy. Sure it adds drag, but I'm not trying to win races or set efficiency records with it.
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Old 11-13-2013, 05:52 PM   #593
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Boeshield T9 on the chain, it's magical. It makes my chain silent, doesn't attract dirt, last 100-miles or so, and it's cheap.

Disc brakes are for clydes and mountain bikes.
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Old 11-13-2013, 06:15 PM   #594
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Disc brakes are coming to road bikes, just give it some more time.. Right now Shimano is testing some. They add about a pound but actually have modulation, unlike calipers. During those 80km/hr descents I know I'd enjoy a stronger brake. Then again it won't be any better if you have hardly any friction between the skinny tire and the road, then they may be overkill.
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Old 11-13-2013, 08:17 PM   #595
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Of course they do loose friction coef in the rain, but do do the tires, it stays pretty even, which is nice X amount of brake handle force is still the same % of threshold braking as the conditions change.
So, tell me about how you installed drum brakes on your Miata, because you want the brakes to fade as the tires start to heat up and get greasey.





In the dry, Jerseybike (the $95 Wal-Mart Wonder with cheap, knobby tires.) is easily capable of locking the rear wheel and skidding. In the wet, the brakes don't even come close to locking up the wheel.

On the e-bike, with disc brakes and nice Michelin Pilot City tires, I can easily control the brake force, wet or dry, and feel what the wheel is doing in the lever. It's very smooth and controllable.
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Old 11-13-2013, 08:51 PM   #596
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Perez View Post
So, tell me about how you installed drum brakes on your Miata, because you want the brakes to fade as the tires start to heat up and get greasey.





In the dry, Jerseybike (the $95 Wal-Mart Wonder with cheap, knobby tires.) is easily capable of locking the rear wheel and skidding. In the wet, the brakes don't even come close to locking up the wheel.

On the e-bike, with disc brakes and nice Michelin Pilot City tires, I can easily control the brake force, wet or dry, and feel what the wheel is doing in the lever. It's very smooth and controllable.
The best rim brakes are still inferior to the best discs but lighter. But you can get very high performance from a rim brake system.

If they are "V" brakes, make sure they are set up properly. Cantilevers are very sensitive to proper set up. Start by adjusting the pads so they engage the middle of the braking track, equidistant from top of rim and bead. Make sure they engage flat to the track. Then adjust so trailing edge of pad is about .020" off rim. This will reduce or eliminate squealing.

Excellent info on rim brake adjustment The Geometry of Cantilever Brakes

Most of it is simply getting a decent set of brake pads, just like the Miata. If you're stuck with rim brakes, just hit the LBS and ask for some pads that will work for commuting in cold and wet weather, not racing.

Koolstops are a known good brand. Usually 3x the stopping power that OEM pads in the dry and still work very well in the wet.

Oh yeah, another vote for Prolink Gold chain lube.
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Old 11-13-2013, 09:07 PM   #597
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Perez View Post
So, tell me about how you installed drum brakes on your Miata, because you want the brakes to fade as the tires start to heat up and get greasey.





In the dry, Jerseybike (the $95 Wal-Mart Wonder with cheap, knobby tires.) is easily capable of locking the rear wheel and skidding. In the wet, the brakes don't even come close to locking up the wheel.

On the e-bike, with disc brakes and nice Michelin Pilot City tires, I can easily control the brake force, wet or dry, and feel what the wheel is doing in the lever. It's very smooth and controllable.
Buy the $6 cane creek pads from amazon? Can lock up both cheap knobby tires at once in all conditions. I still find locking both wheels on a 2 wheeled vehicle with nothing between me and the pavement but hopes and dreams to be rather terrifying, even if it is at only 30mph or less.
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Old 11-13-2013, 09:23 PM   #598
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The best rim brakes are still inferior to the best discs but lighter. But you can get very high performance from a rim brake system.

If they are "V" brakes, make sure they are set up properly.
The brakes on both the non-electric MTB and the Hybrid 29er of of the linear-pull design. They are properly aligned in all axis, centered on the engagement area of the rim, and straight. (This is another thing I like about disc brakes- even the cheap, cable-operated ones are MUCH easier to adjust. Just two screws. Done.) And I'm sure you're right, in that a better set of pads will improve the situation. I'm just comparing whatever cheap pads came as OEM on the bikes with rim brakes vs. whatever came as OEM on the Giant Revel with disc brakes.

My corollary to your statement above, therefore, would be that the cheapest rim brakes also appear to be inferior to the cheapest disc brakes.
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Old 11-14-2013, 10:22 AM   #599
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Disc brakes are coming to road bikes, just give it some more time.. Right now Shimano is testing some. They add about a pound but actually have modulation, unlike calipers. During those 80km/hr descents I know I'd enjoy a stronger brake. Then again it won't be any better if you have hardly any friction between the skinny tire and the road, then they may be overkill.
Sram and Shimano already sell disc brakes for road bikes and both succeed at their goal of making bicycles more expensive and complicated. After these companies engineer forks for disc, on wheels with fancy lacing up front, and hydraulics for the brakes...then we'll have to redesign bicycles for axles instead of skewers because someone in marketing will decide that axle design is a problem. As long as I can get aluminum wheels with rim brakes, I'll be happy.
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Old 11-14-2013, 10:29 AM   #600
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Sram and Shimano already sell disc brakes for road bikes and both succeed at their goal of making bicycles more expensive and complicated.
More expensive? Ok, I'll accept that. What, maybe $5 per bike difference at OEM quantities for comparable quality?

More complicated? Dude. Now that I've owned both types for a while, I'll take cable-operated disc brakes over cable-operated rim brakes any day. The disc calipers are damn near idiot-proof. They can only be mounted one way, and only require adjustment in one axis, which is accomplished with one screw on each side.

This, in comparison to rim brakes, where you have to adjust:
  • The centering springs (fairly simple)
  • The height of the shoes (somewhat finicky)
  • The angle of the shoes (somewhat finicky)
  • The preload of the brake (not hard, but more finicky than disc)

And then you run into issues where, if your rim isn't perfectly straight and true (because, you know, you actually use the bike in the real world), you either have to live with rubbing or else put so much slack into the brakes that the lever goes all the way to the bottom without locking the wheel.
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