How (and why) to Ramble On your domestic shorthair - Page 1302 - Miata Turbo Forum -Boost cars, acquire cats.

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Old 06-29-2016, 01:16 PM   #26021
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I don't see the point in a lot of **** that g4m3r d00dz do, and haven't for many years.

Like buying shitty CPUs, immersing them in liquid helium, and powering them directly with the output of Niagara Falls, rather than just buying a decent-quality processor in the first place.

Or all this case-modding **** with the flashy lights and the polycarb. See-thru PC cases are so 1965...
Agreed

Honestly what I look for in a machine is performance, period. The benefit of the see through side would to be only to check on components inside sans led flashy crap. I'd rather be able to spot a potential water leak or view a motherboard error code without opening the case.

Next build I do, the exact route is to grab the latest & greatest intel unlocked chip. Put it on water and see what next level performance I can get out of it reliably. But this won't be for a very long time
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Old 06-29-2016, 01:48 PM   #26022
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Good point.

So use perfluorotripentylamine, then. Or 2-butyl-tetrahydrofurane. Just something that isn't friggin' oil... It's lazy.


--Ian
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Old 06-29-2016, 01:50 PM   #26023
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Because distilled water will become conductive in about an hour of running just from contaminants on the surface of the motherboard/tank/and radiator.
So, wash everything off with alcohol before immersion. It's what PCB companies use to clean the boards for mil-spec stuff. We go through gallons of it everyday around here to flush contaminants off the optical tooling we make.

BTW, I replaced the curly-q clutch line in my car. I had removed the old line, and put a cup under it to catch drips. Unbeknownst to me, the cup had a leak, and I got brake fluid all over the shelf on the firewall. because I couldn't get my hand in there to wipe it up, I used copious amounts of alcohol to flush it away. That portion of the firewall is the cleanest part of my car right now.
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Old 06-29-2016, 01:56 PM   #26024
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I used copious amounts of alcohol to flush it away.
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Old 06-29-2016, 02:31 PM   #26025
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Mineral Oil is Baby oil?

As far as the people that actually do the mineral oil case.. most of those people have the top cpu available at the time and then want to overclock if further.
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Old 06-29-2016, 02:43 PM   #26026
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...perfluorotripentylamine ... 2-butyl-tetrahydrofurane...
Cost, availability and toxicity vs mineral oil? I'm seeing mineral oil for under $20/gal on Amazon, et al

Perhaps I'll do the mineral oil thing with my work computer. One of my coworkers has a fish tank on his desk so this would complement it well. It will also ******* destroy the brains of the users who come to visit us
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:08 PM   #26027
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Serious question on a vaguely related note . . .

Can anyone tell me whether or not it would be a horrible idea to use distilled water instead of brake fluid in an actual Wilwood master/slave cylinder brake setup (on my son's VR driving simulator rig). The slave cylinder action just compresses some poly bushings while a transducer in the hydraulic line measures the variable pressure applied. Given that none of the hydraulics will be enclosed or otherwise contained, and that this rig is most likely going to live in my son's carpeted bedroom, I have some serious reservations about putting actual brake fluid in it, should it decide to leak.

My concerns were that mere distilled water might not provide enough lube for the internal seals, and also, that it would eventually cause some oxidation/corrosion to the sealing surfaces. Given the relative non-critical nature of the application here though, and that it most likely would never be expected to provide service life approaching that of actual automotive standards, is this something that COULD work for a reasonable period of time?

If not, is there some other less noxious hydraulic fluid available that could suffice for "indoor" use?
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:18 PM   #26028
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3M makes oil as well specifically for servers which is very cool however i cant find any quotes on it and really dont want to mess around with sending them all my company info for a quote.

3M Novec immersion cooling.

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Old 06-29-2016, 03:19 PM   #26029
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Serious question on a vaguely related note . . .

Can anyone tell me whether or not it would be a horrible idea to use distilled water instead of brake fluid in an actual Wilwood master/slave cylinder brake setup (on my son's VR driving simulator rig). The slave cylinder action just compresses some poly bushings while a transducer in the hydraulic line measures the variable pressure applied. Given that none of the hydraulics will be enclosed or otherwise contained, and that this rig is most likely going to live in my son's carpeted bedroom, I have some serious reservations about putting actual brake fluid in it, should it decide to leak.

My concerns were that mere distilled water might not provide enough lube for the internal seals, and also, that it would eventually cause some oxidation/corrosion to the sealing surfaces. Given the relative non-critical nature of the application here though, and that it most likely would never be expected to provide service life approaching that of actual automotive standards, is this something that COULD work for a reasonable period of time?

If not, is there some other less noxious hydraulic fluid available that could suffice for "indoor" use?
This is going to sound like a dumb idea, but wouldn't a water based (personal) lubricant work?
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:21 PM   #26030
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This is going to sound like a dumb idea, but wouldn't a water based (personal) lubricant work?
Something like this?
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:29 PM   #26031
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How about cooking oil?
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:30 PM   #26032
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Why not mineral oil? It seems to meet your requirements.
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:32 PM   #26033
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This is going to sound like a dumb idea, but wouldn't a water based (personal) lubricant work?
AS far as lubrication goes, that actually sounds rather plausible. Plus the potential added bonus for my son to have a ready reservoir of lube on hand at all times. (pun intended)

Anyone know anything about potential corrosion issues?
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:36 PM   #26034
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--Ian

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Old 06-29-2016, 03:38 PM   #26035
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Well, the reason I stuck to a water based lube was in case there were any rubber (lol) parts that might be eaten away from prolonged contact to a petroleum based lube. I know that coconut oil is also not safe for umm... rubber. (regardless of it's tendency to solidify in cooler environs)

http://www.machinerylubrication.com/...-systems-fluid

Hydraulic Fluids
Today’s hydraulic fluids serve multiple purposes. The major function of a hydraulic fluid is to provide energy transmission through the system which enables work and motion to be accomplished. Hydraulic fluids are also responsible for lubrication, heat transfer and contamination control. When selecting a lubricant, consider the viscosity, seal compatibility, basestock and the additive package. Three common varieties of hydraulic fluids found on the market today are petroleum-based, water-based and synthetics.

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1. Petroleum-based or mineral-based fluids are the most widely used fluids today. The properties of a mineral-based fluid depend on the additives used, the quality of the original crude oil and the refining process. Additives in a mineral-based fluid offer a range of specific performance characteristics. Common hydraulic fluid additives include rust and oxidation inhibitors (R&O), anticorrosion agents, demulsifiers, antiwear (AW) and extreme pressure (EP) agents, VI improvers and defoamants. Mineral-based fluids offer a low-cost, high quality, readily available selection.

2. Water-based fluids are used for fire-resistance due to their high-water content. They are available as oil-in-water emulsions, water-in-oil (invert) emulsions and water glycol blends. Water-based fluids can provide suitable lubrication characteristics but need to be monitored closely to avoid problems. Because water-based fluids are used in applications when fire resistance is needed, these systems and the atmosphere around the systems can be hot. Elevated temperatures cause the water in the fluids to evaporate, which causes the viscosity to rise. Occasionally, distilled water will have to be added to the system to correct the balance of the fluid. Whenever these fluids are used, several system components must be checked for compatibility, including pumps, filters, plumbing, fittings and seal materials. Water-based fluids can be more expensive than conventional petroleum-based fluids and have other disadvantages (for example, lower wear resistance) that must be weighed against the advantage of fire-resistance.

3. Synthetic fluids are man-made lubricants and many offer excellent lubrication characteristics in high-pressure and high- temperature systems. Some of the advantages of synthetic fluids may include fire-resistance (phosphate esters), lower friction, natural detergency (organic esters and ester-enhanced synthesized hydrocarbon fluids) and thermal stability. The disadvantage to these types of fluids is that they are usually more expensive than conventional fluids, they may be slightly toxic and require special disposal, and they are often not compatible with standard seal materials.
I would imagine that it might be worth looking into what substances are used in hydraulic applications in a food-safe environment.
http://www.schaefferoil.com/hydrauli...grade-oil.html
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:39 PM   #26036
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How about cooking oil?
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Why not mineral oil? It seems to meet your requirements.
TO be sure, they are both less worrisome than brake fluid. My ideal though, would be to have something water soluble that I could easily get out of the carpet if it spilled/leaked. (At some point, I assume he WILL move out, and I will be left to deal with the "remains" of what was his room.)
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:45 PM   #26037
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Mineral Oil is Baby oil?
What, you think baby oil is made of babies?

That's fucked up, man.






But in all seriousness, yes, baby oil is a by-product of refining fuels out of crude oil.
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Old 06-29-2016, 03:53 PM   #26038
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(At some point, I assume he WILL move out, and I will be left to deal with the "remains" of what was his room.)
I'm sure you'll want to replace the carpet anyway at that point
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Old 06-29-2016, 04:17 PM   #26039
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I am no longer impressed by people immersing their computers in mineral oil.

Serious question: why not use water?
I use Gatorade because it has electrolytes.
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Old 06-29-2016, 06:27 PM   #26040
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(image of vacuum tube computer)
Nice picture of the Whirlwind, but it was air-cooled. The Cray 2 was actually fluorinert-cooled.

--Ian
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