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Old 07-25-2010, 06:53 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by cardriverx View Post
I thought the wilwood caliper was a 4 piston design?
it is. but each piston only moves half the distance. same fluid volume.
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Old 07-25-2010, 06:59 PM   #22
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Yep, and therefore you only use "half" the pistons for calculating piston area on a fixed caliper.
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Old 07-25-2010, 09:37 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by hustler View Post
I have the same pedal throw from the stock brakes to the trackspeed.
Hearing that, I guess I will just stick with stock MC for now. Was going to order the rotors and pads this weekend, but I got sidetracked with other spending. I'll get them next paycheck. Then I'll be left with the Trackspeed kit and the prop valve. Should have the parts ready to go on by mid to late August. I'll stop well, but won't go well.
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Old 07-27-2010, 12:30 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by y8s View Post
it is. but each piston only moves half the distance. same fluid volume.
ahhh yeah im dumb . Thanks
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Old 07-27-2010, 01:51 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by y8s View Post
it is. but each piston only moves half the distance. same fluid volume.
Not exactly. The pistons are pulled back from the pads slightly by the pressure seal, which will be approximately the same for a slider with pistons on one side and for a fixed caliper with pistons on both sides. So the fluid displaced before a fixed caliper starts doing work may be slightly greater. Where a well-designed fixed caliper gains is in stiffness, so less fluid is displaced as force builds, providing a firmer pedal with less travel and many other advantages.

The part that's confusing until you get your head around it is that the force applied by any caliper (assuming 100 percent efficiency) is equal to the circuit pressure times the pistons on one half of the caliper.

For a one- or two-piston slider, you calculate the force using all the pistons. The equal and opposite reaction force that keeps the caliper from shooting sideways (after it shoots sideways a little on its pins and everything equalizes) is provided by the outboard portion of the clamp.

With a fixed caliper, you calculate the force using half the pistons. The equal and opposite reaction force that keeps the caliper from shooting sideways is provided by the opposing pistons pushing on the other side.
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Old 07-27-2010, 11:38 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by SolarYellow510 View Post
Not exactly. The pistons are pulled back from the pads slightly by the pressure seal, which will be approximately the same for a slider with pistons on one side and for a fixed caliper with pistons on both sides. So the fluid displaced before a fixed caliper starts doing work may be slightly greater. Where a well-designed fixed caliper gains is in stiffness, so less fluid is displaced as force builds, providing a firmer pedal with less travel and many other advantages.

The part that's confusing until you get your head around it is that the force applied by any caliper (assuming 100 percent efficiency) is equal to the circuit pressure times the pistons on one half of the caliper.

For a one- or two-piston slider, you calculate the force using all the pistons. The equal and opposite reaction force that keeps the caliper from shooting sideways (after it shoots sideways a little on its pins and everything equalizes) is provided by the outboard portion of the clamp.

With a fixed caliper, you calculate the force using half the pistons. The equal and opposite reaction force that keeps the caliper from shooting sideways is provided by the opposing pistons pushing on the other side.
if you want to confuse the noobs with the actual science behind the piston movement, go right ahead. they will just ask more questions.
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Old 07-27-2010, 01:36 PM   #27
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yep.
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