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Old 10-05-2015, 08:49 AM   #5981
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a child got raped? probably a cop did it.

WV MetroNews ? Former Moundsville officer pleads guilty to sexual assault of a minor

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A former Moundsville police officer pleaded guilty Wednesday morning to third-degree sexual assault of a teenage girl.

Ben Davis admitted to having a relationship with the teenager, as well as the distribution and display of obscene material to a minor. Davis was a Moundsville officer at the time of the crimes.

He was sentenced to 1-5 years for both charges, but will serve only 1 year in prison. He will also register as a sex offender for life.
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Old 10-05-2015, 09:13 AM   #5982
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Im sure a cop's worst call is to that of another cop's domestic abuse.

Audubon officer charged in gun incident

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An Audubon police officer is facing charges after an incident outside his Westmont home.

Thomas Gorman, 37, allegedly tried to take the gun of an on-duty Audubon police officer during an altercation Thursday in the first block of Utica Avenue, according to a criminal complaint.

A gun was fired during the 4:45 p.m. confrontation, but no one was injured, according to the Camden County Prosecutor's Office.

The on-duty officer, who was not identified, was in uniform and "acting in the performance of his duties" when he went to Gorman's home, according to the complaint. Gorman lives at the property with his wife, also an Audubon police officer, according to online records.

...
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Old 10-05-2015, 09:17 AM   #5983
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This guy should win a Pulitzer for his opening line here:

Ninth Circuit Imposes (Some) Limits On Cops Yanking Things Out of Your ***

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Mark Tyrell Fowlkes had a bad day.

For you or me, that means realizing that there's no credit left on our Starbucks card or our co-workers being annoying or getting a flat tire. For Fowlkes, it meant the Long Beach Police Department forcibly pulling something out of his ***.
Quote:
...Officers believed that Fowlkes was not being cooperative displaying his anus and thought he was trying to push something in there. One Sergeant testified that he believed Fowlkes was trying to force an object further into his anus in order to destroy evidence. That's not how anuses work. That's not how any of this works. But to prevent Fowlkes from further hiding or destroying something in his anus, Sargeant Michael Gibbs “delivered a drive stun tase to the center portion of the defendant’s back” and the officers handcuffed him. Officers claim they could see a plastic bag protruding from Fowlkes. With Fowlkes cuffed, tased, and under the control of five officers, the officers decided that immediate action was needed to protect evidence. Sargeeant Michael Gibbs gloved up and pulled the object out of Fowlkes' rectum without seeking a warrant, without medical training or medical personnel, and "without the assistance of anesthesia, lubricant, or medical dilation," producing blood and feces.

...

The Ninth Circuit found the warrantless visual strip search reasonable, including the visual body cavity search, mostly on the grounds that the government arrests so many people it would be impractical to get warrants to strip-search them, and because jail safety is important because the government arrests so many people. As Dilbert would say, that's not being circular, it's having no loose ends.

But the Court noted actual limits on intrusions into our bodies. "Therefore, while visual cavity searches that do not require physical entry into a prisoner’s body are generally permissible without a warrant during the jail intake process, physical cavity searches generally are not." Did the Court recognize a general rule against sergeants yanking things out of our asses without a warrant? Not exactly. It's the Ninth Circuit, sure, but this is still America. The Court avoided a broad rule. "We need not and do not determine whether a warrant is required to seize evidence discovered during a visual strip search from an inmate’s body because the officers’ conduct here was unreasonable for other reasons." The Court decided that the search was unreasonable — and thus violated the Fourth Amendment — because the officers violated the jail's own written policies requiring a medically trained person conduct cavity searches, because Fowlkes posed no immediate threat, because the officers had no training in such measures that would let them evaluate whether they were safe or necessary, and because the officers did not take any steps to minimize trauma:

Here, the LBPD officers did not take adequate steps to minimize Fowlkes’ physical trauma. They did not, for example, use lubrication or ensure that the removal was conducted under sanitary conditions; they did not seek the guidance or assistance of medical personnel; and they did not assure themselves that removing the object from Fowlkes’ rectum was safe—indeed they did not know the size, shape, or substance of the object. Further, they did nothing to mitigate his anxiety or emotional trauma. They did not, for example, offer him options for removing the contraband or secure his compliance; they did not (and could not) assure him that the removal was safe or being conducted by a trained professional; and they did not (and could not) assure him that the procedure was legal and in keeping with LBPD policy rather than an arbitrary show of force.

The Ninth Circuit — bless its heart — seems to think that physical and emotional trauma were a bug, not a feature, of the officers' approach. But at least we know: there are limits to the judiciary's willingness to let cops conduct medical procedures on you.

So the Ninth Circuit reversed Fowlkes' conviction — on the one count arising from the drugs found in his rectum. It upheld the rest of the conviction.

Isn't justice majestic?
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Old 10-05-2015, 09:25 AM   #5984
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what?!!!! cops abuse power!!! NO WAY!!!!

Abuse of authority: Cops caught using badge for wrong reasons

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Const. Benjamin Caunter: While on duty in 2012, the Toronto drug squad investigator contacted an escort and met her at a hotel. He said he didn't want to pay because he "did not like the way she looked." They got in an argument and he showed the woman and her friend his badge and gun. She didn't perform any sexual acts.

The officer was also busted for spending 73 hours of police time surfing the web over three months, including hours spent scouring an escort website. His 2013 disciplinary decision notes that "taxpayers of this city" were deprived of nine days of work.

Officer's defence: Caunter's lawyer told the hearing the officer had a sterling employment history and was undergoing turmoil in his personal life. He had sought counselling on his own.

Discipline: Docked 18 days pay.



Sgt. Christopher Jackson: The OPP supervisor directed seven officers in his Caledon platoon in 2014 to "make false notebook entries" that they had been conducting a RIDE check to catch impaired drivers. In reality, they spent the hour hanging out at Tim Hortons. They claimed they checked 64 vehicles. "The knowledge that a group of on-duty officers led by their supervisor, falsely created records of duties not performed would be offensive to the general public," the OPP official wrote in a 2015 decision disciplining Sgt. Jackson.

Officer's defence: Jackson's lawyer told the hearing the officer had been dealing with personal and family health problems and on that night did not live up to the expectations of the OPP.

Discipline: Docked 60 hours pay.



Const. Wing Tam: In uniform, the Toronto officer visited the House of Lancaster, a west-end strip club, in 2011. He didn't tell dispatch where he was. He went into the manager's office with one of the women and allowed pictures to be taken of her wearing his handcuffs and with him holding her by the wrist. He had been previously disciplined four times, including skipping out of traffic court to work a paid-duty assignment.

Officer's defence: Tam's lawyer told the hearing his client was at the club because his wife makes costumes for dancers, including ones at the club. He said the visit was nothing more than a professional interaction.

Discipline: Docked five days pay in 2012.



Sgt. Jeremy Boyko: The Toronto cop's platoon was scheduled to do a special project focused on combating crimes in their west-end division in 2012. Instead, Sgt. Boyko suggested the officers go to a condo where one of them lived, where they ate snacks and watched TV until their shifts were almost over. His notes claimed he was on foot patrol.

"The behaviour of Sgt. Boyko has damaged the reputation of the Toronto Police Service and the public trust," the presiding officer said in disciplining the officer in 2013.

Discipline: Demoted for one year and docked 20 days pay.



Const. John Madeley: Late for a union meeting, the Toronto officer took a police cruiser and sped through the city, repeatedly sounding his sirens and using evasive manoeuvres — including driving on a highway shoulder — to bypass traffic. The cruiser's in-car camera caught the 2011 incident. "Numerous vehicles can be seen taking evasive action in an effort to move out of the way for the emergency vehicle. It is my opinion that Const. Madeley's driving did in fact create unsafe conditions for other users of the highway," the presiding officer said in disciplining Madeley, who had been previously sanctioned for drinking and driving.

Officer's defence: His lawyer said Madeley was motivated to get to the union meeting on behalf of the members but realizes he did not demonstrate good judgment.

Discipline: Docked two days pay in 2012.



Const. Adam Ford: While on duty in 2010, the York Region detective attached an electronic tracking device to a car belonging to his former brother-in-law and business partner. He did not have a court order and was caught on surveillance video.

Ford "used knowledge that he acquired as a police officer to install a tracking device," the presiding officer ruled in his 2010 disciplinary decision. "The public needs to be assured that they will not be subjected to police misconduct that results in the use of investigative techniques that constitute an unreasonable search."

Officer's defence: Const. Ford said he installed the device out of concern for a family member, but wanted to apologize for the "very poor decision" he made.

Discipline: Docked 88 hours pay.



Const. Suhail Khawaja: The Toronto officer pulled a woman over and wrote her tickets for several driving infractions in 2012. He told her if she took the tickets to court he would try to help her through the court process. He also asked if her employer could get his son a job. "The driver was left with the impression … that her ability to get his son a job would impact the manner in which her provincial offences matters would be resolved," according to a 2013 agreed statement of facts.

Officer's defence: Khawaja's lawyer told the tribunal "the matters were not related and the conversation, while ill advised, was innocent."

Discipline: Docked eight days pay.



Const. Tyson Mayer: At the request of a friend, the OPP officer accessed an internal investigation report into a stolen snowmobile trailer in 2013. He told his friend he was a suspect in an investigation and shared details of the report. "It is difficult to think of anything more offensive than a police officer divulging matters which are his duty to keep secret," the presiding officer said in a 2014 decision disciplining the officer.

Officer's defence: The presiding officer noted he believed Mayer was "genuinely ashamed and embarrassed" by his misconduct.

Discipline: Docked 60 hours pay.



Snooping confidential databases: At least 25 officers have been busted in the past five years for improper searches of internal databases, checking on former lovers, colleagues and business partners. Some of the officers then shared the confidential information to outsiders to help with custody battles or court disputes.



Const. Hezekiah Tai: The Durham Region officer chatted up a waitress at a Richmond Hill bar in 2013 and learned she lived in Ajax, near his patrol zone. She wouldn't give him her number. The next day, while on duty, he searched the waitress and her family on a police database. He left his post and parked his cruiser outside her family home.

When confronted by internal investigators, he initially claimed his interest in the woman was strictly professional. Months earlier, he had been disciplined for a similar incident involving "inappropriate professional conduct in relation to a female." In that case, he told the force in a handwritten note: "I've learned from this and it won't happen again."

Officer's defence: In a joint submission at his 2014 disciplinary hearing, the prosecutor and defence lawyer noted that Const. Tai chose to plead guilty at the first opportunity, owning up to his misconduct.

Discipline: Docked 120 hours pay.



Const. Ian Parker: The veteran OPP officer made inappropriate searches on a police database of 124 people — including former girlfriends, private citizens, fellow OPP officers, their spouses and their children.

On seven different shifts, he spent upwards of nine hours of taxpayer-funded time making these improper computer searches. "The misuse of these information databases for personal reasons by Provincial Constable Parker is a violation of that (public) trust and a serious misconduct," a senior OPP officer said at the constable's 2014 disciplinary hearing.

Officer's defence: Parker's lawyer told the hearing that the officer's improper searches were out of curiosity and there were no ulterior motives. The officer's apologized to colleagues affected by his misconduct.

Discipline: Docked 30 hours pay.



Const. Lisa Peck: The OPP officer checked internal databases for non-police reasons more than 550 times, accessing everything from photographs to confidential driver profiles and addresses.

Internal investigators found the checks, which focused on at least 23 people over six years, were done using the account of a suspended officer who had special database restricted to authorized users.

Officer's defence: Peck told investigations she searched the databases out of curiosity and didn't save or share any of the information. Her lawyer told the hearing she took immediate and full responsibility for her misconduct.

Discipline: Docked 30 hours pay in 2014.



Const. Sonny Deshpande: The veteran OPP highway patrolman with the Whitby detachment was busted for a string of misconducts in 2013 after being put under surveillance by Durham police investigating a cocaine trafficking ring. There was no evidence tying him to the drug crimes but he was caught making 16 improper searches on police databases, as well as extensive time-theft. Over the course of 13 shifts, he spent more than 45 hours not doing police work and instead hung out at home or with friends.

Deshpande had previously been disciplined in 2010 for walking out of a Superstore with a cart full of groceries without paying.

Officer's defence: Deshpande's lawyer told the hearing that by pleading guilty the officer showed remorse for his misconduct.

Discipline: In 2015, he was demoted to a lower pay grade for 18 months.
It's gotta be nice having a job where breaking the law means a few hours docked off your paycheck.
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Old 10-06-2015, 01:33 AM   #5985
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Cops hate it when u pull them over for breaking the law.

Man pulls over cops for making illegal turn gets 162 ticket.

Man pulls over cops for making illegal turn, gets $162 ticket

"The cops pulled over and Reilley pulled up beside them. “Do you realize that you made an illegal left turn without any flashing lights?” Reielley asked. The police were dumbfounded. Reilley says they became “hostile” and said, “You don’t pull us over, we pull you over.” They surrounded Reilley’s car and wrote him a ticket for $162 ($146 U.S.) for honking his horn unnecessarily."
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Old 10-07-2015, 11:21 AM   #5986
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Scott can rest a little easier now:



Good News: Cops Now Slightly More Likely to Lube You First

SEPTEMBER 30, 2015

Some things are funny because they’re funny; other things are funny (at least to me) because they’re so outrageous that the brain realizes the alternatives are fury, depression, or maybe furious depression, and it does what it can to channel that.

This is the second kind of thing.

Ken White reports today on the opinion in United States v. Fowlkes, in which that notoriously liberal Ninth Circuit actually went so far as to impose (some) limits on cops yanking things out of your ***. See “Ninth Circuit Imposes (Some) Limits On Cops Yanking Things Out of Your ***,Popehat (Sept. 30, 2015).

I imagine some of you, probably the non-lawyers, believed there were already some limits on cops yanking things out of your ***, or, for that matter, putting things in it, which is often a required precursor to such yanking. Technically there are such limits, though I’m sure somebody out there would be willing to debate whether the Founders ever contemplated, when crafting the Fourth Amendment, the possibility that the government they were creating might one day employ agents to look up citizen asses on a regular basis.

For why declare [in a Bill of Rights] that things shall not be done which there is no power to do? Why, for instance, should it be said that constables may not invade the buttocks of the citizenry, when no power is given by which such spelunking could be justified? I will not contend that such a provision would confer a regulating power; but it is evident that it would furnish, to men disposed to usurp, a plausible pretense for claiming that power.
Alexander Hamilton, Federalist No. 84 (first draft)
The right of the people to be secure in their persons, anuses, rectums, colons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place or buttocks to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
U.S. Const., amend. IV (rejected draft)



They probably didn’t, partly because (1) there was no such thing as a police force at the time and (2) they assumed we would not all go completely insane in less than 300 years.

Anyway, the case stems from (wait for it) yet another battle in the War on Drugs, specifically a DEA/Long Beach PD operation in 2006. After (constitutionally) gathering enough evidence to arrest Mr. Fowlkes for dealing crack, the LBPD brought him to the city jail for “processing.” This involved a strip search, and (unfortunately) visual strip searches have been held constitutional in this context regardless of what you’ve been arrested for, so that would also have been constitutional here.

But then the real fun began.

Once Fowlkes was naked, handcuffed, and surrounded by five officers, a Sgt. Gibbs then directed him to spread his buttocks for a visual search. The officers testified, however, that Fowlkes’ subsequent hand movements led them to believe he was trying to push something further up there. Claiming he thought Fowlkes was trying to “destroy evidence,” Gibbs tased him and got his fellow officers to bend him over. Gibbs’s eagle eye then spotted something protruding. He didn’t know what it was, or “how large it was or how far it extended into Fowlkes’ body.” So, what does one do in such a situation? Here’s what one does not do, or at least what the LBPD does not do: “attempt to obtain a warrant, summon medical personnel, move Fowlkes to a sanitary location, or allow Fowlkes to pass the suspected contraband naturally,” or even “use lubrication.” Instead, one immediately grabs the mystery item and forcibly yanks it out.

The Ninth Circuit’s calm tone tends to minimize some of the stupidity here. First, about the allegedly suspicious hand movements of one who has just been asked to spread his buttocks: the officers “acknowledged there was no other way … to comply with the directive other than by reaching back” there. Second and more importantly, the claim that Fowlkes might have been trying “to destroy evidence” is hilarious. The Ninth Circuit does note that the claim of exigent circumstances was not reasonable because “Fowlkes, like the evidence lodged inside his rectum, was not going anywhere,” which is not bad for a court. But Ken’s line, “that’s not how anuses work,” is a lot better.

This wasn’t, or shouldn’t have been, a difficult decision for the court. There are lots of cases holding that warrantless physical cavity searches are generally not reasonable (setting aside whether this should be okay with a warrant). What is a little perplexing is the number of words it takes the court to conclude that this particular warrantless physical cavity search was not reasonable. Sure, it’s a multi-factor, totality-of-the-circumstances test. But on these facts I have trouble with even the suggestion that this might have been okay if the police had used “lubricant” or invited a doctor along. As Ken also points out, there were doctors involved in the horrific New Mexico case too.

Also, the court not only fails to express much outrage, it includes a footnote carefully leaving the door to your rectum open:
To be clear, our holding does not preclude … seizure of contraband from a suspect’s rectum in all cases. [W]e hold only that the particular manner of seizing evidence employed by the LBPD in this case was unreasonable.
Oh, good to know.

Worse, there is a dissent. The dissenter decided she really couldn’t say this was unreasonable, at least by comparison to some of the even more horrible cases on which the court has ruled. But just because you can point to something worse doesn’t mean the thing in front of you is good. And remember, this was done not to look for a bomb or plutonium or something like that, but just to get some evidence that they probably didn’t even need in order to put away a small-time drug dealer.

Plus, they could have just waited a couple of days. I’m not saying they had to wait a month, like they do in those countries that coddle defendants, like Nigeria. See “Accused Celebrity Smuggler Cleared After 24 ‘Closely Monitored’ Bowel Movements,Lowering the Bar (Nov. 9, 2011). Just a couple of days.


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Old 10-07-2015, 11:23 AM   #5987
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repost.
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Old 10-07-2015, 11:28 AM   #5988
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Braineack View Post
repost.
Really? I post an article describing in detail what police may and may not do to your anus, and all you can come up with is a false claim that it's a repost?
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Old 10-07-2015, 11:36 AM   #5989
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it's like 2 posts before yours...
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Old 10-07-2015, 12:01 PM   #5990
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Braineack View Post
it's like 2 posts before yours...
I scrolled up and counted, was 3 posts above his.
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Old 10-07-2015, 12:12 PM   #5991
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The LoweringTheBar report is much funnier.

Also, here is pie:


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The hero warrior cop is ready to get roided up, rape, and drink and drive-80-kittenpie_27ca00b3a8a7dbf7c4f539dce5eab730349a348d.jpg  
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Old 10-08-2015, 09:28 AM   #5992
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got domestic issues?

NYPD Officer Charged W/ Murdering Wife After Suicide Attempt

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Officer Paul Leitgeb, 49, who is now retired from the NYPD, has been arrested in connection with the murder of his wife.

42-year-old Tricia Odierna was found dead inside her home on October 1st. Shortly after her body was found, New York State Police, Metro North Police, Suffolk County Police, and Dutchess County Sheriff’s Office began an extensive manhunt for Officer Leitgeb.

Officer Leitgeb was eventually found on the Appalachian Trail five days later. According to police, Officer Leitgeb had attempted suicide, as he had cut his wrist and his throat. Officer Leitgeb and State Troopers were in a tense standoff, where he threatened further harm to himself, as well as the responding officers – he was armed with a box cutter.

Officer Leitgeb is currently recuperating from his self-inflicted wounds at Mid-Hudson Regional Hospital in Poughkeepsie. He will be arraigned whenever he is released from the hospital. He is facing charges of second-degree murder.

Tricia Odierna was the proud mother of 2 beautiful children, 7-year-old twins, Alicia and Jake. Tricia had also taken in three nephews after the death of one of her sisters.
surprise police actually arrested him and didnt just shoot him since he was holding a knife and harming himself.
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Old 10-08-2015, 09:31 AM   #5993
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hate blacks?

?Leave my city': Minnesota cop caught on video shoving and hitting unarmed man after traffic stop

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Members of the Somali Human Rights Commission met with police in Richfield, Minnesota on Tuesday after a local officer was caught on video pushing and hitting a 19-year-old man following a traffic stop, KARE-TV reported.

“He said, ‘Leave my city, and don’t come back for the rest of tonight or I’m going to tow your car,'” Kamal Gelle said of his encounter with the officer last Saturday, which was posted on Twitter.

Gelle told the Minnesota Star-Tribune that when he was initially pulled over near a park, he did not have his license with him and that he was not immediately able to give the officer his insurance information.

At that point, he said, the officer gave him a citation for careless driving and Gelle drove away. A short time later, however, he pulled over to talk to his brother on the phone. The video begins with the officer approaching Gelle and yelling at him, before shoving him and ultimately hitting him on the head.

“He’s a cop,” Gelle said. “He had two dogs in the car barking. He had a gun. With everything that’s been going on with police … I got scared. I thought I was going to be a victim.”

The officer was placed on administrative leave, and Gelle, who is of Somali descent, joined members of the commission for a meeting with Police Chief Mike Koob. Richfield is a suburb of the Minneapolis-St. Paul area, where most of the state’s Somali-American population resides.
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Old 10-08-2015, 09:36 AM   #5994
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like to get arrested?

Providence officer accused of threatening his doctor - News, Weather and Classifieds for Southern New England

Quote:
A Providence police officer was arrested after allegedly threatening to kill his doctor.

Authorities told NBC 10 News that Patrolman Scott Logan was accused of sending several threatening texts to his doctor in Johnston, as he was apparently unhappy with his treatment. He was apprehended in Johnston while he was driving home around 3:30 p.m. on Wednesday.

It’s his third arrest in as many months, and his second in a about week for allegedly threatening someone.

Last week, Logan was accused of sending serious threatening messages to three of his superior officers at the Providence Police Department, where he is on suspension following a gun charge.

In August, he was accused of having a gun with a scratched off serial number.

While sources say a gym bag with a Colt pistol was found on Broad Street, Logan told police that a former girlfriend had given him the gun and asked him to turn it in.

He said he left the gun in his bag, forgot about it, and then accidentally left the bag on top of his cruiser. A grand jury indicted Logan earlier this month.

The 45 year old is no stranger to discipline.

In April, a resident snapped a picture of Logan sleeping in his cruiser and posted it to Twitter.

Police said he was up late the night before, helping to resolve an incident with a mentally ill man and a machete.

Authorities told NBC 10 he was disciplined, but won't say how. He's protected under the Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights.

A review of media archives shows this latest indictment is not Logan's first.

He was arrested 1997 and later indicted on charges of assault with a dangerous weapon. Then 28 years old, and off duty at the time, the officer was accused of breaking into his ex-girlfriend's Woonsocket house and pointing a gun at her and her new boyfriend. He was cleared of the more serious charges and found guilty on one count of disorderly conduct.

In June 1998, while out on suspension for the incident with his ex-girlfriend, media reports show Logan was involved in a road rage incident after a bachelor party.

He and another off-duty officer chased a car on route 95 when the other officer fired three shots.

The men in the other car were arrested.

It's unclear if Logan or the second officer were disciplined or cleared.

On Wednesday, Logan was charged with felony cyber-stalking/harassment and disorderly conduct. He pleaded not guilty during his arraignment in Providence Superior Court.

He is being held at ACI without bail as a violator on the gun charge and is due in Superior Court on Thursday.

Evan England, spokesman for Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza, told NBC 10 Logan's latest arrest is "another troubling development" and Logan remains suspended without pay as the legal process plays out, and after that appropriate action will be taken.

England said they hope Logan "will seek any treatment that he may need."
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Old 10-08-2015, 09:39 AM   #5995
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hate blacks and cameras? youre probably a cop.


Quote:
After getting arrested and tased over a simple parking ticket, a store clerk has filed a lawsuit against the officer who used excessive force against him. Although the officer claimed that the clerk stood in a threatening position before he was forced to deploy his Taser, recently released dashcam video revealed that the officer lied and had no reason to lawfully detain the clerk.

On May 31, 2014, Officer Dale Secor approached a car parked perpendicular in a driveway and attempted to look through its tinted windows. When Short Stop Mini Mart clerk Damian Words saw the officer checking out his car, he stepped out of the store and crossed the street towards Secor. Before even speaking with Words, the officer immediately radioed for backup.

“You can’t park on the sidewalk,” Secor told Words.

“But you can’t go in nobody’s car,” Words responded.

“I can tow your car,” Secor replied.

Instead of writing a ticket or asking Words to move his car, Secor can be seen on dash cam video ignoring the clerk’s explanation while ordering Words to hand over his identification.

...

Although Secor was able to remove the Taser probe in Words’ chest, the store clerk had to wait ten minutes for paramedics to remove the probe in his arm. In his arrest report, Secor claimed that he feared Words may have had a weapon, but no weapon was found at the scene. Secor also wrote that Words, “bladed his body and got into a power stance” a moment before Secor fired his Taser.

But Secor’s dash cam video revealed that the officer provided false information in his report. During the moments before Secor fired his Taser, Words remained calm with his empty hands exposed and not standing in a threatening position. He simply wanted to know why Secor was arresting him over a parking ticket.

Secor also wrote in his report that Words was listed as a known gang member after running his license plate. But federal records and state records in Kansas, Missouri, and Michigan reveal that Words is not a gang member and has no history of violent crime.

Charged with failing to comply with an officer and resisting arrest, Words only pleaded guilty to parking illegally. He paid a $50 fine. Words also filed a lawsuit against the Kansas City Police Department and Officer Secor for unnecessary and excessive use of force over a mere parking ticket.

The video below highlights two key points: the power of a cop’s word against yours and the power video has to expose lies.
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Old 10-08-2015, 09:42 AM   #5996
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need to make quotes? randomly send out your work in the mail and hope someone does it for you and mails it back.

HPD cop under fire for sending speeding tickets in mail

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The Houston Police Department has launched an internal investigation into the ticket-writing habits of a senior police officer after the KHOU 11 I-Team began asking questions about his behavior on the road.

David Carter, an officer on the force since 2002, has been temporarily relieved of duty, meaning he no longer has a badge or police powers during the probe.

The I-Team discovered Carter wrote several speeding tickets to drivers without ever pulling them over.


Emanuel Morfin was baffled when he received a speeding ticket by certified mail for doing 90 mph in a 60 mph zone on the North Freeway. Morfin said he wasn’t anywhere near the area at the time.

“Actually I was down south in South Texas, so I'm like, well how am I speeding in Houston if I'm out of town?” Morfin said. “It was kind of ridiculous I was kind of shocked.”

The I-Team discovered it wasn't the first time Carter sent tickets by certified mail without ever making a traffic stop.

"You have an officer who is abusing their discretionary authority,” said Criminal Justice Professor Larry Karson with the University of Houston-Downtown. "You have no idea who's driving that car. You're sending that ticket to a registered owner, who may or may not be behind the wheel.”

...

Karson said there’s another problem—one that puts the public at risk. According to records, Carter wrote that he paced the alleged violator in his personal car, not in his patrol car.

"He's actually making the situation worse, because what he's doing is he's becoming another vehicle flying down at 90 miles an hour and no one knows that he is a police officer,” Karson said. “All they know it's another crazy person on the highway.”

The I-Team again tried to get answers from the 13-year HPD veteran, but got nowhere.

I-Team: “Can you explain that, sir? That's a reasonable question and the public deserves an answer."

"Excuse me," he said, walking to his car.

Carter is being paid during the investigation, but must remain home during work hours while it continues. As for the citizens he mailed tickets, the city’s legal department ultimately dismissed the cases.

“I do not believe the citizens had any knowledge of the citations. Therefore, I did not think it was in the interest of justice to prosecute the cases and asked that all of the citations be dismissed,” said Randy Zamora, criminal law division chief with city’s legal department.
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Old 10-08-2015, 09:46 AM   #5997
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like being a cowboy?

Darien Police officers arrested; placed on paid leave | WTNH Connecticut News

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Two Darien officers have been arrested and placed an paid administrative leave after they were arrested by Connecticut State Police.

41-year-old James Martin and 38-year-old Daniel Ehret, both 10 year veterans of the Darien police force, have been charged with reckless endangerment, breach of peace, and unlawful discharge of a firearm.

This all comes after police responded to an Aug. 1 call of shots fired in the town of Darien. Officers arrived to find the exterior of a vehicle belonging to James Martin riddled with numerous gunshots.

Darien Police Chief Duane Lovello says that the two officers involved were placed on paid administrative leave after the incident occurred. “The allegations leading to the arrests are disturbing. I cannot conceive of anything that would lead police officers to do something so profoundly dangerous and wholly irresponsible. This conduct is intolerable and does not reflect the professional values or the ethical, responsible, and moral conduct we demand of Darien police officers and their duty to the public we serve,” Chief Lovello said in a statement.

A separate internal investigation will begin and Darien police say that those findings will determine the course of disciplinary measures taken against those officers.
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Old 10-08-2015, 09:51 AM   #5998
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hate video? youre probably a cop that lied.

Trial begins in LMPD officer perjury case

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A Louisville Metro Police officer faces a jury trial this week, accused of intentionally misleading a grand jury about a man she said shoved her, cursed at her and attempted to flee arrest.

Prosecutors allege Officer Leslee Wagner perjured herself when she recounted to a January 2014 grand jury an altercation involving repo man Adam Hannahs, who attempted to repossess a car in her apartment complex's parking lot around 3 a.m. Sept. 5, 2013.

That testimony led to misdemeanor and felony charges against Hannahs, 35, of Lexington.

"Many of the things she stated happened that day simply weren't true. They didn't happen," said assistant commonwealth's attorney Emily Cecil. "Leslee Wagner has to create this whole story to justify her actions from that day."

Perjury allegations arose when a video of the incident recorded by Hannahs surfaced, highlighting discrepancies between the confrontation and Wagner's testimony.

But those inconsistencies were not intentional, said Wagner's attorney, Steve Schroering.

"You're also going to see she did not intentionally make one false statement to the grand jury," Schroering told jurors Tuesday in opening statements. "She made some mistakes in the minor details about what happened, but the guts of what happened is 100 percent accurate even four months later."

She and her husband — who was an LMPD officer at the time — were awoken by the sound of a car alarm at their home in the 11000 block of Perthshire Lane. Larry Wagner went outside first, and Leslee Wagner soon followed.

Hannahs was disturbing the peace by setting off the car alarm, and as a courtesy officer for the apartment complex, Wagner's husband was investigating the noise, Schroering said.

When confronted, the man was "extremely uncooperative," Leslee Wagner wrote in an arrest citation. He put his hands into his pocket where a knife was visible before he walked away cursing, she said, calling him "extremely irate" during the grand jury presentation.

Hannahs' recording shows Leslee Wagner brought out a badge after the altercation began, refuting her testimony that her husband showed his badge upon confronting Hannahs. Schroering said his client believed her husband did leave their home with his badge.

Wagner also testified that Hannahs responded to Larry's badge by cursing at the off-duty officers, saying, "I don't give a f---" and "That doesn't mean s---."

Hannahs does not curse in the video. He does say, "I don't care. Let's get a uniform, a uniformed officer." Schroering noted the man whose car was being repossessed, who was on scene, did once mention Larry Wagner was an officer.

In court Tuesday, Hannahs maintained he wasn't sure if the Wagners were actually officers, as they were dressed in pajamas, barefoot and acting as though it were their car being repossessed. He testified Leslee Wagner did flash a badge as she neared him but it was too dark to see clearly.

On the video, Wagner's husband asks Hannahs for identification and tells him, "There's two police cars. I'm going to bring you a badge. I'm going to bring you an ID card with my picture on it, and you're gonna give me an ID."

Hannahs repeatedly states he wants a uniformed, on-duty officer. The two go back and forth, with the Wagners both eventually yelling and pointing their guns at the man.

Leslee Wagner also told the grand jury Hannahs pushed her as he tried to flee. Hannahs testified Tuesday she did make contact with his forearm but he jerked it away and started running, believing he would be shot. In his opening statement, Schroering said his client was pushed, albeit off camera.

Neighbors who were eyewitnesses told police investigators they never saw Hannahs shove Wagner, the LMPD investigation found.

Prosecutors Cecil and Critt Cunningham also highlighted the Wagners' language toward Hannahs.

On the video, Leslee Wagner is heard cursing at the man when telling him to get on the ground. Later, once Hannahs is in handcuffs, Leslee Wagner is heard telling Hannahs she is going to shoot him in the face before using a slur against him.

Wagner's on-camera language was "rude, aggressive or improper," but that's not what the trial is about, Schroering told the jury.

Following an internal LMPD Public Integrity Unit Investigation that concluded Wagner's testimony was "at best, inconsistent with the video evidence," Wagner was charged with two counts each of first-degree perjury and false swearing.

The third-degree assault, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct charges against Hannahs were ultimately dropped.

Wagner, a 13-year veteran of the police department, is currently assigned to the Homicide Unit's Cold Case Squad. Her husband has since retired and does not face any charges.

The trial is set to resume Wednesday morning before Jefferson Circuit Judge Judith McDonald-Burkman with more prosecution witnesses. Wagner is eventually expected to take the stand.
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Old 10-08-2015, 10:50 AM   #5999
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im a public official.

this is a public meeting.

recording is legal.


but i dont want you to.


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Old 10-09-2015, 08:54 AM   #6000
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Illiterate cops try to arrest completely innocent dumbass kids; FACEPALM ENSUES.


Quote:
Two Incompetent Fairfield, Iowa Police Officers fired at a car occupied by two teenage kids, all because the frightened teenagers decided to ‘run’ after the police mistakenly misread their license plate. Officer Kathryn Blumhagen misread the plate when she ran it through the system. When the plate came back, she believed the plates and/or the car was stolen because they didn’t match. Thus, her inability to read lead to a potentially deadly situation.

In the dash cam video, you can see that Officer Blumhagen is having fun violating department policy. Though her comments, it’s clear that she’s enjoying the high-speed chase, setting aside public safety for some ‘thrill ride’.

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