4 Port Oil Cooler Sandwich Plate? - Miata Turbo Forum -Boost cars, acquire cats.

Welcome to Miataturbo.net   Members
 


Engine Performance This section is for discussion on all engine building related questions. KMiata

Reply
 
 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-24-2016, 01:28 PM   #1
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: MA
Posts: 171
Total Cats: 9
Default 4 Port Oil Cooler Sandwich Plate?

I've been looking into oil cooler options for a while now, and couldn't find what I was looking. Does anyone know if someone makes a 4 port t-stat sandwich plate (2 AN fittings and 2 1 1/8npt)?.

EDIT: T-stat sandwich plate.

Thank you.

Last edited by robertw; 08-24-2016 at 02:53 PM.
robertw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 02:07 PM   #2
Junior Member
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Utah
Posts: 109
Total Cats: -30
Default

Look at cummins torque converter cooler. I think the fittings aren't what you are looking for but it is 4 port(as long as you mean 2 in and 2 out)

EDIT: I thought it said oil cooler. Not a sandwich plate.
Pretending2koolz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 02:10 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 47
Total Cats: 1
Default

miataki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 02:53 PM   #4
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: MA
Posts: 171
Total Cats: 9
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by miataki View Post
Thanks. I edited my original post, forgot to say I was looking for a t-stat'd adapter.
robertw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 03:00 PM   #5
Ich verstehe nur Bahnhof
iTrader: (2)
 
psyber_0ptix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 2,814
Total Cats: 224
Default

Mocal and drill

Or mocal and use AN gauge adapters
psyber_0ptix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 03:00 PM   #6
SadFab Sales Lady
iTrader: (5)
 
aidandj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Beaverton, USA
Posts: 15,215
Total Cats: 977
Default

Run oil temp in AN fittings.
aidandj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 03:09 PM   #7
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: MA
Posts: 171
Total Cats: 9
Default

robertw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 03:32 PM   #8
Ich verstehe nur Bahnhof
iTrader: (2)
 
psyber_0ptix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 2,814
Total Cats: 224
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by robertw View Post
!!! Now I'm just trying to imagine so many things fitting in a small space
psyber_0ptix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 03:51 PM   #9
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: MA
Posts: 171
Total Cats: 9
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by psyber_0ptix View Post
Mocal and drill

Or mocal and use AN gauge adapters
I was trying to piece together a DIYcooler kit, but it's not really coming out to be much cheaper than the Trackspeed kit. lol So maybe yeah, mocal and drill.
robertw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 05:38 PM   #10
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: MA
Posts: 171
Total Cats: 9
Default

Ordered the trackspeed kit. Wallet hurts bad.
robertw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2016, 10:45 PM   #11
afm
Junior Member
iTrader: (3)
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Berkeley, CA
Posts: 426
Total Cats: 40
Default

Trackspeed kit is cheaper than sum of the Setrab and Mocal parts. Even if you account for street prices being cheaper than MSRP.
afm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2016, 10:30 AM   #12
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: MA
Posts: 171
Total Cats: 9
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by afm View Post
Trackspeed kit is cheaper than sum of the Setrab and Mocal parts. Even if you account for street prices being cheaper than MSRP.
That's what I found pretty quickly.
robertw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2016, 11:02 AM   #13
Boost Pope
iTrader: (8)
 
Joe Perez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 24,828
Total Cats: 1,602
Default

Personal opinion, based on a sample-size of one.

For a street application, I'm unimpressed with sandwich-plate adapters with internal thermostats. They seem to pass a fair bit of oil through the cooler even when cold, with the result that warmup takes an extremely long time under normal driving, even with a turbocharged engine.
Joe Perez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2016, 11:43 AM   #14
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: MA
Posts: 171
Total Cats: 9
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Perez View Post
Personal opinion, based on a sample-size of one.

For a street application, I'm unimpressed with sandwich-plate adapters with internal thermostats. They seem to pass a fair bit of oil through the cooler even when cold, with the result that warm up takes an extremely long time under normal driving, even with a turbocharged engine.
That's what I've read. Unfortunately I don't drive the car much on the street these days (dad life), and the few times I drive it it's to a local car meet or track day / drift event every few weeks. If this was a daily or strictly street driven car I wouldn't bother with a cooler, but on the track with the turbo, the car needs it bad. The car hits 260 degree oil temp pretty quickly, and takes some time to drop during cool down laps. I also have the singular motorsports hood vents on the way, they look horrible, but the car needs all the cooling mods.
robertw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2016, 12:14 PM   #15
Supporting Vendor
iTrader: (31)
 
Savington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
Posts: 13,511
Total Cats: 875
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Perez View Post
Personal opinion, based on a sample-size of one.

For a street application, I'm unimpressed with sandwich-plate adapters with internal thermostats. They seem to pass a fair bit of oil through the cooler even when cold, with the result that warmup takes an extremely long time under normal driving, even with a turbocharged engine.
The alternative is a thermostat which, when it opens, will briefly starve the engine of oil pressure. You have to maintain flow through the core at all times so that pressure fluctuation never happens.

And yes, I priced the cooler kits as low as I could. It's the magic of volume purchasing
Savington is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2016, 12:37 PM   #16
afm
Junior Member
iTrader: (3)
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Berkeley, CA
Posts: 426
Total Cats: 40
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Savington
And yes, I priced the cooler kits as low as I could. It's the magic of volume purchasing
Savingtons of money
afm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2016, 02:56 PM   #17
Newb
 
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 6
Total Cats: -1
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Perez View Post
Personal opinion, based on a sample-size of one.

For a street application, I'm unimpressed with sandwich-plate adapters with internal thermostats. They seem to pass a fair bit of oil through the cooler even when cold, with the result that warmup takes an extremely long time under normal driving, even with a turbocharged engine.
As mentioned it's flowing some oil through the core for a reason. The solution is to cover / block it off in the colder months. It's quite easy. There are some covers that snap on over the cooler. I've used cardboard and tape myself.

Oil cooler shrouds and radiator shrouds for winter driving | LBCarCo | Little British Car Co

Moss Miata also sells an oil cooler shroud.

Last edited by sp33der; 08-25-2016 at 04:15 PM.
sp33der is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-25-2016, 06:05 PM   #18
Boost Pope
iTrader: (8)
 
Joe Perez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 24,828
Total Cats: 1,602
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sp33der View Post
As mentioned it's flowing some oil through the core for a reason. The solution is to cover / block it off in the colder months.
For a car that does actual track duty and is also driven on the street, a perfect solution.


My comment was mostly about the need (or lack thereof) for external oil coolers on pure street cars which, at most, might see an occasional AutoX.

When I was younger, and naive, I built my first turbo car. It was a 1.6, so no factory oil cooler. Didn't know much about oil and cooling, but figured that it was probably something I needed to do.

Started with a Mocal plate and a small Earl's unit. Even in the summertime in SoCal, my oil wasn't up to temp at the end of my 5 miles commute to work.

Plugged the thermostat in the fully open position, and installed an external thermostat. Same problem.

Eventually ripped the whole mess out and installed an OEM 1.8 cooler from a junkyard car. This was the ticket- temps came up quickly in the morning, and never thought about getting too high even when I was pushing the car hard through the canyons on the weekend.


Not relevant to track use, just a commentary for anyone who might be reading this thread and thinking "Well, since the racers all use oil coolers on their turbo cars, I should probably install one on mine." For such applications, that's a worse solution than doing nothing.
Joe Perez is offline   Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
DIY Head Porting Madjak Engine Performance 45 08-30-2016 09:03 AM
Oil Leak After Turbo Install ScrapinMX5 Engine Performance 6 08-18-2016 11:52 AM
ABS plastic egr blockoff plate? speedf50 General Miata Chat 6 08-15-2016 11:05 AM
Oil Pan - What's a Torque Wrench? festersays General Miata Chat 3 08-13-2016 02:05 PM
Oil and Water lines ProjectDIY DIY Turbo Discussion 28 08-02-2016 07:13 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:27 AM.