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Old 11-20-2015, 01:36 PM   #21
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I sure as hell won't. (Or plan not to)

My gf and I have been talking about this lately. We grew up in kind of different families in this regard. My mom was very helicoptery and it got bad in college to a point where we stopped talking because all she would do was nag. She finally turned around and backed off, and our relationship has only improved.

On the other hand my gf's parents were very hands off, and she did everything like applying to college by herself, etc. I think she got lucky though and is very self motivated and organized, something I wasn't.

I have really bad ADHD (diagnosed when I was 8, in multiple environments, not just bad at school) and without being pushed and prodded I wouldn't be where I am today.

Somehow I turned out not to be a huge sissy though, and I'm not quite sure how they did it. I've always thought it was my dad. Grew up on a farm, never really went full hippy. He kept me working and doing manual labor, outdoors things, mechanicing, etc. Without him I'm pretty sure I would be a definite part of GenWu
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Old 11-20-2015, 01:40 PM   #22
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I was raised in this sense... knives, bb guns etc when I was a kid. I plan on letting my kid do whatever, hopefully they'll listen to warning if something really will hurt them

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Old 11-20-2015, 01:42 PM   #23
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That was like my dad and mom.

Dad buys me a bb gun, mom returns it. Dad buys me a knife, "don't tell mom"

Not sure if they planned it like that but I think it kinda worked for me.
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Old 11-20-2015, 01:46 PM   #24
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LOLed IRL @ "It's a sword. They're not meant to be safe."
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Old 11-20-2015, 01:54 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Joe Perez View Post
It's a lack of awareness of that fundamental interconnectedness which I find most startling when I contemplate American society as compared to that of certain western European nations which I've had the pleasure of working in.
I even give coworkers a warning as to what to expect when they approach my cube:

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Old 11-20-2015, 04:13 PM   #26
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^That's great.

I think we should work on popularizing Generation Wu as a term for them.
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Old 11-24-2015, 07:06 PM   #27
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Next thing you know, they're going to change the name of Rapeseed oil to something stupid like Canola oil, because using the word "Rape" in the name of a kitchen ingredient might be a "trigger" for some special snowflake (despite the fact that "rape" in this context, comes from the Latin word meaning "turnip.")


Oh, wait... Nevermind.


Canola oil used to be called RAPESEED oil but the name was changed for marketing reasons
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Old 11-24-2015, 09:05 PM   #28
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I knew that. It was a marketing plan started in Canada. Canola the marketing combination of the words Canadian oil.
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Old 11-24-2015, 09:23 PM   #29
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And in the US, "Dead End" streets have been renamed "no exit" because the old phrase has been used to describe lives going nowhere, but now the idiom could be offensive to people living on the actual street.
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Old 11-24-2015, 10:18 PM   #30
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I just read a news article which talked about how a bunch of fat women are all up in arms about the fact that US retailer Abercrombie & Fitch does not sell clothes larger than womens' size 10. They accuse the retailer of being exclusionist, body-shaming, etc.


Now, I run into a similar problem all the time. It's really hard to find a store that stocks a decent variety of shoes in mens' size 14. But that's apparently OK, since being fat is a choice, whereas there's absolutely nothing I can do about the size of my feet.


Wait, what?
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Old 11-29-2015, 12:58 PM   #31
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In College and Hiding From Scary Ideas

MARCH 21, 2015



KATHERINE BYRON, a senior at Brown University and a member of its Sexual Assault Task Force, considers it her duty to make Brown a safe place for rape victims, free from anything that might prompt memories of trauma.

So when she heard last fall that a student group had organized a debate about campus sexual assault between Jessica Valenti, the founder of feministing.com, and Wendy McElroy, a libertarian, and that Ms. McElroy was likely to criticize the term “rape culture,” Ms. Byron was alarmed. “Bringing in a speaker like that could serve to invalidate people’s experiences,” she told me. It could be “damaging.”

Ms. Byron and some fellow task force members secured a meeting with administrators. Not long after, Brown’s president, Christina H. Paxson, announced that the university would hold a simultaneous, competing talk to provide “research and facts” about “the role of culture in sexual assault.” Meanwhile, student volunteers put up posters advertising that a “safe space” would be available for anyone who found the debate too upsetting.

The safe space, Ms. Byron explained, was intended to give people who might find comments “troubling” or “triggering,” a place to recuperate. The room was equipped with cookies, coloring books, bubbles, Play-Doh, calming music, pillows, blankets and a video of frolicking puppies, as well as students and staff members trained to deal with trauma. Emma Hall, a junior, rape survivor and “sexual assault peer educator” who helped set up the room and worked in it during the debate, estimates that a couple of dozen people used it. At one point she went to the lecture hall — it was packed — but after a while, she had to return to the safe space. “I was feeling bombarded by a lot of viewpoints that really go against my dearly and closely held beliefs,” Ms. Hall said.

Safe spaces are an expression of the conviction, increasingly prevalent among college students, that their schools should keep them from being “bombarded” by discomfiting or distressing viewpoints. Think of the safe space as the live-action version of the better-known trigger warning, a notice put on top of a syllabus or an assigned reading to alert students to the presence of potentially disturbing material.

Some people trace safe spaces back to the feminist consciousness-raising groups of the 1960s and 1970s, others to the gay and lesbian movement of the early 1990s. In most cases, safe spaces are innocuous gatherings of like-minded people who agree to refrain from ridicule, criticism or what they term microaggressions — subtle displays of racial or sexual bias — so that everyone can relax enough to explore the nuances of, say, a fluid gender identity. As long as all parties consent to such restrictions, these little islands of self-restraint seem like a perfectly fine idea.



But the notion that ticklish conversations must be scrubbed clean of controversy has a way of leaking out and spreading. Once you designate some spaces as safe, you imply that the rest are unsafe. It follows that they should be made safer.

This logic clearly informed a campaign undertaken this fall by a Columbia University student group called Everyone Allied Against Homophobia that consisted of slipping a flier under the door of every dorm room on campus. The headline of the flier stated, “I want this space to be a safer space.” The text below instructed students to tape the fliers to their windows. The group’s vice president then had the flier published in the Columbia Daily Spectator, the student newspaper, along with an editorial asserting that “making spaces safer is about learning how to be kind to each other.”

A junior named Adam Shapiro decided he didn’t want his room to be a safer space. He printed up his own flier calling it a dangerous space and had that, too, published in the Columbia Daily Spectator. “Kindness alone won’t allow us to gain more insight into truth,” he wrote. In an interview, Mr. Shapiro said, “If the point of a safe space is therapy for people who feel victimized by traumatization, that sounds like a great mission.” But a safe-space mentality has begun infiltrating classrooms, he said, making both professors and students loath to say anything that might hurt someone’s feelings. “I don’t see how you can have a therapeutic space that’s also an intellectual space,” he said.

I’m old enough to remember a time when college students objected to providing a platform to certain speakers because they were deemed politically unacceptable. Now students worry whether acts of speech or pieces of writing may put them in emotional peril. Two weeks ago, students at Northwestern University marched to protest an article by Laura Kipnis, a professor in the university’s School of Communication. Professor Kipnis had criticized — O.K., ridiculed — what she called the sexual paranoia pervading campus life.

The protesters carried mattresses and demanded that the administration condemn the essay. One student complained that Professor Kipnis was “erasing the very traumatic experience” of victims who spoke out. An organizer of the demonstration said, “we need to be setting aside spaces to talk” about “victim-blaming.” Last Wednesday, Northwestern’s president, Morton O. Schapiro, wrote an op-ed article in The Wall Street Journal affirming his commitment to academic freedom. But plenty of others at universities are willing to dignify students’ fears, citing threats to their stability as reasons to cancel debates, disinvite commencement speakers and apologize for so-called mistakes.

At Oxford University’s Christ Church college in November, the college censors (a “censor” being more or less the Oxford equivalent of an undergraduate dean) canceled a debate on abortion after campus feminists threatened to disrupt it because both would-be debaters were men. “I’m relieved the censors have made this decision,” said the treasurer of Christ Church’s student union, who had pressed for the cancellation. “It clearly makes the most sense for the safety — both physical and mental — of the students who live and work in Christ Church.”

A year and a half ago, a Hampshire College student group disinvited an Afrofunk band that had been attacked on social media for having too many white musicians; the vitriolic discussion had made students feel “unsafe.”

Last fall, the president of Smith College, Kathleen McCartney, apologized for causing students and faculty to be “hurt” when she failed to object to a racial epithet uttered by a fellow panel member at an alumnae event in New York. The offender was the free-speech advocate Wendy Kaminer, who had been arguing against the use of the euphemism “the n-word” when teaching American history or “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” In the uproar that followed, the Student Government Association wrote a letter declaring that “if Smith is unsafe for one student, it is unsafe for all students.”

“It’s amazing to me that they can’t distinguish between racist speech and speech about racist speech, between racism and discussions of racism,” Ms. Kaminer said in an email.

The confusion is telling, though. It shows that while keeping college-level discussions “safe” may feel good to the hypersensitive, it’s bad for them and for everyone else. People ought to go to college to sharpen their wits and broaden their field of vision. Shield them from unfamiliar ideas, and they’ll never learn the discipline of seeing the world as other people see it. They’ll be unprepared for the social and intellectual headwinds that will hit them as soon as they step off the campuses whose climates they have so carefully controlled. What will they do when they hear opinions they’ve learned to shrink from? If they want to change the world, how will they learn to persuade people to join them?

Only a few of the students want stronger anti-hate-speech codes. Mostly they ask for things like mandatory training sessions and stricter enforcement of existing rules. Still, it’s disconcerting to see students clamor for a kind of intrusive supervision that would have outraged students a few generations ago. But those were hardier souls. Now students’ needs are anticipated by a small army of service professionals — mental health counselors, student-life deans and the like. This new bureaucracy may be exacerbating students’ “self-infantilization,” as Judith Shapiro, the former president of Barnard College, suggested in an essay for Inside Higher Ed.

But why are students so eager to self-infantilize? Their parents should probably share the blame. Eric Posner, a professor at the University of Chicago Law School, wrote on Slate last month that although universities cosset students more than they used to, that’s what they have to do, because today’s undergraduates are more puerile than their predecessors. “Perhaps overprogrammed children engineered to the specifications of college admissions offices no longer experience the risks and challenges that breed maturity,” he wrote. But “if college students are children, then they should be protected like children.”

Another reason students resort to the quasi-medicalized terminology of trauma is that it forces administrators to respond. Universities are in a double bind. They’re required by two civil-rights statutes, Title VII and Title IX, to ensure that their campuses don’t create a “hostile environment” for women and other groups subject to harassment. However, universities are not supposed to go too far in suppressing free speech, either. If a university cancels a talk or punishes a professor and a lawsuit ensues, history suggests that the university will lose. But if officials don’t censure or don’t prevent speech that may inflict psychological damage on a member of a protected class, they risk fostering a hostile environment and prompting an investigation. As a result, students who say they feel unsafe are more likely to be heard than students who demand censorship on other grounds.

The theory that vulnerable students should be guaranteed psychological security has roots in a body of legal thought elaborated in the 1980s and 1990s and still read today. Feminist and anti-racist legal scholars argued that the First Amendment should not safeguard language that inflicted emotional injury through racist or sexist stigmatization. One scholar, Mari J. Matsuda, was particularly insistent that college students not be subjected to “the violence of the word” because many of them “are away from home for the first time and at a vulnerable stage of psychological development.” If they’re targeted and the university does nothing to help them, they will be “left to their own resources in coping with the damage wrought.” That might have, she wrote, “lifelong repercussions.”

Perhaps. But Ms. Matsuda doesn’t seem to have considered the possibility that insulating students could also make them, well, insular. A few weeks ago, Zineb El Rhazoui, a journalist at Charlie Hebdo, spoke at the University of Chicago, protected by the security guards she has traveled with since supporters of the Islamic State issued death threats against her. During the question-and-answer period, a Muslim student stood up to object to the newspaper’s apparent disrespect for Muslims and to express her dislike of the phrase “I am Charlie.”

Ms. El Rhazoui replied, somewhat irritably, “Being Charlie Hebdo means to die because of a drawing,” and not everyone has the guts to do that (although she didn’t use the word guts). She lives under constant threat, Ms. El Rhazoui said. The student answered that she felt threatened, too.

A few days later, a guest editorialist in the student newspaper took Ms. El Rhazoui to task. She had failed to ensure “that others felt safe enough to express dissenting opinions.” Ms. El Rhazoui’s “relative position of power,” the writer continued, had granted her a “free pass to make condescending attacks on a member of the university.” In a letter to the editor, the president and the vice president of the University of Chicago French Club, which had sponsored the talk, shot back, saying, “El Rhazoui is an immigrant, a woman, Arab, a human-rights activist who has known exile, and a journalist living in very real fear of death. She was invited to speak precisely because her right to do so is, quite literally, under threat.”

You’d be hard-pressed to avoid the conclusion that the student and her defender had burrowed so deep inside their cocoons, were so overcome by their own fragility, that they couldn’t see that it was Ms. El Rhazoui who was in need of a safer space.

Judith Shulevitz is a contributing opinion writer and the author of “The Sabbath World: Glimpses of a Different Order of Time.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/22/op...deas.html?_r=0
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Old 11-30-2015, 09:43 PM   #32
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This is Not a Day Care. It’s a University!

Dr. Everett Piper, President

Oklahoma Wesleyan University


This past week, I actually had a student come forward after a university chapel service and complain because he felt “victimized” by a sermon on the topic of 1 Corinthians 13. It appears that this young scholar felt offended because a homily on love made him feel bad for not showing love. In his mind, the speaker was wrong for making him, and his peers, feel uncomfortable.

I’m not making this up. Our culture has actually taught our kids to be this self-absorbed and narcissistic. Any time their feelings are hurt, they are the victims. Anyone who dares challenge them and, thus, makes them “feel bad” about themselves, is a “hater,” a “bigot,” an “oppressor,” and a “victimizer.”

I have a message for this young man and all others who care to listen. That feeling of discomfort you have after listening to a sermon is called a conscience. An altar call is supposed to make you feel bad. It is supposed to make you feel guilty. The goal of many a good sermon is to get you to confess your sins—not coddle you in your selfishness. The primary objective of the Church and the Christian faith is your confession, not your self-actualization.

So here’s my advice:

If you want the chaplain to tell you you’re a victim rather than tell you that you need virtue, this may not be the university you’re looking for. If you want to complain about a sermon that makes you feel less than loving for not showing love, this might be the wrong place.

If you’re more interested in playing the “hater” card than you are in confessing your own hate; if you want to arrogantly lecture, rather than humbly learn; if you don’t want to feel guilt in your soul when you are guilty of sin; if you want to be enabled rather than confronted, there are many universities across the land (in Missouri and elsewhere) that will give you exactly what you want, but Oklahoma Wesleyan isn’t one of them.

At OKWU, we teach you to be selfless rather than self-centered. We are more interested in you practicing personal forgiveness than political revenge. We want you to model interpersonal reconciliation rather than foment personal conflict. We believe the content of your character is more important than the color of your skin. We don’t believe that you have been victimized every time you feel guilty and we don’t issue “trigger warnings” before altar calls.

Oklahoma Wesleyan is not a “safe place”, but rather, a place to learn: to learn that life isn’t about you, but about others; that the bad feeling you have while listening to a sermon is called guilt; that the way to address it is to repent of everything that’s wrong with you rather than blame others for everything that’s wrong with them. This is a place where you will quickly learn that you need to grow up.

This is not a day care. This is a university!

http://www.okwu.edu/blog/2015/11/thi...-a-university/
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Old 11-30-2015, 09:48 PM   #33
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College is the last place that should be a ‘safe space': A voice of protest against student protests

By Hannah Oh, Steven Glick and Taylor Schmitt November 16


Steven Glick, publisher; Hannah Oh, editor-in-chief; and Taylor Schmitt, managing editor of the Claremont Independent, the right-leaning publication of the Claremont colleges.


Students are protesting at campuses across the country, more fervently than ever in the wake of demonstrations at the University of Missouri that forced the resignations of the university system president and the chancellor last week.

At Claremont McKenna College, students who have been raising awareness about race issues on campus presented a list of demands to the president Wednesday, including asking the dean of students to step down. One particular objection centered around an e-mail the dean, Mary Spellman, sent to a Latina student pledging to work with those who don’t fit the “CMC mold,” a phrase her opponents echoed in angry protests. On Thursday, Spellman resigned.

The president of the junior class, Kris Brackmann, resigned after another student posted a photo of her with a group wearing Halloween costumes many found offensive, including two blond women wearing stereotypical Mexican sombreros and giant black mustaches; the student wrote in her post that this exemplified what people of color are faced with on the campus. (Brackmann was not in a sombrero; she was wearing a costume drawn from a Justin Bieber video.)

As protests continued, three students sent an alternative message. Hannah Oh is the editor-in-chief, Steven Glick is the publisher, and Taylor Schmitt is the managing editor of the Claremont Independent, the right-leaning publication of the Claremont colleges.

Oh is a senior at Claremont McKenna College, and Glick and Schmitt are juniors at Pomona College, one of the other member institutions of the Claremont University Consortium. “We try to fill in the gaps in campus dialogue that are left by the overwhelmingly progressive political atmosphere on campus,” they wrote.

Here is their take on the protests at Claremont McKenna, excerpts from an opinion piece titled, “We dissent” which ran in the Claremont Independent:



By Hannah Oh, Steven Glick and Taylor Schmitt

The student protests that have swept through Claremont McKenna College (CMC) over the past few days—and the ensuing fallout—have made us disappointed in many of those involved.

First, former Dean Mary Spellman. We are sorry that your career had to end this way, as the email in contention was a clear case of good intentions being overlooked because of poor phrasing. However, we are disappointed in you as well.

We are disappointed that you allowed a group of angry students to bully you into resignation.

We are disappointed that you taught Claremont students that reacting with emotion and anger will force the administration to act.

… We are disappointed that you and President [Hiram] Chodosh put up with students yelling and swearing at you for an hour. You could have made this a productive dialogue, but instead you humored the students and allowed them to get caught up in the furor.

Above all, we are disappointed that you and President Chodosh weren’t brave enough to come to the defense of a student who was told she was “derailing” because her opinions regarding racism didn’t align with those of the mob around her.

… These protesters were asking you to protect your students, but you didn’t even defend the one who needed to be protected right in front of you.

Second, President Chodosh. We were disappointed to see you idly stand by and watch students berate, curse at, and attack Dean Spellman for being a “racist.” …

[That] only further reinforced the fear among the student body to speak out against this movement. We needed your leadership more than ever this week, and you failed us miserably.

Third, [the president of student government] …. we are disappointed in you for the manner in which you called for the resignation of junior class president Kris Brackmann and for so quickly caving in to the demands of a few students without consulting the student body as a whole. …

We are disappointed that you did not allow for any time for reflection before making your quick executive decisions to announce a student-wide endorsement of this movement and to grant these students a temporary “safe space” in the [student government] offices.

To our fellow Claremont students, we are disappointed in you as well.

We are ashamed of you for trying to end someone’s career over a poorly worded email. This is not a political statement––this is a person’s livelihood that you so carelessly sought to destroy.

We are disappointed that you chose to scream and swear at your administrators.

That is not how adults solve problems, and your behavior reflects poorly on all of us here in Claremont. This is not who we are and this is not how we conduct ourselves, but this is the image of us that has now reached the national stage.

We are disappointed in your demands. If you want to take a class in “ethnic, racial, and sexuality theory,” feel free to take one, but don’t force such an ideologically driven course on all CMC students. …

And though it wouldn’t hurt to have a more diverse faculty, the demand that CMC increase the number of minority faculty members either rests on the assumption that CMC has a history of discriminating against qualified professors of color, or, more realistically, it advocates for the hiring of less qualified faculty based simply on the fact that they belong to marginalized groups. A hiring practice of this sort would not benefit any CMC students, yourselves included.

We are disappointed in the fact that your movement has successfully managed to convince its members that anyone who dissents does so not for intelligent reasons, but due to moral failure or maliciousness.

We are disappointed that you’ve used phrases like “silence is violence” to not only demonize those who oppose you, but all who are not actively supporting you.

We are most disappointed, however, in the rhetoric surrounding “safe spaces.”

College is the last place that should be a safe space. We come here to learn about views that differ from our own, and if we aren’t made to feel uncomfortable by these ideas, then perhaps we aren’t venturing far enough outside of our comfort zone.

We would be doing ourselves a disservice to ignore viewpoints solely on the grounds that they may make us uncomfortable, and we would not be preparing ourselves to cope well with adversity in the future.

Dealing with ideas that make us uncomfortable is an important part of growing as students and as people, and your ideas will inhibit opportunities for that growth. …

Lastly, we are disappointed in students like ourselves, who were scared into silence.

We are not racist for having different opinions.

We are not immoral because we don’t buy the flawed rhetoric of a spiteful movement.

We are not evil because we don’t want this movement to tear across our campuses completely unchecked.

We are no longer afraid to be voices of dissent.





https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...dent-protests/
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Old 11-30-2015, 10:12 PM   #34
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This is Not a Day Care. It’s a University!
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Old 12-01-2015, 11:13 AM   #35
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Open rambling letter to weak Millennials:

Stop whining. Harden the **** up. You being a ***** doesn't mean the rest of the world is full of "haters". It just means you are a coddled ***** woefully unprepared to deal with the world on its terms. And the world will be dictating its terms to you, not the other way around. Your parents have failed you if you need a "safe space." The world will devour you and **** you out on the pavement because you are weak-minded and unable to find resilience within. You are destined to be the 40 year old residing within your mother's basement, cowering behind your fortress of participation trophies. Rabbits and sheep have their place in the food chain right along side you. Rest assured you will be devoured by those better equipped for survival.
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Old 12-01-2015, 02:36 PM   #36
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For thin-skinned students, we have nobody to blame but ourselves
By Kathleen Parker Opinion writer November 24



Students stage a sit-in at Georgetown University on Nov. 13 in solidarity with other student protests around the country.



It would be easy to call protesting college students crybabies and brats for pitching hissy fits over hurt feelings, but this likely would lead to such torrents of tearful tribulation that the nation’s university system would have to shut down for a prolonged period of grief counseling.

Besides, it would be insensitive.

Instead, let me be the first to say: it’s not the students’ fault. These serial tantrums are direct results of our Everybody Gets a Trophy culture and an educational system that, for the most part, no longer teaches a core curriculum, including history, government and the Bill of Rights.

The students simply don’t know any better.

This isn’t necessarily to excuse them. Everyone has a choice whether to ignore a perceived slight — or to form a posse. But as with any problem, it helps to understand its source. The disease, I fear, was auto-induced with the zealous pampering of the American child that began a few decades ago.

The first sign of the epidemic of sensitivity we’re witnessing was when parents and teachers were instructed never to tell Johnny that he’s a “bad boy,” but that he’s “acting” like a bad boy.

Next, Johnny was handed a blue ribbon along with everyone else on the team even though he didn’t deserve one. This had the opposite effect of what was intended. Rather than protecting Johnny’s fragile self-esteem, the prize undermined Johnny’s faith in his own perceptions and judgment. It robbed him of his ability to pick himself up when he fell and to be brave, honest and hardy in the face of adversity.

Self-esteem is earned, not bestowed.

Today’s campuses are overrun with little Johnnys, their female counterparts and their adult enablers. How will we ever find enough fainting couches?

Lest anyone feel slighted so soon, this is also not to diminish the pain of racism (or sexism, ageism, blondism or whatever -ism gets one’s tear ducts moistened). But nothing reported on campuses the past several weeks rises to the level of the coerced resignations of a university chancellor and president.

The affronts that prompted students to demand the resignations include: a possibly off-campus, drive-by racial epithet apparently aimed at the student body president; another racial epithet , hurled by a drunk white student; a swastika drawn with feces in a dorm restroom.

Someone certainly deserves a spanking — or psychoanalysis. Sigmund Freud had plenty to say about people who play with the products of their alimentary canal.

But do such events mean that students have been neglected, as protesters have charged? Or that the school tolerates racism?

Concurrent with these episodes of outrage is the recent surge on campuses of “trigger warnings” in syllabuses to alert students to content that might be upsetting, and “safe spaces ” where students can seek refuge when ideas make them uncomfortable. It seems absurd to have to mention that the purpose of higher education is to be challenged, to be exposed to different views and, above all, to be exhilarated by the exercise of free speech — other people’s as well as one’s own.

The marketplace of ideas is not for sissies, in other words. And it would appear that knowledge, the curse of the enlightened, is not for everyone.

The latter is meant to be an observation, but on many college campuses today, it seems to be an operating principle. A recent survey of 1,100 colleges and universities found that only 18 percent require American history or government, where such foundational premises as the First Amendment might be explained and understood.

The survey, by the American Council of Trustees and Alumni, assesses schools according to whether they have at least one required course in composition, foreign language at the intermediate level, American government or history, economics, science, mathematics and literature. Coincidentally, the very institutions where students are dominating what passes for debate also scored among the worst: Missouri, D; Yale, C; Dartmouth, C; and Princeton, C — all for requiring only one or a few of the subjects. Amherst scored an F for requiring none of them.

Such is the world we’ve created for young people who soon enough will discover that the world doesn’t much care about their tender feelings. But before such harsh realities knock them off their ponies, we might hope that they redirect their anger. They have every right to despise the coddling culture that ill prepared them for life and an educational system that has failed to teach them what they need to know.

Weep for them — and us.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...a97_story.html
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Old 12-01-2015, 06:05 PM   #37
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Spare the rod and spoil the child. These brats need a good spanking.
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Old 12-01-2015, 06:49 PM   #38
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Friend and I were discussing this earlier. We need to start pro bullying rallies. Bring back bullying. Not the beat up nerds in the locker room bullying, but the name calling, eye for an eye, good old fashioned bullying.
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Old 12-01-2015, 09:42 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by rleete View Post
Spare the rod and spoil the child. These brats need a good spanking.
I suspect that quite a few spankings will be gotten shortly after they leave school and have to confront the world. Work is supposed to suck - that's why they have to pay us. But not working can suck worse, especially if Mom and Dad can't carry you indefinitely. Sadly for the brats, it will be a hard lesson coming way too late.
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Old 12-02-2015, 01:11 PM   #40
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just placing guessing on the next NFC-E rivalry game:





i took this pic so when i change all the score guesses to a draw (since there's no losers in life), ill remember them.
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