COPs for Dummies... a writeup - Miata Turbo Forum - Boost cars, acquire cats.

Welcome to Miataturbo.net   Members
 


General Miata Chat A place to talk about anything Miata

Reply
 
 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-29-2008, 01:43 AM   #1
Elite Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (7)
 
samnavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Posts: 6,020
Total Cats: 175
Default COPs for Dummies... a writeup

COPS for dummies:

The following write-up is an attempt to consolidate my experience with my conversion to COPs. It’s a fairly comprehensive accumulation of everything I did to make mine work. In the end, it really didn’t take anything to make it “work”, just fab the harness and plug it in. But it took me awhile to get everything in order and start the job. Hopefully this helps some other guys on the fence. There is going to be a certain amount of insulting your intelligence in this thread, but it’s things I screwed up, so hopefully something in here saves each of you who are going to do this a little time and effort. Here goes.

My setup is a 1.6 running Megasquirt standalone, so be sure when you make your harness, you are following the correct diagram in the first link below.

Here are some links:
The original DIY COP by Braineack in "useful saved posts:
THREAD#1: https://www.miataturbo.net/forum/showthread.php?t=12704
The continuing monster COP thread in the DIY forum:
THREAD#2: https://www.miataturbo.net/forum/showthread.php?t=4756
My original I Love COPs thread:
THREAD#3: https://www.miataturbo.net/forum/showthread.php?t=18565

I also highly recommend you do a title search for COP and COPS and read all the most recent threads about the subject to be sure there isn’t something new that we’ve discovered.

I purchased 4x 2000 Corolla 1ZZFE COPs from a described 10k mile car. They were in perfect condition and came with the fuel injectors from the Corolla that’ I’ll try to unload on eBay. I paid $60.

I purchased 5 connectors from the source in THREAD#1. I wish I’d bought nine. During some experimentation, I hurt one of them bad and couldn’t use it. Then I didn’t really like my first wiring harness and wished I’d had 4 more to make another one and do it perfect. I recommend you buy 9 connectors. One is to screw up, and then you have enough to make 2 full harnesses.

I got my connector pins from Brain, but he’s out. You’ll need to buy yours from the source in THREAD#1. You’ll need 16pins, but I recommend you just buy 100 and you’ll have enough for 2 harnesses, plus screwups, plus you can hook a bro up who might need some local to you.

The wire I bought at RadioShack. It’s an 18 guage 3-pack. I noticed that the individual copper strands of each RED/BLACK/GREEN wire are different. The BLACK wire is just 5 or 6 heavy strands, while the red one is about 30 hair-thin strands… the GREEN one is in the middle. I used the BLACK for GROUND and TRIGGER. The RED for 12vlt, and the GREEN for TACH.

I bought a spare ignitor from a forum member. In the end, the ignitor was way more pain than it’s worth. Soldering the wires to the leads in the ignitor is a chore I wouldn’t wish on anybody. My experienced recommendation is to just solder some wire-ends onto each wire and and connect them directly to the harness, leave the damn ignitor out of the loop.

My Megasquirt standalone required a resistor to facilitate the tach signal. The best place to put it is in the DIAGNOSTICS BOX. I cover this thoroughly in THREAD#2.

To make sure you’re fab’ing the harness the proper length, I made a template on some cardboard and placed the COPS on it in the exact separation they’ll be installed. Each wire I cut and soldered I just made it the appropriate length by measuring the distance with the COPs sitting right in front of me. The distances don’t have to be down to the exact millimeter, but within ½” or so. Don’t forget to space out your splices on each wire. The last thing you want is a 1” diameter cluster of splices all in the same spot on the harness… just spread them out ½” or so, and don’t forget that the shrink-wrap will give the splice a little extra girth as well.

STEP#1: Lay out the wire and start cutting/stripping/soldering. I put all my connector pins on as I went… and made sure I when I put them on, they were already as lined up as I could make them, so I didn’t have to twist the short 1” piece of wire coming off the main harness 180* to fit into the connector right-side-up.
DON’T FORGET TO SLIDE YOUR SHRINK WRAP ON BEFORE SOLDERING!
If you’ve never soldered wire before, just practice a little. The key to soldering is that solder isn’t paint. You don’t solder over the top of the wires… you get the wire hot enough that the solder soaks into the wire and bonds each strand together. There’s a series of pictures that shows this perfectly.

STEP#2: You can actually do this well before step 1. Once you’ve got the harness fab’d up, you need to Dremel a little bit off of each pin so it’ll seat properly. Reference the pic. I wish I’d done this while they were all still all on the factory strip so I could make them all perfectly uniform. However, I waited until the harness was done and did them just holding each one in my hand while I Dremeled. Not to big a pain, but it would have been easier/faster/better to do them on the strip.

STEP#3: Pushing the pins into the connectors. They’ll only go in ONE WAY. And they’ll click in place. If you push them in as far as they’ll go and don’t hear a click, then you probably didn’t Dremel enough off. They also don’t seat very tightly once they’re in… the pins will wiggle around in the connector a bit. Also, once you put a pin in the connector, IT’S IN THERE!. And you’ll destroy the connector if you pull on it hard enough to pull it out. That’s why you buy a few extra.

STEP#4: Don’t forget the extra Ground wire. You'll want to place your harness roughly in place on top of the valve cover to see where exactly you want to splice it in. I think mine is about 6" past the #4 connector... enough room to route the harness through the brake vaccum hardline and the fuel lines. Just make the ground splice itself a foot long and trim it to perfection later.

STEP#5: Gutting the ignitor. I made 5 small holes in the back of my ignitor instead of 1 big one… made sense for the wires to come out of it as straight as possible. The middle hole was slightly bigger as it included 2 wires. But again, I recommend you skip the ignitor and just put wire-ends on.
The metal ignitor cover is on there pretty good. I didn’t drill mine as recommended, but rather put a small flat-blade screwdriver in the bolt-hole and pried one side up… then used the screwdriver along the edge. The inside of the ignitor box is covered with this jelly-like cummy sticky stuff. It sucks… and it sucks some more. There are also some metal pins that may be stuck to the cover. Just pull them off gently, you don’t need the flimsy bendy little pieces of metal stuck to the main ends. Once the little bendy pieces are pulled off, gently pry the ends up and straighten them so they’re sticking straight out… makes for easier soldering.
Then do your best soldering on the ends. It’s tough in there with the shrink wrap. You get the soldering iron close enough to it that it shrinks just a little and you may have the nip the shrunk end of the wrap to get it to slide over your connection.
It’s also recommended to Epoxy your wires inside the ignitor… I just wrapped the gutted ignitor in electrical tape seated it back down in the stock location.

STEP#6: Now that the harness is finished, test it.
Pull the spark plug wires.
Unplug the coil pack.
Unplug the ignitor.
Drop in your COPs.
Connect the harness to the COPs.
Ground the harness.
Plug in the gutted ignitor, or just slip on your wire ends.
Install resistor in Diagnostics box if necessary.
Turn Key.
If it fires, move on…if not, troubleshoot.

STEP#7:
I wrapped my entire harness in electrical tape… over to you how you want to finish it. I may get some plastic corrugated wire wrap to make things neat, but not this week.

Last edited by samnavy; 03-29-2008 at 01:46 PM.
samnavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 01:44 AM   #2
Elite Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (7)
 
samnavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Posts: 6,020
Total Cats: 175
Default

STEP#8:
Making the COPs seat perfectly. COPs come in lotsa shapes. The Toyota ones are real easy to modify with a Dremel to any shape you want. I modified them a lot… basically just by removing the small bracket on them that holds them in place on the Corolla. You want them to seat perfectly flat in the valve cover channel. But you’ll probably find they’re about 1mm-2mm’s too wide. A little flattening of opposite sides will allow them to fully seat onto the valve cover. The rubber seal will allow a little compression, but make sure the walls aren’t pinching the COP and holding it up. Be sure to flatten out the rubber seal in the same area as you’re removing plastic… that’ll ensure the seal doesn’t bow.

STEP#9:
Once the COPs will seat flat, you’ve gotta find a way to keep them in place. You can engineer whatever method you want. Some guys weld or JBweld individual nuts onto the valve cover, or drill completely through it and use a threaded post. That’s too much work for me. I don’t know how it can get any simpler than what I did.
The key to the way I did it is that the 3 bolts in the middle still need to keep pressure on the center of the valve cover to make sure it seats tight to the head. You want the locking plate hold the COPs in place, but not be under any pressure of actually holding the valve cover to the head. The pressure of holding the valve cover to the head now rests on the brass spacers. If you grab the COP, you can still wiggle it a little with some force, but it’s pushed the perfect pressure down against the rubber seal.
The spacers are made from a piece of 5/16” round brass stock, but there are options depending on what they have at your hardware store… I bought all my stuff at Taylors’ DIY Center.
The hold-down piece is just a piece of 1" mild steel stock. It's not real thick, but stiff enough not to bend too much when pushing down on the COPs. I wanted a brass piece, but they' weren't long enough. You could just as easily use aluminum.
The holes on the valve cover are 6x1.0x80mm metric. I found an 80mm bolt length was just a little too long, so I cut a few threads off. The holes in the head that the bolts insert into are finite in depth, so you actually do have to monitor the length of the bolt, or it’ll be all the way in, and not be touching the plate yet. It’s just a little trial and error. Measure the depth, cut the spacers, install… cut spacers down a little, install… cut spacers a little more… bolt bottoms out… Dremel another 2 threads off bolt… install… cut spacer one last time…. Ahhhhh pefect.

STEP#10: Remove the coil-pack.
This step is not necessary. You could simply remove the plugwires.
The coil-pack is held in by 3 bolts. 2 are on the front sides, 12mm, very easy. The one in the back, 12mm, is a bitch. A box-end or open end is your only option. I had to drain my radiator and pull the heater core hoses to get enough room to make it happen. I also just left the plug wires on it in case I ever need to re-install, one less thing to look up. Tuck the stock wires for the coil-pack down below the CAS.

STEP#11: Install everything permanently.

You’re done. My beautiful black crinkle valve cover is another story.

There are a lot of pics… you should be able to match them up with the steps.
Attached Thumbnails
COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01063-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01068-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01056-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01072-small-.jpg  
samnavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 01:45 AM   #3
Elite Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (7)
 
samnavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Posts: 6,020
Total Cats: 175
Default

More...
Attached Thumbnails
COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01074-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01075-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01077-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01081-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01082-small-.jpg  

samnavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 01:47 AM   #4
Elite Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (7)
 
samnavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Posts: 6,020
Total Cats: 175
Default

And more...
Attached Thumbnails
COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01057-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01059-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01061-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01086-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01088-small-.jpg  

samnavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 01:48 AM   #5
Elite Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (7)
 
samnavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Posts: 6,020
Total Cats: 175
Default

Some more...
Attached Thumbnails
COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01089-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01103-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01098-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01091-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01095-small-.jpg  

samnavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 01:49 AM   #6
Elite Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (7)
 
samnavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Posts: 6,020
Total Cats: 175
Default

Wait, theres more...
Attached Thumbnails
COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01100-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01107-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01109-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01108-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01113-small-.jpg  

samnavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 01:50 AM   #7
Elite Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (7)
 
samnavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Posts: 6,020
Total Cats: 175
Default

And I'm spent...
Attached Thumbnails
COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01115-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01116-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01112-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01118-small-.jpg   COPs for Dummies... a writeup-dsc01122-small-.jpg  

samnavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 02:15 AM   #8
Elite Member
iTrader: (15)
 
patsmx5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Houston, TX
Posts: 8,793
Total Cats: 247
Default

Wowsers, nice rightup! Your valvecover looks great.
patsmx5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 03:12 AM   #9
Elite Member
iTrader: (15)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Incline Village, NV
Posts: 2,073
Total Cats: 5
Default

ill be following this, thanks
thesnowboarder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 11:29 AM   #10
y8s
2 Props,3 Dildos,& 1 Cat
iTrader: (8)
 
y8s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Fake Virginia
Posts: 19,038
Total Cats: 406
Default

Sam nice write up. Truly a SpamNavy quality post. A couple of notes for posterity:

1. To remove the pins, pull the white locking clip out of the conneciton side of the connector. Then reach in with a narrow flat blade screwdriver and gently lift the black plastic springy tab up from the pin (it snaps into place behind where you dremel). The pins should pull out easily if you get it right.

2. Soldered connections in a car are not as reliable as crimp connections. Solder connections create a stiff joint immediately adjacent to a flexible wire that can vibrate and break over time due to fatigue

I recommend using high quality, high temp crimp connectors sized for the application. I think 18 AWG sized ones are red. The good Nylon ones are translucent red and much more durable than the vinyl solid brick red colored ones. Better yet, you can get heat shrinkable self-sealing versions of these for a little more dough. Worth the price for reliability. Google "heat shrink butt crimp" to find them.
y8s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 01:14 PM   #11
Junior Member
iTrader: (1)
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: South Florida
Posts: 491
Total Cats: -1
Default

The "crimped vs soldered" debate has been going on for quite some time...

Part of the argument is the "stiff joint next to flexible wire". Well let me think here...in a crimped wire, don't you have the crimped section aka "stiff joint" followed by flexible wire?

By the way, I have never seen a soldered joint fail but have seen countless of crimped wires corroded right through.

Call me old school, but I will stick with soldered connections and proper routing of the wiring harness.

Tony
mrtonyg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 01:28 PM   #12
y8s
2 Props,3 Dildos,& 1 Cat
iTrader: (8)
 
y8s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Fake Virginia
Posts: 19,038
Total Cats: 406
Default

yeah i know the debate goes on. i've had RC car solder joints fail before. not quite life threatening but still. the deal with the butt connectors is that there's a little strain relieving since the crimp is further inside the tube and the transition is gentler. plus the shrink tubing version offers some semi-flexibility between the crimp and wire.
y8s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 01:35 PM   #13
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Charleston, S.C.
Posts: 159
Total Cats: 0
Default

The other point is in a solder joint you have solder wick back up the wire and the wire becomes stiff. In the crimp connector the wire has some give to it to survive any flex. But this is an issue that will never be resolved.
04 Miata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 01:48 PM   #14
Elite Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (7)
 
samnavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Posts: 6,020
Total Cats: 175
Default

Thanks for the kudos. I'll be more than happy to ad any more hints/advice/technique in the main body of the writeup, but you'd better let me hear them before my 24hr edit timelimit is over.
samnavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 02:08 PM   #15
Elite Member
iTrader: (21)
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 5,684
Total Cats: 555
Default

SpamNavy, very nice pics. Very helpful to the uninitiated.

One thing. You said "My experienced recommendation is to just solder some wire-ends onto each wire and and connect them directly to the harness, leave the damn ignitor out of the loop."

Why? if you're gonna do that, why not a whole new connector from radio shack? Is the soldering inside the ignitor that fussy?
rleete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 02:41 PM   #16
Elite Member
iTrader: (13)
 
cjernigan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 8,147
Total Cats: 6
Default

If you have things you want to add/change just post them in an extra post and say where you want them. I'll fix it for you if it's over the 24hr limit or w/e it is.
cjernigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 03:00 PM   #17
Elite Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (7)
 
samnavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Posts: 6,020
Total Cats: 175
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rleete View Post
One thing. You said "My experienced recommendation is to just solder some wire-ends onto each wire and and connect them directly to the harness, leave the damn ignitor out of the loop."
Why? if you're gonna do that, why not a whole new connector from radio shack? Is the soldering inside the ignitor that fussy?
Soldering inside the ignitor was a nightmare. I've got a great small/accurate tip for my soldering iron and it took me about an hour to solder up 5 connections. Using the gutted ignitor as just a method for making use of what's there... but it doesn't buy you anything except retaining a factory look... and actually is one more junction that the signals have to pass through.

Here's what I'm talking about. Just connect the 6/5 wires on the end of the COP harness directly to the leads of the ECU harness... forget the ignitor.
samnavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 03:37 PM   #18
Elite Member
iTrader: (21)
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 5,684
Total Cats: 555
Default

Okay, but if you're going to do that, why not just cut out that connector entirely, and splice the wires? Each wire could be individually shrink wrapped, and then taped or shrink wrap over the bundle. As long as you're soldering on the car, rather than at a bench, why keep it stock at all? Is there something else that goes through that connection that you need to keep?
rleete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 04:46 PM   #19
Elite Member
Thread Starter
iTrader: (7)
 
samnavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: VIRGINIA BEACH, VA
Posts: 6,020
Total Cats: 175
Default

Because then you've made the COPs a permanent installation.
Right now, it'd take me about 10 minutes to convert back to standard ignition. If you cut the factory harness to the ignitor, then you'd have to cut/splice/solder all 9 wires back together again to return to stock... makes no sense.
samnavy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 07:28 PM   #20
Junior Member
iTrader: (2)
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: N/A
Posts: 360
Total Cats: 0
Default

Nice writeup I just made the mounting plate a few days ago for mine...




And now im waiting on the toyota dealership for the connectors.
mikeflys1 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
91 1.6l turbo complete part out. Tony the Tiger Miata parts for sale/trade 63 12-29-2016 03:23 AM
Toyota COP Erat Miata parts for sale/trade 17 02-17-2016 05:22 PM
01-05 Fab9 PNP COPs (used) FrankB Miata parts for sale/trade 6 09-30-2015 12:48 PM
Sold fail wagon Miata parts for sale/trade 2 09-07-2015 09:51 PM


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:22 PM.