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Old 06-16-2009, 12:37 AM   #1
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Default Whos got a motorcycle here?

So whos got one?
What kind do you have?
How long have you been riding, history behind it?
One piece of wisdom you would like to pass on to a new rider?


Gonna be picking up a bike soon and want to get a convo going about anything specific I should be aware of aside from the common stuff like getting proper attire.

Also im looking for a forum for motorcycle discussion that's not sportbikes.net.
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Old 06-16-2009, 12:56 AM   #2
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2000 cbr 929. riding for 9 years.
advice: don't try something you're not comfortable with, even if you're a fast learner it takes time. Don't ride with people you don't trust.

never really interested in a forum for bikes for some reason
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:27 AM   #3
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1985 Suzuki GS700ES, some custom work.
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Riding/working on it for 6ish years.

TAKE A BEGINNERS RIDING COURSE!!!
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:37 AM   #4
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The only mistake I ever made with motorcycles was buying my first one new. Your first bike should be practically disposable. Get something about 10yrs old that's been maintained well in the $2k-$3k range... nothing fancy and no big motors... just a plain easy something that you can learn, and that you won't be afraid of.

I just found your new bike.
2000 sv650 original owner
or
'00 Suzuki SV650

You'll love a twin for your first one. The Suzuki SV's are wonderful machines. I rode an SV1000 once and I almost sold my Aprilia to get one. The 650 is predictable and balanced. The bike magazines creamed themselves for months when these things came out and they have a huge following.

When you're done with this bike, sell it for what you paid and move on. I promise you'll have no regrets.
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:38 AM   #5
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my 1984 vf500c

Start with a cheap bike that you wont cry if you drop it in the driveway cause you forgot to put the kick stand down and walked away. Ask me how i know about this
Do not skimp on tires
Do not ride where you dont feel comfortable
Keep that **** sober remember even my old *** bike can take me 0-100 in 11 secs and the newer ones even more.
You might not die but the **** will hurt like a mother ******. Oh and if you dont wear a helmet wich is a choice but god damn it isn't that much of a hardship atleast wear some good glasses to keep **** out of your eyes. 90 mph or even 50 mph fly into the eye is like getting shot with a sling shot in the eye. Ohh ive been riding for about 8 yrs now. In rain and shine but nvr snow.
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:41 AM   #6
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I couldn't make up my mind so I tried a bunch. The 06 600rr and aprilia rsv1000r have been sold and the 07 600rr is still around. Riding for 8 months. My advice: find a bike you're comfortable with and stick with it for a while. Don't rush into new bikes like I did.





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Old 06-16-2009, 01:44 AM   #7
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If you're not the kind of guy that needs the biggest, fastest, most powerful bike (and you'll know if you are), you might end up sticking with the sv650 "forever" if you're into naked sports bikes. So if you truly want a starter bike in that category, I'd try a 80's or 90's ninja 250 or 500, they're still great fun for only about $1000. You'll grow tired of either one pretty quick though, they're slow. But like magna said, plan on dropping it once or twice. Some guy's don't, but generally they have a little dirt bike experience or something similar. What kind of bike are you looking at?
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:48 AM   #8
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Sold my last bike when I left CA, but have been riding for about 10 years on and off.

A big question is: what are your tastes? Are you a Cruiser guy, a Sportbike fan, or looking for a nice best-of-both-worlds Standard?

My first bike was a Honda CB250 Nighthawk. While not great on the freeway, it was excellent for around-town use, and cruised comfortably at 65. The nice thing about these bikes is that they're cheap to buy, cheap to maintain, cheap to repair, and no self-respecting thief would ever steal one. It also happens to be the standard bike used at pretty much every MSF training course on the planet, so when you take the course, you'll be riding the same bike you own. At 6'1" and about 190lb at the time I fit pretty well on it, which is rare for a 250. It's also pretty lightweight, so it's easy to pick up after you drop it. And you will drop it.


My most recent ride was a Suzuki SV650. This was just an awesome bike. Relatively affordable, very comfortable, powerful enough to cruise at 80 without feeling the least bit taxed, and enough torque to have fun pulling away from lights without accidentally popping wheelies in 6th. It's a little bigger and heavier than I'd recommend for a total novice, but certainly better than a crotch rocket with clipons and high pegs (I'm talking layout here, not merely engine size). On the plus side, you won't quickly outgrow it. A used one, like SamNavy has pointed out, would be a good starter so long as you're not a total asshat with the controls. The front brake on that machine will stop you faster than crashing into a brick wall if you're too grabby with it, and it is possible to wheelie it if you're not reasonable with the throttle in first. I don't want to scare you away, just point out that if you're the kind of guy who tries to find the limit right out of the box, you might want to start smaller.


One thing to remember- those superbikes like the GSXR and the ZX14 are a bit like Lamborghinis. They're scary fast in a straight line, but not really great for turning.


Unfortunately, a lot of shops won't let you test-ride a bike, especially if you're a newb. At least spend some time sitting on 'em. Have the salesperson hold the bike straight, put your feet on the pegs, work the shifter, work the clutch and front brake. Wear your boots and helmet while you're doing this. Get a feel for how easy the controls are to operate. Notice how the visibility is with your lid on- mirrors, instruments, etc. Make sure that while in the riding position you can turn your helmeted head fully sideways in both directions.


Apart from that, all the gear all the time. Jacket, overpants, leather boots, leather gloves, full-face helmet. I don't care if you're just going three blocks to the grocery store- you suit up before you get on. I've been down twice. The first time was a few months after I bought my first bike and started feeling confident. The second was about two years ago, at ~65 MPH. I've still got all my original skin.

Last edited by Joe Perez; 06-16-2009 at 01:58 AM.
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Old 06-16-2009, 03:12 AM   #9
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Had a CBR 600 F4 for almost a year. First bike, bought it when I was 18 with my parents disapproval, everyone said I was going to kill myself on a 600, obviously never did. Never dropped it or put it down. Didn't really have any dirt biking experience either, just riding friends dirt bikes once or twice.

Never had anything other than my skate shoes, leather jacket, and shorts.

Advice: Take it easy, and keep it in your head that any mistake you make could end your life. Don't ride twisties with others until you have gotten some experience. Even if you think you are ok to ride with them, you will likely end up going faster than you are capable of.
Oh, and try to avoid evading officers. :-)

Advice 2: Ride like you are invisible. Cars don't see you. That's the most dangerous part.
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Old 06-16-2009, 04:47 AM   #10
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1994 Ninja 600E2 98RWHP. Yosh full system, Stage 3 jet kit, -1+2 520 Sprockets.

Quit while you're ahead.
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Old 06-16-2009, 09:31 AM   #11
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So whos got one? Not me anymore, screw being married.

What kind do you have? (Had) Triumph Daytona 955i

How long have you been riding, history behind it? Been riding for 10 yrs, stepped up to this bike from a progression of smaller displacement bikes. 400cc, 500cc, 650cc >>>etc. This was the most amazing bike I've ever owned. Not a race replica, but a gentelman's sportbike. Litrebike power, sport tourer comfort and composure, supersport handling and braking.

One piece of wisdom you would like to pass on to a new rider?
Definitely take the safety course. Even seasoned riders will pick things up/break bad habits. It's best to start out the right way.

Start on a good beginner bike. This will allow you to grow your skills without creating the poor riding habits an overly aggressive bike tends to create in a new rider. This WILL NOT be the bike you own for the rest of your life, so don't worry about it. Get a cheap beater Ninja 250 that you can sell again next season for almost as much as you paid. The average rider swaps bikes every two years, and you'll always be stepping up and trying something else until you find THAT bike. It will also be hard for you to really know what you want in a bike without having ridden for a while. Save your money (and experience) for round two. Everyone I know that has done this is not only still alive, but very happy with their riding experience. Most folks that jump straight onto a supersport have very short riding careers for one reason or another.


EDIT: Sam beat me to the good cheap beginner bike part. He mentioned a Ninja 500 as well. These are excellent bikes, and easy to work on. I rode one for two years, and it was honestly one of my favorites due to decent power and comfort, cheap parts, and a great forum (ex-500.com). I never worried about it since it was cheap and undesireable. It wouldn't smoke other bikes (or even a GTO) but was faster than 98% of the cars on the road, which means you can still get out of your own (and their) way. This also means you won't tire of it so quickly. I didn't step up from that bike until I knew every edge of it's envelope, and that my riding skills were finally ready to surpass them. This is what starting small and stepping up is about. Don't every let a bike get ahead of your skill set. Stay in control: of yourself, your bike, and your situation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Saml01 View Post

Gonna be picking up a bike soon and want to get a convo going about anything specific I should be aware of aside from the common stuff like getting proper attire.

Also im looking for a forum for motorcycle discussion that's not sportbikes.net.

I really like sporttouring.net as well. I started over there when I got into bike forums a few years ago since my rides to school are 100miles each way and fit into the sport-touring category. They helped me find my last two bikes, both of which I enjoyed thoroughly.

Last edited by gospeed81; 06-16-2009 at 10:35 AM.
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Old 06-16-2009, 11:55 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curly View Post

TAKE A BEGINNERS RIDING COURSE!!!
Scheduled for July 8th.

Quote:
Originally Posted by samnavy View Post
You'll love a twin for your first one. The Suzuki SV's are wonderful machines. I rode an SV1000 once and I almost sold my Aprilia to get one. The 650 is predictable and balanced. The bike magazines creamed themselves for months when these things came out and they have a huge following.

When you're done with this bike, sell it for what you paid and move on. I promise you'll have no regrets.

I was leaning toward a GS500, but the more reading I do the more I am convinced that the SV650 is the way to go.

Quote:
Originally Posted by curly View Post
If you're not the kind of guy that needs the biggest, fastest, most powerful bike (and you'll know if you are), you might end up sticking with the sv650 "forever" if you're into naked sports bikes. So if you truly want a starter bike in that category, I'd try a 80's or 90's ninja 250 or 500, they're still great fun for only about $1000. You'll grow tired of either one pretty quick though, they're slow. But like magna said, plan on dropping it once or twice. Some guy's don't, but generally they have a little dirt bike experience or something similar. What kind of bike are you looking at?
Nah. Im def not the guy that needs the biggest, and the fastest. Its not that I dont trust myself, its just that I dont see the point. Even the middle tier bikes are already stupid fast, how much more do you need. I hear that the more powerful bikes are also less forgiving if you make a mistake. Totally love naked bikes, so I think the SV650 is gonna fit. I will def start with a used one, and once I gain proficiency pick up a new one.

In the end, I really want to build a cafe racer. Theres something about that vintage euro look that calls to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by magnamx-5 View Post
You might not die but the **** will hurt like a mother ******. Oh and if you dont wear a helmet wich is a choice but god damn it isn't that much of a hardship atleast wear some good glasses to keep **** out of your eyes. 90 mph or even 50 mph fly into the eye is like getting shot with a sling shot in the eye. Ohh ive been riding for about 8 yrs now. In rain and shine but nvr snow.
At the very least I am going to pickup a jacket, helmet, gloves, and boots. I have seen enough **** online that shows its not so much as the impact that kills you, its the lack of skin covering your internal organs after you grind to a stop with nothing between you and the ground but your hide.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Perez View Post

A big question is: what are your tastes? Are you a Cruiser guy, a Sportbike fan, or looking for a nice best-of-both-worlds Standard?

Apart from that, all the gear all the time. Jacket, overpants, leather boots, leather gloves, full-face helmet. I don't care if you're just going three blocks to the grocery store- you suit up before you get on. I've been down twice. The first time was a few months after I bought my first bike and started feeling confident. The second was about two years ago, at ~65 MPH. I've still got all my original skin.
I'm a cruiser guy but I dont want a Harley. I also don't like the laying down seating position of the super sports. So I think a best of both worlds would be ideal.

I agree with the dress. Its one thing I always intend to do. Its dangerous enough to ride the thing in the first place, but it would be stupid to not protect yourself at least some how.

Last edited by Saml01; 06-16-2009 at 12:11 PM.
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Old 06-16-2009, 12:37 PM   #13
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So whos got one? Used to have a Yamaha YZF-600R with my brother.

What kind do you have? Now he has a R6 that I ride occasionally and keep trying to buy from him. Currently looking for a FZ6 or cheap-ish R6. Would get a BMW if they'd ever come down in price. Would love to have a Duc looking pretty in the garage.

How long have you been riding, history behind it? Been riding since 2003.

One piece of wisdom you would like to pass on to a new rider?
Education: Take a newb Safety Class and then the Advanced one a few months after you start riding (I still need to take the advanced as well).

Gear: 100% gear 100% of the time. The bare minimum for myself is helmet, gloves, pants, closed toe shoes, and jacket at the very least. For the twisties or longer trips it's boots and sometimes leather pants. No flip flops and no shorts.

Don't get a flip up or open faced helmet.

Look on Ebay for really good gear deals, especially used Leathers. Helmets from an online source or special ordered from a local place are better if you buy new. This is because they will usually have a new date of manufacture and helmet material degrades with time.

If you sit your helmet on the bike it will eventually fall off. Dropped helmets make baby kittens cry.

Towing: Make sure you have AAA or towing on your insurance. Even a minor drop can sometimes break stuff and being stranded sucks.

Tires: Get the stickiest tires you can, even if they only last maybe 6K miles. I've always liked the Metzlers but you're probably fine with any of the major brands.

Theft: Disc locks are good and fit under most seats. Lock the bike up even if you keep it in a garage.

Riding: Stay in your own comfort zone when following someone through the twisties.

My

Chris
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Old 06-16-2009, 12:59 PM   #14
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2002 Kawasaki ZX-9R (orange)
Been riding for 15 years now.
*always* wear a full face helmet, gloves, leather jacket, long pants, closed toe shoes.

Miatamaniac92 pretty much summed everything up. Excellent post!
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:27 PM   #15
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I have been riding for 13 years. I have had many motorcycles. My first bike was a 1992 Katana 600. Great beginer bike, had lots of room for improvement. But as a starter bike for todays times, I would recomend the SV650. I had one as a commuter bike, and again like all Suzukis it was a great bike. Fun in the corners, and still decent amount of power. Plus there is lots of after market goods avaible for it. I know at least 4 people that bought SV650s as there first bike, and still own them after moving on to bigger and faster.
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:29 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saml01 View Post
I hear that the more powerful bikes are also less forgiving if you make a mistake.
Not sure exactly what you mean... I guess it depends on the mistake. The most common riding error that a new guy makes is entering a corner too fast and making a combination of mistakes that results in driving wide off the road... typically involves poor corner entry, head position (looking in the wrong place), too much rear brake, and a few others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saml01 View Post
its not so much as the impact that kills you, its the lack of skin covering your internal organs after you grind to a stop with nothing between you and the ground but your hide.
From being an EMT for 4 years and 8 years of riding experience, I can tell you it's completey the opposite. Abrasion injuries are usually shoulders, butt, calves, thighs, head, back, arms, and ankles. During an accident, the body is natually going to curl up if able to protect the internal organs. I've never seen somebody's abdomen scraped open. On the other hand, a 20mph impact into a solid object (even fully geared up) is enough to kill you from internal injuries. It IS the impact that kills you.
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:52 PM   #17
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SV650 is the only choice for a starter bike.

I'm riding a Suzuki DRZ400-SM these days. I just got rid of a Triumph 955i. Before that I had an SV1000 and half a dozen other odds and ends before that. My favorite was probably the SV, but my old KZ400s was a close second.

As far as advice, buy the best gear you can afford. If you can't afford a $400+ jacket and $400+ helmet you can't afford to ride. I ride Dainese, Alpinestars, Shoei, Arai, Sidi... And that's pretty much it. You WILL fall off the bike at some point, and you WILL be a giant scab if you're wearing junk. I'm far from rich, but I saved my nickels until I could afford to buy nice enough stuff that I feel safe in it.

Also, never, ever ride with someone you don't trust, and never ride over your head. If the guys you ride with a fast enough that you're afraid of losing them, find slower guys to ride with. If they make fun of you for being slow, find new guys to ride with. You should never feel uncomfortable with the guys you ride with or the bike.

Ride like no one around you sees you and all of them want to squish you. Trust no cager. Making eye contact does not mean they actually saw you or that they won't come over on you anyway. I like to keep a couple of semi truck lug nuts in the pocket of my jacket for instances like this.

And lastly, beware the confidence. Almost every incident or close call I can think of having was my own fault for either not paying attention to what was going on around me, or being overly confident in my capabilities.



P.S. If you're not having a good time, you need to reevaluate your situation. Riding is about entertainment, not transportation. If you're not grinning in your lid every time you crack the throttle, you're doing something wrong
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:53 PM   #18
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naked bikes rock man
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:58 PM   #19
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naked bikes rock man
Supermoto's are all the cool things about a naked bike, plus the ability to go ANYWHERE. I have pics of my DRZ on top of the courthouse steps And they're indestructible, imminently flickable and slow enough that you can absolutely abuse the thing on the street and not go to Federal Pound Me In The *** Prison.

They just don't do interstate very well, lol.
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Old 06-16-2009, 01:58 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samnavy View Post

From being an EMT for 4 years and 8 years of riding experience, I can tell you it's completey the opposite. Abrasion injuries are usually shoulders, butt, calves, thighs, head, back, arms, and ankles. During an accident, the body is natually going to curl up if able to protect the internal organs. I've never seen somebody's abdomen scraped open. On the other hand, a 20mph impact into a solid object (even fully geared up) is enough to kill you from internal injuries. It IS the impact that kills you.


Again Sam beat me too it.

I read "sliding worse than impacts" and was slapped in the face with a big WTF?. Impacts will always do much more damage to your internals than the skin you lose to asphalt. This doesn't mean you shouldn't wear good (leather) gear, but that you should be seriously worried about what you can run into, and what will run over you.

This is why riding on a racetrack is actually safer. You may have more accidents, but they won't be as severe(disregarding highsides). On a track there is purposely very few hard objects to slide into, and there are no cars and 18wheelers to flatten you. With good gear you can slide all day and just walk away bruised.



On big bikes being less forgiving you are correct, but I think the only regards to displacement are improper throttle input. I have seen guys on bikes too big for their britches roll on too much throttle exiting a turn and have the back tire come out. In traffic this can happen by hitting bumps as most newbs don't keep their wrists in the right spot to dampen road imperfection's effects on controls.

Smaller bikes do tend to be a little easier to recover from skids and such.
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