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Old 02-18-2012, 08:56 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by vintagerust View Post
I thought it was used to make it easier to assemble at the plant.
This is the only plausible theory I've heard on it. The rest of the theories have a serious flaw in them - why didn't Mazda do it with the RX7 clutch too then, as it uses almost identical clutch components to the Miata and would suffer from substantially worse heating/air/etc. then the Miata.
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Old 02-18-2012, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by thegrapist View Post
http://www.ipdusa.com/newsletters/90...er-check-valve

If you can't read that poorly formatted garbage:
"Braided Steel Brake Lines. Myth and Reality
There’s a lot said about rubber lines “swelling” and causing a soft pedal. While this can happen in older cars, it’s not the primary gain from upgraded brake lines. Yes, the Teflon tube wrapped with braided steel has a much lower swell than rubber and textile lines. The firmer pedal that is so immediately apparent is mostly from the smaller inside diameter of the Teflon lines. Since the Teflon is more rigid, you can get away with a smaller diameter without increasing the risk of collapse. This means that you actually need to move less brake fluid to achieve the same application of brakes. The result? A more responsive pedal with greater feedback."

I'm no engineer so I can't verify that, but that seems entirely more likely. Especially since rubber hoses are decently stiff. But I'd rather have an engineer step in and drop some knowledge on us.
That is a giant pile of dumb, you're not filling the brake lines when you push the pedal, they are already filled. Since brake fluid is incompressible (or incompressible enough for it not to matter at these pressures), the amount of brake fluid that is being compressed is irrelevant. The pedal feel improvement is from the rubber not being able to expand, which changes the volume of the lines and would be noticed in the brake pedal.

Running the 949 clutch line, got it while ordering some other stuff purely to get rid of the curly-q.
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Old 02-18-2012, 10:52 AM
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I thought the curly-q was so the hard line could flex without breaking, like how a lot of cars have similar curls for brake hardlines.
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Old 02-18-2012, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by skidude View Post
I thought the curly-q was so the hard line could flex without breaking, like how a lot of cars have similar curls for brake hardlines.
After reading several threads over on m.net (lack of logical thought, anyone?), I agree that this is the most probable explanation. Slave is mounted to the tranny, and rotates about the centerline of the engine (approximately) when the engine is revved. So, to prevent a stress crack, the curl is put in to absorb the flex/displacement.
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:01 PM
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/\ so far that is the most logical thing I've heard about it too.
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by skidude View Post
I thought the curly-q was so the hard line could flex without breaking, like how a lot of cars have similar curls for brake hardlines.
Oh.

I thought the curly cue was there so when you pull the motor and trans without disconnecting the slave, there's some slack in the line to travel a ways before you notice it.
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Old 02-18-2012, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by vintagerust View Post
I thought it was used to make it easier to assemble at the plant.
Originally Posted by skidude View Post
I thought the curly-q was so the hard line could flex without breaking, like how a lot of cars have similar curls for brake hardlines.
The explanation that I had heard was a combination of these two. Basically, something needed to be added to absorb the twisting and flexing. A rubber flex hose would be fine on its own, but it would have been harder to assemble at the factory, so the curly bit was added to change the position where the flex line had to be attached, in order to make assembly quicker and easier along the assembly line.
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