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Old 05-22-2015, 12:13 PM   #4821
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizen calling police for help.</p><p>Man Calls Cops About Teenage Party, They Show up And Shoot Him | TruthVoice</p><p>
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</p><p>San Antonio police shot at a man and arrested him in his bathrobe after he called security about a wild teen party in his upscale neighborhood, the man claims in court</p><p>Plaintiff Peter T. Conner is a national security consultant, a Department of Defense contractor and a licensed private investigator, he says in his May 13 complaint.</p><p>He sued San Antonio, three of its police officers, the Dominion Homeowners Association and G4S Secure Solutions in Bexar County Court.</p><p>In the early morning of Father&rsquo;s Day 2013, after complaining to G4S about a wild party two houses away, Conner says, he was awakened by lights moving in his backyard.</p><p>&ldquo;Believing the intruders to be errant guests from the party, plaintiff donned a bathrobe, went to his garage, turned on the outside floodlight and the lights inside the garage, and opened the three garage doors. Plaintiff then yelled at the intruders to get off of his property,&rdquo; Conner says in the complaint.</p><p>&ldquo;The next thing plaintiff knew, shots were being fired at him from the intruders. Plaintiff immediately ducked for cover, and the shots hit his vehicle parked just outside the garage. Fearing for his life, plaintiff retreated quickly back inside and closed the garage doors.&rdquo;</p><p>Next thing he saw was flashing lights in his front yard and voices announcing themselves as San Antonio police, to which Conner says he responded, &ldquo;You better be!&rdquo;</p><p>He says that the police presence &ldquo;was a surprise to plaintiff since he still believed unknown intruders had fired shots at him.&rdquo;</p><p><span style="color:rgb(0, 0, 0)">Before plaintiff could speak further, defendant [Officers Ernesto] Juarez and [Cody] Davis handcuffed him and placed him in a squad car, where he sat for well over an hour, still in his robe,&rdquo; Conner says in the 11-page complaint.</span></p><p><span style="color:rgb(0, 0, 0)">...</span></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Nonetheless, police charged him with aggravated assault on a peace officer and tossed him into the Bexar County Adult Detention Center, where he spent most of Father&rsquo;s Day, Conner says.</p><p>A grand jury refused to indict him, &ldquo;but the damage to plaintiff&rsquo;s name and reputation had already been done,&rdquo; according to the complaint.</p><p>Conner says police spread a false story about the June 16, 2013 incident, claiming that he had &ldquo;crashed a truck through the front gate to his subdivision and had fired upon police officers, which was absolutely false.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Given plaintiff&rsquo;s work in national security, these false stories were extremely damaging to his reputation and have caused him tremendous embarrassment,&rdquo; the complaint states. &ldquo;When one Googles plaintiff&rsquo;s name, the first page of results displays a number of stories indicating that plaintiff fired upon police officers.&rdquo;</p><p>According to the San Antonio Express-News, police reported that Conner &ldquo;exited the garage in a shooting posture with what (the officers) perceived to be a handgun.&rdquo; The report says that officers fired three rounds at the suspect, who &ldquo;then retreated back in to the garage.&rdquo;<br />A spokesperson for the City of San Antonio deferred comment to the San Antonio Police Department, which did not respond to a request for comment.</p><p>Conner says he also serves as senior adviser for the Center for Terrorism Law at St. Mary&rsquo;s University School of Law and had &ldquo;never been in trouble with the law or been arrested prior to the event giving rise to this suit.&rdquo;</p><p>He seeks punitive damages for civil rights violations, assault, malicious prosecution and unlawful arrest.</p><p>
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:19 PM   #4822
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens who keeping reading this same story.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Corrections official: Arkansas officers fatally shoot handcuffed man inside patrol car | Fox News</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>
Quote:
</p><p>CABOT, Ark. &ndash; &nbsp;Authorities say Arkansas officers fatally shot a handcuffed parolee who fired at them from inside a patrol car.</p><p>State Department of Community Correction Deputy Director Dina Tyler says 35-year-old Jonathan McIntosh was killed Tuesday in Cabot, 25 miles northwest of Little Rock.</p><p>Tyler says ADCC and Lonoke County Sheriff's Department officers detained McIntosh while searching for another suspect.</p><p>She says officers found suspected drugs on McIntosh, cuffed his hands behind him and put him in the back of the vehicle. She says McIntosh opened fire when officers returned to interview him.</p><p>Tyler says two ADCC officers and one sheriff's department employee shot at McIntosh, who died at a hospital.</p><p>She says he somehow got his cuffed hands in front of him and it's unclear where he got the gun.</p><p>No officers were injured.</p><p id="399">
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:21 PM   #4823
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<p>the problem with polcing is the citizen blocking the sidewalk</p><p>
</p><p>skip to 3:00</p><p>
Quote:
</p><p>As I was video taping a police officer he pinned me up against a wall for videotaping him in public. He tried to say that I was blocking the sidewalk from ambulance or fire trucks to get by. Though really that was all an excuse for him to get me to stop video taping him. Also, listen to what the officer says about&nbsp;</p><p id="242">
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:25 PM   #4824
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens who put them at &quot;blue alert&quot;</p><p>Obama Signed Bill to Help Protect Police From Threats, However, Police Are Not Under Attack in America | Firedoglake</p><p>
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</p><p>President Barack Obama signed legislation that creates a &ldquo;Blue Alert&rdquo; system for law enforcement in the United States. It establishes a network for alerting police expeditiously when there are &ldquo;active threats&rdquo; against police. However, police are not under attack and have not been under attack in the US, despite recent tragic deaths of officers.</p><p>The passage of this legislation is the product of the continued exploitation of the deaths of Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu, who were killed by a mentally ill black man, Ismaaiyl Brinsley, on December 20. It provided a sensational example of an ambush killing that local and national police associations could seize upon to undercut the &ldquo;Black Lives Matter&rdquo; movement, which has been drawing attention to police violence directed at black Americans.</p><p>It also is one of the first&nbsp;recommended&nbsp;&ldquo;action items&rdquo; by Obama&rsquo;s appointed police &ldquo;task force&rdquo; to be implemented. In contrast to many of the policy suggestions, this does nothing to reform police but rather reinforces the false presumption that police face some kind of threat because of increased opposition to police conduct.</p><p>&ldquo;Leveraging the current Amber Alert program used to locate abducted children, the Blue Alert would enlist the help of the public in finding suspects after a law enforcement officer is killed in the line of duty,&rdquo; the report recently released by the &ldquo;task force&rdquo; indicates. &ldquo;Some similar state systems do exist, but there are large gaps, a national system is needed. In addition to aiding the apprehension of suspects, it would send a message about the importance of protecting law enforcement from undue harm.&rdquo;</p><p>Except, there is no debate in the United States. Just about all citizens agree that law enforcement should not face &ldquo;undue harm.&rdquo; Far fewer, unfortunately, agree that strong measures should be taken to protect people of color from &ldquo;undue harm&rdquo; from law enforcement.</p><p>The&nbsp;bipartisan legislation, named after Ramos and Liu, establishes that a system will send out alerts when an officer is seriously injured or killed. The system will send out an alert when an officer is missing. &ldquo;At the time of receipt of death,&rdquo; the suspect should be &ldquo;wanted by a law enforcement agency.&rdquo; The suspect should not have already been apprehended. There should be &ldquo;sufficient descriptive information of the suspect involved and any relevant vehicle and tag numbers.&rdquo;</p><p>More problematic is the fact that an alert will go out when there is an &ldquo;imminent and credible threat&rdquo; that &ldquo;an individual intends to cause the serious injury or death of a law enforcement officer.&rdquo;</p><p>The criteria for sending out this type of &ldquo;blue alert&rdquo; includes &ldquo;confirmation&rdquo; that a threat is &ldquo;imminent and credible.&rdquo; How threats are to be confirmed is not outlined in the legislation.</p><p>Ashley Yates, co-founder of Millennial Activists United and an activist who was part of protests in the immediately after Mike Brown was killed by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson,&nbsp;declared, &ldquo;I am absolutely disheartened and honestly terrified,&rdquo; by the &ldquo;Blue Alert&rdquo; bill President Obama signed. Yates worries it could be used by police to suppress protest.</p><p>She&nbsp;fears&nbsp;that the system will &ldquo;encourage vigilantes and place possibly innocent &lsquo;suspects&rsquo; in serious danger&rdquo;&nbsp;because&nbsp;&ldquo;you only need to be suspected to get blasted out via this system. There is a grave potential for mistaken identity and false accusations.&rdquo; (Yates&nbsp;shared&nbsp;this harrowing story of 23-year-old Cornell McKay, who was falsely accused by St. Louis police of being involved in a robbery that ended in a murder. Authorities insisted he was responsible, even as it became evident there was evidence McKay was never involved in the robbery.)</p><p>The &ldquo;Amber Alert&rdquo; system is now capable of&nbsp;sending alerts&nbsp;to millions of cell phone users. It has a page on Facebook, which makes it possible for users to share alerts about missing children. Will the &ldquo;Blue Alert&rdquo; system harness technology in this same manner? And what information about suspects will be in any public alerts?</p><p>How will citizens be certain that this system will not be manipulated to undermine protests explicitly directed at police departments by hyping threats (as happened in Baltimore when police&nbsp;wrongly attributed&nbsp;violence to a flier urging teens to take part in a &ldquo;purge&rdquo.</p><p>What if someone sends an angry tweet that police construe as a &ldquo;threat&rdquo; against police? How might that be put into the &ldquo;Blue Alert&rdquo; system and what might the effect on freedom of expression be?</p><p>More significantly, as writer Ryan Dalton&nbsp;stated, &ldquo;Police are not being systematically targeted and murdered in America. Black people are.&rdquo;</p><p>No statistics come close to supporting the notion that police are under attack and in need of urgent protection.</p><p>...</p><p id="261">
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:30 PM   #4825
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens.</p><p>WATCH: Jersey City cop 'highly intoxicated' in traffic stop, but not charged; why not? | NJ.com</p><p>
Quote:
</p><p><strong>A Jersey City police sergeant was accused of driving &quot;highly intoxicated&quot; in Robbinsville in January 2014, but was released without charges into the custody of Jersey City police and remains on the job.</strong></p><p>The incident is documented in a dramatic video and multiple police reports obtained via a public-records request. The video, taken from the dashboard of one a Robbinsville police officer, shows one officer telling Sgt. Vincent Corso, the Jersey City cop, that he is too &quot;f***** up&quot; to drive, while just off camera there is an apparent struggle after the officers tell&nbsp;Corso they plan to&nbsp;confiscate his gun.</p><p>News of the traffic stop first surfaced two weeks ago when Robert Cowan, the former Jersey City police chief,&nbsp;cited the incident in a civil lawsuit he filed&nbsp;against the city, Mayor Steve Fulop and Public Safety Director James Shea.</p><p>Cowan alleges in his lawsuit that he ordered an internal affairs investigation into Corso's traffic stop over the objections of Fulop and Shea. The ex-police chief, whose allegations have been dubbed fiction by city spokeswoman Jennifer Morrill, says Fulop tried to conceal the incident involving Corso, a local union official, because he wanted to curry favor with the union in advance of&nbsp;a possible gubernatorial run in 2017.</p><p>Corso, 47, the first vice president of the Jersey City Police Superior Officers Association and a 22-year veteran of the police force, did not return a phone call seeking comment.</p><p>Hudson County Prosecutor's Office spokesman Gene Rubino said his office did not investigate the matter, while Mercer County's prosecutor opted not to bring charges against the Robbinsville cops.</p><p>Jersey City public-safety spokeswoman Carly Baldwin said she couldn't respond to questions about Corso because the traffic stop is &quot;tied to ongoing litigation.&quot; Baldwin confirmed that Corso remains an active police officer in Jersey City.</p><p>...</p><p id="184">
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:34 PM   #4826
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens obstructing an investigation.</p><p>
</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>
Quote:
</p><p id="eow-description">We started filming after the Police smashed through my front door and left. We went outside on our own property to film and ascertain what was going on, on our property.<br /><br />Aside from having no warrant. The police make a grab for my phone as I am attacked. My poor wife is then attacked by male officers and sexually assaulted. We were locked up and charged with aggravated assault on an officer and resisting arrest.<br /><br />After obtaining audio of the phony indictment, we discovered the big beefy officer committed perjury to the Grand Jury.<br /><br />After investigation of Public Record:<br /><br /><br />Through proper investigation, public officials to include Judges, Prosecutors, and Public Defenders, Officers of the Court have failed to have oaths of office in accordance with:<br /><br />N.J.S.A. 40 A: 5-33 &quot;In addition to any oath that may be specially prescribed, every person elected or appointed to any office in any local unit shall, before assuming such office, take and subscribe to the oaths required by chapter 1 of the Title &quot;Oaths and Affidavits&quot; (R.S. 41:1-1 et seq.). The oaths shall be filed with the county clerk in the case of the county, and the municipal clerk in the case of a municipality, and shall be preserved by these officials as public records.&quot;<br /><br />County Prosecutors are violating N.J.S.A. 2B:25-6 and N.J.S.A. 40 A: 5-33, since they are part of the collusion and hence protecting violators of the law. I am in the process of alerting the U.S. Attorney General and the State Attorney General due to County Prosecutors Misconduct by being derelict of their duties by not properly managing the lower courts with Prosecutors who fail to take oath of offices. Hence, 18 U.S.C. Section 2382 or law in this manner is clear cut.<br /><br />Whereas:<br /><br />1. The violators of law having no oaths of office, can not formally be charged with Official Misconduct since in case law only Official Misconduct can be charged upon those who truly hold an office. Case law is clear that having no oath of office deems the position/office vacant.<br /><br />2. The integrity of the internal affairs in Ocean County is compromised. The crucial component of an effective criminal system is non-existent if you are colored, culturally different, or poor. This is a loss of public confidence and a miscarriage of justice.<br /><br />3. You are Guilty of the crimes you have committed, without due process and automatically despite the charade of injustice is performed in the courts.</p><p id="298">
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Old 05-22-2015, 12:42 PM   #4827
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Originally Posted by Braineack View Post
???? you cant inject your own reality.



Pony Adam Savage disagrees. Your argument is invalid.
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Old 05-22-2015, 03:29 PM   #4828
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<p>The problem with policing is the citizens complaining about being pulled over by a tank.</p><p>ASO deputies disciplined following traffic stop by armored vehicle | Gainesville.com</p><p>
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</p><p>An Alachua County sheriff's sergeant was suspended for one day and a deputy was reprimanded after they used an armored vehicle to perform a traffic stop on a driver who they believed was in the middle of receiving a sex act when he made a rude hand gesture toward them.</p><p>The ASO command staff also ordered the sergeant to update an agency policy restricting use of the Bearcat, a beefy, camouflaged rig coated with a bulletproof skin, according to an internal affairs report released Friday morning.</p><p>The report concluded the deputies needed to grow a thicker skin.</p><p>On April 11, deputies used the Lenco Bearcat Armored Personnel Carrier to pull over 24-year-old Lucas Jewell on West University Avenue in Gainesville. The punishment was not for the unusual use of the armored vehicle; the report found there was no policy governing that. It was for the misapplication of a traffic law.</p><p id="228">
</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>I hope the guy who just got pepper sprayed and arrested for flicking off a cop reads this.</p>
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Old 05-22-2015, 03:33 PM   #4829
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<p>The problem with policing is the citizens refusing a search.</p><p>Court Reminds Police That Refusing A Search Isn't Inherently Suspicious Behavior</p><p>
Quote:
</p><p>Deborah Barker was arrested for methamphetamine possession after an Oregon police officer performed a warrantless search of the contents of her purse. Her motion to suppress was denied by a lower court,&nbsp;but the state appeals court found otherwise.&nbsp;</p><p>...</p><p>Second, the condition of the vehicle's interior is also cited as &quot;reasonable suspicion&quot; -- namely that it had trash and lighters in it. Paradoxically, law enforcement almost simultaneously claims that the&nbsp;<em>absence</em>&nbsp;of drug paraphernalia/trash is inherently suspicious. Here it is arguing that a&nbsp;<em>clean</em>&nbsp;car is a drug trafficker's car in a&nbsp;Seventh Circuit Court decision&nbsp;from earlier this month:</p><p>
Quote:
<em>A ten-minute search turned up nothing, save for two cell phones. The interior of the car was &ldquo;spotless&rdquo; and had no other personal effects, which the officers believed was suggestive of the car being a &ldquo;trap car&rdquo; used for drug trafficking.</em>
</p><p>You can't win. But you can try to even the odds.</p><p>
Quote:
<em>Defendant was wearing a dress, and Ratliff did not believe she had any weapons in her pockets. Ratliff asked defendant if she had any weapons in her purse, and defendant replied, &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t want you to search my purse.&rdquo;</em>
</p><p>The officer asked her to place the purse on the hood of the vehicle for &quot;safety&quot; reasons. (Not completely unreasonable, considering Barker hadn't answered one way or the other on the question about whether the purse held a weapon.) It fell open a little, exposing a small, gray scale. This led to the assumption of the probable cause needed to effect an arrest of Barker, combined with Barker's appearance (&quot;leathery&quot and &quot;drug history.&quot;&nbsp;<br /><br />All well and good, but the officer then decided to search the purse without a warrant, ultimately discovering a small amount of meth hidden in a wallet. And that's where it ran into problems. First, Officer Ratliff made this assertion, which basically states that &quot;innocent&quot; people don't force cops to respect their rights.</p><p>
Quote:
<em>Ratliff went on to note that the &ldquo;innocent motoring public doesn&rsquo;t generally have those indicators. They don&rsquo;t get out of the vehicle and tuck their purse tightly with them and immediately refuse search.&rdquo;</em>
</p><p>The lower court bought Ratliff's arguments and refused to suppress the fruits of the warrantless search. The appeals court, however, looked at each element the state claimed added up to permission to warrantlessly search Barker's purse and found them all wanting -- those being Barker's history of drug use, the vehicle's appearance, Barker's appearance (&quot;leathery,&quot; clenched teeth), dilated pupils, in possession of a small scale and refusing to allow an officer to search her purse.</p><p>
Quote:
<em>As we have previously held, the mere fact that a defendant has a history of drug use does not provide an officer with reasonable suspicion to stop a defendant, let alone probable cause to search or arrest.</em>&nbsp;<br /><br /><em>[...]</em>&nbsp;<br /><br /><em>For similar reasons, defendant&rsquo;s inability to remain still and dilated pupils also contribute little to establishing probable cause.</em>&nbsp;<br /><br /><em>[...]</em>&nbsp;<br /><br /><em>[T]he record in this case lacks evidence to support an objectively reasonable inference that, even if the scale was used in connection with controlled substances, it was more likely than not that defendant was in current possession of controlled substances, as residue on the scale or otherwise.</em>
</p><p>Finally, it addresses the claim that Barker's control of her purse was yet another factor contributing to her apparent guilt.</p><p>
Quote:
<em>The state argues that &ldquo;[t]he strongest indicator that defendant was in possession of drugs was her conduct towards her purse.&rdquo;</em>
</p><p>But that's completely wrong, according to the court. It's not a &quot;strong indicator.&quot; It's an assertion of rights.</p><p>
Quote:
<em><strong>When an individual seeks to protect an item and openly asserts his or her privacy rights, that behavior and assertion is neither innately shifty nor sinister&mdash;rather, it is constitutionally protected</strong>. And, &ldquo;[a]llowing the police to conduct a search on the basis of the assertion of a privacy right would render the so-called right nugatory.&rdquo; State v. Brown, 110&hellip;</em>
Quote:
<em><strong>Although furtive behavior may contribute to probable cause, asserting a constitutionally protected privacy right cannot</strong>. Defendant&rsquo;s protective behavior to safeguard the privacy of her purse and her statement that she did not want it searched are not properly considered as part of the totality of the circumstances and may not contribute to probable cause.</em>
</p><p>In short (and as summed up in a footnote), police cannot use someone's constitutionally-protected right to refuse a search as probable cause to justify a search. The ruling is reversed and remanded and the police are now in the same position they were&nbsp;<em>before</em>&nbsp;they performed the warrantless search: looking at someone they want to arrest but without the probable cause to do so. And now it's so much worse because the officer&nbsp;<em>knows</em>&nbsp;Barker was in possession of a controlled substance but can't do anything about it. With the evidence suppressed, the single possession charge resulting from this arrest no longer exists.&nbsp;<br /><br />These rights weren't granted to citizens just so the government could use any exercise of them against those availing themselves of these protections. They were supposed to safeguard citizens against governmental overreach and abuse of its powers, but default mode seems to be that only the guilty assert their rights. This mindset is so perverse -- and so pervasive -- that it has to be beaten back one court decision at a time. Law enforcement officers treat assertions of rights as, at best, an annoyance and at worst, tacit admissions of guilt. To operate under such a twisted interpretation displays an almost incomprehensible level of privilege -- where government agents are&nbsp;<em>owed</em>&nbsp;whatever they request and any failure to cooperate is treated with suspicion.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p id="257">
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Old 05-22-2015, 05:42 PM   #4830
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Cops hate it when you don't put out.

Islamic State burned a woman alive for not engaging in an ?extreme? sex act, U.N. official says - The Washington Post
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Old 05-26-2015, 02:33 AM   #4831
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Cops hate it when you're having a stroke while they are trying to illegally arrest you.

WATCH: Virginia cop uses pepper-spray, Taser on unresisting black man having stroke

Best of all

"Following his arrest, Washington was taken to a nearby hospital and later released. He has been charged with reckless driving and driving on a revoked license, but has not been arrested."

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Old 05-26-2015, 08:37 AM   #4832
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<p>Oh look! This guy had an accident and is unresposive in the car. &nbsp;Let's yell at him, threaten to end his life, tase him, mace him, and run him over!</p><p>I'm glad this guy will win a settlement that will set him for life. &nbsp;I'm sad the officers the&nbsp;will stay on duty to &quot;smoke&quot; another citizen.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>here's another bodycam:</p><p>
</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>The officer resigned, but still claims he did nothing wrong.</p><p>Fredericksburg police release video of taser, pepper spray incident</p><p>
Quote:
</p><p>Newly released police body camera videos show a Fredericksburg police officer use his Taser and pepper spray on a motionless, silent driver who was having a medical emergency.</p><p>That officer, Shaun Jurgens, resigned from the city police department on May 14. But in a statement to the&nbsp;Fredericksburg Free Lance-Star, Jurgens says he did not violate any policies in the May 4 incident.</p><p>However the police department decided that Jurgens&rsquo; use of force was not in line with department policies or training.</p><p>The department is still reviewing whether the two other officers seen in the videos, Cpl. Matt Deschenes and Sgt. Crystal Hill, will face any departmental charges or reprimands stemming from the incident. They remain on duty, according to the department.</p><p>The three officers responded to calls for a hit-and-run and driver traveling in the wrong direction in the northbound lanes of Jefferson Davis Highway near the University of Mary Washington pedestrian bridge.</p><p>A Hyundai driven by 34-year-old David Washington hit a Jeep, crossed the median and hit a street sign. The Hyundai eventually stopped in the middle of an intersection.</p><p>In the newly released videos, Hill and Deschenes are the first two officers to arrive to the stopped Hyundai. They have their guns drawn and are heard screaming at the driver to put his hands up, sometimes using profanities.</p><p>As the two officers yell at Washington, his right arm appears to raise to the steering wheel, but his left arm appears motionless.</p><p>Hill yells to Deschenes that she cannot see the driver&rsquo;s left hand.</p><p>When Jurgens arrives, he initially approaches with his gun drawn, then circles behind a police cruiser where he draws his Taser.</p><p>When the Taser does not appear to fully connect with Washington, Jurgens pepper sprays Washington&rsquo;s face. When Washington doesn&rsquo;t get out of the car, Jurgens and Deschenes pull him out and onto the ground where they put him in handcuffs. Washington can be heard moaning, and saying &ldquo;I can&rsquo;t breathe.&rdquo;</p><p>Washington tells the officers that he has been sick for days, but that he does not know what is wrong.</p><p id="851">
</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>If you're ready for a laugh this morning:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fredericksburg.com/news/crime_courts/officer-gives-his-side-of-taser-incident/article_ae7185f0-ffe2-11e4-ab97-83371dd3f848.html"><strong>Fredericksburg police officer gives his side of Taser incident (with video)</strong></a></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><strong>and my favorite comment so far:</strong></p><p>
Quote:
</p><p><span style="color:rgb(34, 34, 34)">I don't know guys this is a tough call for me. It looks like this person was morphing into another more powerful form. For all the cop knows this person could have turned out to be the incredible hulk and destroyed the entire town. I say this is a pretty close call.</span></p><p id="3704">
</p>

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Old 05-26-2015, 08:40 AM   #4833
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens on the battelfied.</p><p>Cop used military ?rules of engagement? in 2012 Cleveland killing - World Socialist Web Site</p><p>
Quote:
</p><p>Michael Brelo, the Cleveland police officer acquitted by a judge Sunday of shooting two people at point-blank range while standing on the hood of their car, had previously told investigators that he reverted to his military training during the incident.</p><p>In an interview with police investigators after the shooting, Brelo told a police lieutenant that the November 2012 chase and shooting &ldquo;was like being back in a war,&rdquo; according to testimony at the trial.</p><p>An article in&nbsp;<em>Cleveland Magazine</em>&nbsp;recounted the questioning. Asked if he remembered jumping on the hood of the car, Brelo said, &ldquo;No, sir. It&rsquo;s possible, because I was so terrified that I was going to get ran over. But I don&rsquo;t recall that, sir.&rdquo; Asked if he feared for his safety and that of the other officers, Brelo said, &ldquo;The most I&rsquo;ve ever been in my life, sir, even with Iraq. I thought we were going to be rammed, and I thought we were going to get shot and be killed.&rdquo;</p><p>&ldquo;Just before the interview ended,&rdquo; the magazine continued, &ldquo;Brelo added a possible explanation for why he might have been on the Malibu&rsquo;s hood. &lsquo;In Marine Corps training, they always teach you to elevate, and if a target is threatening you, you go through the target,&rsquo; Brelo said. &lsquo;In my training, you were supposed to push through the target.&rsquo;&rdquo;</p><p id="175">
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Old 05-26-2015, 08:41 AM   #4834
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens.</p><p>
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</p><p>An anonymous study conducted by Professor Leanor Boulin-Johnson of Arizona State University,<br />40 percent of police officers openly admitted to committing domestic violence against their spouse or children in the past 6 months.&nbsp;</p><p id="144">
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Old 05-26-2015, 09:02 AM   #4835
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens&nbsp;getting pulled in different directions by multiple officers in order to escalate the situation and cause&nbsp;&quot;resisting&quot; so they could use force and ruin this guys basketball career after breaking his fibula with a baton.</p><p>Thabo Sefolosha -- NEW Video of Arrest ... NYPD Officer Swung Baton | TMZ.com</p><p>
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</p><p>Atlanta Hawks&nbsp;star&nbsp;Thabo Sefolosha&nbsp;appeared to suffer a severe blow from an NYPD officer's nightstick during his arrest Wednesday night ... based on this new video of the violent take down.</p><p>TMZ Sports&nbsp;just obtained this new angle of Sefolosha's arrest, shot by a witness outside 1Oak Nightclub in NYC ... moments after Pacers&nbsp;Chris Copeland&nbsp;was stabbed.</p><p>In this video you can clearly see Sefolosha being tugged in different directions by 6 officers. Additionally ... you can see one of the officers take a big swing with his baton, and it sounds like he makes contact with something.</p><p>A witness says Thabo told police, &quot;Calm down.&quot;</p><p>As we've reported ... Sefolosha broke his fibula during the scuffle with cops, and based on this video it's possible it could've been caused by the officer's baton.</p><p>In their report, police said Thabo was aggressively charging at one of the officers before they got physical with him. That's not evident from either video we've obtained ... since they start after the scuffle began.</p><p>Thabo is out for the remainder of the season ... due to the injury. He was arrested for obstruction, but plans to fight the charges.&nbsp;</p><p id="376">
</p><p>video in link.</p>
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Old 05-26-2015, 09:03 AM   #4836
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens.</p><p>County sheriff has used stingray over 300 times with no warrant | Ars Technica</p><p>
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</p><p><span style="color:rgb(38, 48, 52)">The sheriff in San Bernardino County&mdash;east of Los Angeles County&mdash;has deployed a stingray hundreds of times without a warrant, and under questionable judicial authority.</span></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>In response to a public records request, the San Bernardino Sheriff&rsquo;s Department (SBSD) sent Ars, among other outlets, a&nbsp;rare example of a template&nbsp;for a &quot;pen register and trap and trace order&quot; application. (In the letter, county lawyers&nbsp;claimed&nbsp;this was a warrant application template, when it clearly is not.) The SBSD is the law enforcement agency for the entire county, the 12th-most populous county in the United States, and the fifth-most populous in California.</p><p>Stingrays, or cell-site simulators, can be&nbsp;used to determine location by spoofing a cell tower, but they can also be used to intercept calls and text messages. Once deployed, the devices&nbsp;intercept data from a target phone&nbsp;as well as information from other phones within the vicinity. For years, federal and local law enforcement have tried to keep their existence a secret while simultaneously&nbsp;upgrading their capabilities. Over the last year, as the devices have&nbsp;become&nbsp;scrutinized, new information about the secretive devices has&nbsp;been revealed.</p><p>This template application, surprisingly, cites no legal authority on which to base its activities. The SBSD did not respond to Ars&rsquo; request for comment.</p><p>&quot;This is astonishing because it suggests the absence of legal authorization (because if there were clear legal authorization you can bet the government would be citing it),&quot;&nbsp;Fred Cate, a law professor at Indiana University, told Ars by e-mail.</p><p>&quot;Alternatively, it might suggest that the government just doesn&rsquo;t care about legal authorization. Either interpretation is profoundly troubling,&quot; he said.</p><p>The&nbsp;documents&nbsp;sent to Ars by the SBSD's county attorneys also show that since acquiring a stingray in late 2012, the agency has used it 303 times between January 1, 2014 and May 7, 2015.</p><p id="208">
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Old 05-26-2015, 09:08 AM   #4837
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens.</p><p>
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Old 05-26-2015, 09:10 AM   #4838
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens being underaged and naked.</p><p>Former Denver cop sentenced to probation for child **** - The Denver Post</p><p>
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</p><p>A former Denver police officer was sentenced Thursday<strong> to four years of probation for possession of child pornography.</strong></p><p>Timothy J. Kelley, 50, received a four-year deferred sentence Thursday in Adams County District Court after pleading guilty on April 2 to sexual exploitation of child, a felony, according to court records.</p><p>Kelley, now a registered sex offender, is participating in a group treatment program, said Sue Lindsay, an Adams County District Attorney's spokeswoman.</p><p>An investigation, by the Douglas County Sheriff's Office, began in January 2014.&nbsp;Police served a search warrant on his Westminster home&nbsp;in May and seven child **** videos were found on a computer.</p><p>Kelley, who had been a Denver police officer since 1995, resigned shortly after the department became aware of the investigation. He worked for years as a crime scene investigator, but before his arrest he was a patrol officer in the Montbello neighborhood.</p><p>As part of the deferred sentence Kelley must stay out of trouble for four years, as well as meet probationary requirements, including treatment and counseling. He was ordered to pay fines and fees of $5,638.50, according to court records.</p><p id="170">
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Old 05-26-2015, 09:11 AM   #4839
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens.</p><p><img alt="" src="http://www.copscaughtontape.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/vandalized-sign.jpg" style="height:464px; width:468px" /></p><p>
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</p><p>An internal investigation has been launched after photos surfaced on social media of two Kansas City, Kansas&nbsp;officers posing for photos that some say is offensive.&nbsp;Celeste Lona was watching from her home and saw the officers get out of their patrol car to check on a vandalized stop sign that read &ldquo;Cops STOP murder&rsquo;n.&rdquo; &nbsp;She said she was not sure when the sign was vandalized near Hasbrook Avenue and South 14th Street.</p><p>Kansas City, KS, Police Chief Terry Zeigler said&nbsp;he is aware of the officers&rsquo; actions and has launched an internal investigation into the matter.&nbsp;At first, Lona thought the officers were there to remove the lettering on the sign, but then she saw them pull out their guns and take each other&rsquo;s photos under the sign.&nbsp;Lona said she was shocked and found the officers&rsquo; actions to be offensive. So she took out her phone and took several pictures of the police posing with their guns.&nbsp;&ldquo;I am disappointed, it is unacceptable behavior, and we are investigating the matter,&rdquo; Zeigler said.</p><p>&ldquo;I&rsquo;m so speechless right now. I can&rsquo;t believe this really happened, and I was able to witness it,&rdquo; Lona said. &ldquo;They were just smiling and giggling about it. They both stood there and took pictures &hellip; that was totally unacceptable, very unprofessional actually.&rdquo;&nbsp;Lona said she supports the department and doesn&rsquo;t condone this type of behavior.</p><p>&ldquo;You&rsquo;re just making a mockery of it. Why would you do that?&rdquo; she asked. She added that police officers have interviewed her about the incident.</p><p>The department issued the following statement Sunday night:</p><p>
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</p><p><em>&ldquo;The Kansas City, KS Police Department became aware of the photos depicting officers posing with patrol rifles in front of a stop sign thru social media late yesterday. The photos are disappointing and inappropriate. The Police Department has spent a great deal of time building relationships with the community in order to strengthen the confidence and trust they have our officers.</em></p><p><em>&ldquo;We hope the actions of these two officers will be viewed as poor judgement and will not take away from the good work being done every day by members of the Kansas City, KS Police Department in/with members of our community. The incident is currently under investigation.&rdquo;</em></p><p>
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Old 05-26-2015, 09:14 AM   #4840
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<p>the problem with policing is the citizens.</p><p>WATCH: North Jersey Cop 'Highly Intoxicated' In Mercer County Traffic Stop, But Not Charged | Princeton, NJ Patch</p><p>
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</p><p>&nbsp;North Jersey police sergeant was accused of driving while &ldquo;highly intoxicated&rdquo; in Mercer County in January 2014 - and his behavior was caught on video [see below].</p><p><strong>Even after words were used to describe him as too &ldquo;f----- up&rdquo; to drive, he was released without charges into the custody of&nbsp;Jersey City police, and he remains on the job</strong>, according to nj.com and news12.com.</p><p>The incident was documented in a video and police reports. The video, taken from the dashboard of a Robbinsville police officer, shows one officer telling Sgt. Vincent Corso, the Jersey City cop, that he is too &ldquo;f------ up&rdquo; to drive, according to the reports.</p><p>The release of the video comes after Robert Cowan, a former Jersey City police chief, cited the incident in a civil lawsuit he filed against the city, Mayor Steve Fulop and Public Safety Director James Shea, according to the reports.</p><p>Cowan alleges in his lawsuit that he ordered an investigation into Corso&rsquo;s traffic stop over the objections of Fulop and Shea. The ex-police chief says Fulop tried to conceal the incident involving Corso, a local union official, because he wanted to curry favor with the union in advance of a gubernatorial run in 2017, according to the reports.</p><p>The traffic stop took place on Jan. 30, 2014 at 7:32 p.m. in Robbinsville when Police Officer Shawn Bruton pulled Corso over on Route 130, telling Corso he was speeding and had one headlight out, according to the reports.</p><p>According to the video, Corso told Bruton he was &ldquo;on the job&rdquo; even after Bruton gave him warnings about his behavior.</p><p>&ldquo;Are we OK here?&rdquo; Corso asks at one point.</p><p>&ldquo;Yeah, just sit in your car,&rdquo; Bruton says.</p><p>&ldquo;Do we have a problem?&rdquo; Corso later asks Officer Barbara Borges, who also appears on the scene, according to nj.com.</p><p>&ldquo;Yeah, we do have a problem,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;You&rsquo;re intoxicated and you&rsquo;re driving a motor vehicle.&rdquo;</p><p>Borges said Corso was &ldquo;highly intoxicated&rsquo;&rsquo; in her written police report, and told him he can&rsquo;t drive. Corso said he&rsquo;d walk to his home in Lincroft in Monmouth County, about 45 minutes away, according to the video.</p><p>&ldquo;You are so f------ up right now, you can&rsquo;t even speak right,&rdquo; the officer told him.</p><p>&ldquo;You cannot drive this vehicle from this point, period,&rdquo; the officer also told him. &ldquo;You ain&rsquo;t driving. You get behind that wheel again, I&rsquo;ll lock you up.&rdquo;</p><p id="223">
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