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Old 01-12-2019, 04:58 PM
  #21  
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Progress is good!

Watch out for a couple things on your brake setup...

When I first installed my Wilwood master in conjunction with the big brakes, I did the same and ended up with "less than ideal" hardline routing. I experienced some problems with the fittings staying tight, which I believe was caused by the long, unsupported lines vibrating around under track use. I eventually re-did the lines, and built a bracket to hold the prop valve and T-fitting, and have had zero problems since.



The line to the left front is still not as clean as I would like, but I didn't want to fab a whole new line at the time.

The other issue is the reservoirs on the Wilwood master. I had a mystery leak that drove me crazy for a while, and I finally realized it was the seam where the upper/lower halves of the reservoir were joined. One of my split, but it appeared it was only leaking under high G loading in left turns on the track. I replaced it with a newer style one piece reservoir, which solved the problem. I would have replaced both, but Wilwood was worthless (even their tech line) for part numbers, so I guessed and bought a reservoir from Summit that I figured would fit. It did, so I ordered another and it's waiting as a spare, or the next time I do a fluid flush I'll swap it out.

This pic shows where the reservoir split, and the second shows the two different reservoirs.

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Old 01-13-2019, 05:07 PM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by Roda View Post
Watch out for a couple things on your brake setup...
Thank you Roda.

I really like the way you have your lines routed. I had noticed that some of the fittings were seeping slightly after the initial bleed. I will be sure to revisit the brake lines soon, as it is a safety concern.

May I ask where you found the copper hardlines, or are they custom? Fabricating some sort of bracket to support the lines has been on my to do list for quite awhile now, but always seems to get pushed back due to some other problem cropping up. I will also inspect the reservoir bottle for any signs of splitting at the seam. Do you happen to have the part number for the new style reservoir?

Thanks again for the heads up.
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Old 01-13-2019, 07:03 PM
  #23  
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Thanks.

The new lines are just copper nickel 3/16" bulk brake line from the local NAPA. I used an Eastwood flaring tool to make the lines.

As I noted, I had a hell of a time coming up with part numbers for the Wilwood parts. I ended up ordering this kit from Summit:

Wilwood 260-10500 remote reservoir kit

The included reservoir is a direct replacement for the reservoirs on the 1" master. I believe the part number for the reservoir included is 260-5752, but I have not been able to confirm that. I ordered the kit because the reservoir doesn't come with a cap, and I couldn't determine for sure which cap was correct, even after talking to Wilwood (yes, that was frustrating). I do know the two-piece reservoir uses a different cap.
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Old 01-25-2019, 01:19 PM
  #24  
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1.8 Swap Part III: Wiring

Oh boy was I in over my head.

I have very little knowledge and therefore experience when it comes to wiring, so I am bound to learn something.

I had purchased a MS Labs MS3 Basic many month prior to beginning the swap.



Along with the Megasquirt I also bought a CAN module to accept the digital signal from my wideband. Using the digital signal will greatly reduce signal noise.

Not pictured, AEM X-series wideband gauge.



Luckily for me, Andrew at TrackSpeed was willing to help me crack open the MS case and switch a few jumpers around on the board for various options.

Sequential fuel and variable TPS jumpers added.




Starting with a 1.6 chassis I needed to add a few more sensors along with the swap. Originally the NA6 chassis did not come with variable throttle position, and used a crank angle sensor driven off the exhaust camshaft. I needed to add a cam and crank sensor if I was to control VVT.

Not having any experience wiring anything automotive, I was unsure of the preferred way of connecting two wires. When working with smaller gauge wire in the past, I had always used soldering as a mean to create a solid connection. However it seems in the automotive world, with heat and vibration, crimping is the preferred method. I practiced a few times on spare wire prior to starting on the wiring harness.

To mitigate the amount of errors I could make when wiring , I dissected the engine harness from my NB for the cam and crank sensors, salvaging the greatest length of wire I could manage. I cut the wires for cam and crank from the CAS on the NA, and extended them to the front of the engine. I then split ground and power from the original sensor to each of the new sensors.



Here at the shop we mostly diagnose and repair FD's and have created a robust ignition system for them. My boss helped me construct an IGN-1A harness to adapt to my miata. I measured spark wire lengths and made a set of wires to route the coils in place of my washer bottle.

IGN-1A harness.



Definition of overkill for a 1.8 swapped Miata.



I now needed to find a location for my GM IAT sensor. I wanted to use the K&N intake tube from my NB but it did not have the provisions to mount the sensor.

I took a band saw to the pipe removing the bung securing the stock sensor and ordered a threaded bung from Vibrant. I found a shop nearby willing to TIG a 3/8 NPT bung to the thin aluminum tube.



Using AEM's X-series Wideband controllers required one additional step when compared to the Innovate. Digital signal comes from the blue wire on the gauge and I needed to connect it to serial port 2 on the DB9 connector on the CAN module.

DB9 serial connector.



Wiring the CAN module to the MS Labs supplied options plug. Only four wires needed, power ground and CAN Hi and Lo.

The next step will be the first start but only after quadruple checking my work.

Now to read up on Tuner Studio, and understand the basics of tuning. Will be much easier said then done.

Last edited by Bryan Z.; 01-25-2019 at 02:40 PM.
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Old 01-25-2019, 05:25 PM
  #25  
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FYI, the crimps that you used also act as heat shrink. If you take a heat gun to them they will close up and prevent dirt from getting in there.
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