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Old 08-18-2014, 11:04 AM   #61
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I think the splitters are usually held on at the back by a solid piece of *your choice of material, usually based on welding skill* square stock, with a rod end at the front to fine tune angle (usually just to set it horizontal)


that flap contraption seems like a lot of work to have another mechanical part of the car that can fail, and when it fails it could be potentially catastrophic to the engine. imo.

Sorry I cant tell you how much frontage you need. You will need to figure that out based on the coolers your running and how much cooling they need for their environment. I.e. it was a balmy 14 degrees Celsius here this week in Canada... I don't think you would need much frontage with this cool weather we have been having.

Those bypass valves look cool. Especially when you hear of so many Miata pumps failing it seems from these parts sticking closed. Question though, how do you get the pressure side to go through it? The Miata engines oil pump is an internal galley with the set screw with the ball valve on it that im sure you could plug. This external valve has 3 ports which makes it seem like it would be for a dry sump system.
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Old 08-18-2014, 11:27 AM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Twodoor View Post
And the fact that post turbo EGT's are substantially lower than pre turbo EGT's.

In the cryogenic air separation plant at my job we have what is called the "expander / compressor". Essentially it is a giant turbocharger where the purpose of the turbine end (expander) is to chill the already cold incoming air down to near cryogenic temperatures.

Keith
Wondering about that myself. Innovate gives same minimum distance Post Head for NA, and Post Turbine FI. Seems to me that the distance limit should be less on the turbo. I have to add a bung sometime for tuning and wonder if I should move my standard one higher for quicker response at low flow.

Any thoughts on a safe position with pump gas and no heat sink? I would like to put it just after the segregated waste-gate pipe joins in.
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Old 08-18-2014, 07:28 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by DNMakinson View Post
Wondering about that myself. Innovate gives same minimum distance Post Head for NA, and Post Turbine FI. Seems to me that the distance limit should be less on the turbo. I have to add a bung sometime for tuning and wonder if I should move my standard one higher for quicker response at low flow.

Any thoughts on a safe position with pump gas and no heat sink? I would like to put it just after the segregated waste-gate pipe joins in.
How much more heat sensitive are Innovate sensors compared to the stock narrow band? Most factory turbo cars have the front O2 sensor right at the outlet of the turbo, and they last 100,000+ miles.

Keith
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Old 08-18-2014, 07:37 PM   #64
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The Innovative sensor is the stock O2 sensor on many VW products.
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Old 08-18-2014, 07:59 PM   #65
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I have been led to believe that WB are more heat sensitive than NB.
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Old 08-18-2014, 09:01 PM   #66
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I think the splitters are usually held on at the back by a solid piece of *your choice of material, usually based on welding skill* square stock, with a rod end at the front to fine tune angle (usually just to set it horizontal)

Yeah I think Ill just go with rod ends.


that flap contraption seems like a lot of work to have another mechanical part of the car that can fail, and when it fails it could be potentially catastrophic to the engine. imo.

I intend to use a brake press to bend a part of the ducting channel, so it wont fail, I guess Ill start with a guess and just go from there.

Sorry I cant tell you how much frontage you need. You will need to figure that out based on the coolers your running and how much cooling they need for their environment. I.e. it was a balmy 14 degrees Celsius here this week in Canada... I don't think you would need much frontage with this cool weather we have been having.

Those bypass valves look cool. Especially when you hear of so many Miata pumps failing it seems from these parts sticking closed. Question though, how do you get the pressure side to go through it? The Miata engines oil pump is an internal galley with the set screw with the ball valve on it that im sure you could plug. This external valve has 3 ports which makes it seem like it would be for a dry sump system.
The bypass valve goes inline with the oil cooler/filter relocation hoses after you block the standard oil relief valve. The return from the bypass valve just goes into the sump like an oil return from a turbo. So the option is to return the oil before it has passed the filter and cooler, or send it through just one of those, or send it through both.

Any ideas people?

Cheers,
Dann
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Old 08-19-2014, 10:25 AM   #67
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The Mazdaspeed Protege (FS-DE) guys use oil control units like that more often than BP guys. Might be worth digging around on their forums.
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Old 08-19-2014, 11:02 AM   #68
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I would return it straight to the pan. I would assume that under high RPM, the flow of oil under pressure and the flow of oil going through the bypass might be too much to flow through the cooler and basically be just a bit less than running no relief valve.

That would be my concern anyways. With relief valves you always want to have unrestricted flow leading up to and after the valve.... plumbing the relief into the cooler would add IMO a lot of restriction, especially since your plumbing it into a somewhat pressurized flow path.
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Old 08-19-2014, 02:36 PM   #69
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Oil return from the external regulator goes to the pan!
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Old 08-19-2014, 07:09 PM   #70
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Yes but does the oil flow through the oil cooler or filter before it goes through the valve or not?

Dann
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Old 08-19-2014, 07:25 PM   #71
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Not seeing any previous work. I would put a remote oil filter kit on the block, then send that to an inline oil thermostat, and the thermo on would go to the cooler, the outlet of the cooler and thermo off would go to the regulator, the regulator drain would go to the pan and the regulator output would go to the oil filter, and then the filter output would go back into the block where it should at the remote filter kit. To me that gives you the most accurate pressure control at the engine without making the oil filter explode on cold startup when you try to make completely full pressure in the filter. And then you also cycle more oil through the oil cooler.
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Old 08-19-2014, 09:01 PM   #72
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Basically how I thought too.

Anyone else?
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Old 08-19-2014, 09:57 PM   #73
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I would most likely regulate before the cooler so the cooler doesn't see full pressure? Higher pressure is not good for the cooler IMO.
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Old 08-19-2014, 11:42 PM   #74
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I would most likely regulate before the cooler so the cooler doesn't see full pressure? Higher pressure is not good for the cooler IMO.
Higher pressure makes the cooler cool more oil. More mass flow, its just going to have to be a higher quality cooler. AND honestly once you get up to the oil cooler temperature the oil pressure should have dropped enough to not really use much regulation from the regulator.
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Old 08-20-2014, 04:37 AM   #75
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If that were true we wouldn't have a million solutions for overpressurised oil pump failure.

Dann
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Old 08-20-2014, 08:15 AM   #76
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If that were true we wouldn't have a million solutions for overpressurised oil pump failure.

Dann
we dont. Our pumps fail from the gears breaking or the bypass sticking open which both result in loss of oil pressure.
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Old 08-20-2014, 09:13 AM   #77
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Why do the gears break?
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Old 08-20-2014, 09:25 AM   #78
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Vibration and because they are shitty sintered metal.
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Old 08-20-2014, 11:02 AM   #79
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Why do billet gears break?
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Old 08-20-2014, 11:04 AM   #80
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Why do billet gears break?
They dont, thats why we upgrade to them.
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