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Old 08-10-2009, 12:04 PM   #41
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i made butter last night.
I have made butter before when I was a kid. What a waste of time. No electric, had to crank that thing fovever. OK, it probably wasn't forever but it seemed like it when you are 8 or so.

My wife did make ice cream last night though. I love homemade ice cream.
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Old 08-10-2009, 12:58 PM   #42
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i dont make it by hand! whipped cream I would but I use a stand mixer for both now. so much faster. I made ice cream a while back and it was phenomenal. stand mixer came with an ice cream bowl that works pretty well.
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Old 08-10-2009, 05:28 PM   #43
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Ghetto Fabulous Macaroni- or College Budget Macaroni Casserole-

Make one small box of Kraft Shells and Cheese and add one can of chunk light tuna (be sure to drain the water off). Stir thoroughly. Consume voraciously. If you are serving company, spread macaroni/tuna mixture in a 9x9 Pyrex dish, sprinkle with onion crisps (or funyons if you are nasty) and bake for an additional 15 minutes at 300*. Then offer one third to the guest and eat the rest yourself.

I know some fancy book-learnin' type cookin' too, but this is what I was jonesing for right this second.

EDIT: Y8s- ^ I like volunteer fire departments.
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Old 08-10-2009, 05:35 PM   #44
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Old 08-12-2009, 10:54 PM   #45
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Dinner (excuse horribly crappy decade-old camera phone taken picture):


Venison tenderloin (backstrap) and spinach salad

Recipe used:
Grilled Pork Tenderloin Recipe : Alton Brown : Food Network


Chris
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Old 08-13-2009, 12:00 AM   #46
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<dirty hippie>factory farmed sausage might as well be poison</dirty hippie>

seriously though, we get some buffalo sausage at the farmers market that is to die for. they also recently started selling half-smokes that are phenomenal. find something like that and you'll get more flavor per pound.
For sure.

Made 50 lbs of sausage last Feb; venison, cheese and jalepeņo, and a dry cured hungarian paprika. Combined with the rest of the family we did about 200 lbs of sausage that weekend:



This book has awesome recipes and info on making sausage, bacon, and brining (1 gallon of water, 1 cup kosher salt, 1/2 cup sugar).
Amazon.com: Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing (9780393058291): Michael Ruhlman, Brian Polcyn, Thomas Keller: Books



Chris
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Old 08-13-2009, 01:08 AM   #47
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Thats something I always wanted to try, but never work up the nerve to attempt it. I'm too scared I would ruin it and waste all that hard work close to the end. Did it turn out good?
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Old 08-13-2009, 02:21 AM   #48
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^I'm still a newb, this was my first year doing it. My Uncle let my brother and I hunt there this year and is schooling us on authentic German sausage making (Fredericksburg).

The dry cured hungarian sausage was s'ok, I shoulda used a bigger casing for those. It didn't turn and I haven't made anyone sick, that's the hardest part on a "cold" cure (low heat).

All the others turned out bad ***, the cheese and jalapeno is second to none when grilled. Forgot we also did a Chicken Apple sausage that was great, though we didn't smoke it.

Chris
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Old 08-13-2009, 02:34 AM   #49
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Originally Posted by Miatamaniac92 View Post
^I'm still a newb, this was my first year doing it. My Uncle let my brother and I hunt there this year and is schooling us on authentic German sausage making (Fredericksburg).

The dry cured hungarian sausage was s'ok, I shoulda used a bigger casing for those. It didn't turn and I haven't made anyone sick, that's the hardest part on a "cold" cure (low heat).

All the others turned out bad ***, the cheese and jalapeno is second to none when grilled. Forgot we also did a Chicken Apple sausage that was great, though we didn't smoke it.

Chris
Thanks. I'm gonna have to buy that book and give it a read.
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Old 08-15-2009, 08:42 PM   #50
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Damn. I am FULL! Just made a "spaghetti pie" though it uses no crust, only cheese. I started with my world famous (should be) sauce which consists of tomatoes, bell pepper, banana pepper, onion, mushrooms, sausage and ground beef, along with a little sugar to knock down the acidity, salt, ground black pepper, garlic and a secret mix of spices. I mixed my sauce and noodles together and added about 1 cup of shredded mozzarella to it. Put that mixture into a glass baking dish, and on top of that I added a little grated parmesan. On top of that, pour a mix of 3 eggs and half cup of milk, which will find its way down around the noodles to help solidify it a bit, so its not just loose pasta. Finally, on top of that, put a generous layer of sliced mozzarella and a little more salt and pepper. When its done baking at 350 for about 30 minutes, if there is a little sauce left, pour some over your plated portion. GOOD EATING!
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Old 08-16-2009, 01:45 PM   #51
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My last venture into the kitchen (to produce vice consume) lead to a Vanilla Bean Cheesecake with a hint of citrus...

Tonight will be a lemon pepper / white wine pork loin with saute'ed veggies and wild rice.

- L
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Old 08-16-2009, 04:51 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by Braineack View Post
rachel ray is an illiterate *****, I won't eat the garbage she cooks on TV and I hope the non-tipping bitch dies of gonorrhea in a turkish prison. the stupid ***** is uneducated and it shows when she throws a bunch of piggly-wiggly grocery store overstock bargain rack **** into a sauce pan and call it "food." I don't blame her husband for cheating on her...she certainly drove him to do it. If anything, she should feel fortunate that he didn't **** a rhino or something that would actually be a step up from her cottage cheese cellulite orgy. Yummmmm, I love small curd!!!
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Old 08-16-2009, 05:42 PM   #53
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For sure.

Made 50 lbs of sausage last Feb; venison, cheese and jalepeņo, and a dry cured hungarian paprika. Combined with the rest of the family we did about 200 lbs of sausage that weekend:



This book has awesome recipes and info on making sausage, bacon, and brining (1 gallon of water, 1 cup kosher salt, 1/2 cup sugar).
Amazon.com: Charcuterie: The Craft of Salting, Smoking, and Curing (9780393058291): Michael Ruhlman, Brian Polcyn, Thomas Keller: Books



Chris
damn poles. lol
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Old 08-16-2009, 07:46 PM   #54
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I attempted that shrimp and grits last night, I didn't have all the required special spices but it was interesting. I like to keep things simple and fresh, love homemade salsa, labor intensive but worth it. When I make pasta its cooked perfectly, almost everyone over cooks pasta.Tonight was super simple, grilled fillet mignon and steamed jumbo shrimp with butter salt and pepper. And an ice cold Becks in a frozen mug. Delicious simplicity.
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Old 08-17-2009, 01:42 PM   #55
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damn poles. lol
Half pole, half german mutt. Now I need to learn how to brew some good german Hefe.



As an aside: this is my favorite culinary book right, by a Brit:


Amazon.com: The River Cottage Meat Book (9781580088435): Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall: Books

His recipe for roast Chicken is bad ***.
I brine the chicken for 6-12 hours, rinse and let dry in the fridge for an hour.
Mix crushed garlic, herbs (I like parsley and dill) and pepper in softened (not melted) unsalted butter.
Use your hands and rub the butter mixture all over the chicken and on the inside. I like to put a couple gloves of garlic in the chicken as well.
Roast on on high heat (425-450) for 20 minutes, lower to 350 and add a cup of white wine to the roasting pan (don't wash the butter off the chicken) cook for 20 minutes or until it reaches the temp you want to cook it to.
Let it rest for 10 minutes, pull off the meat and put it in the roasting pan with the juices. Serve from the pan.

Easy and delicious if not the most healthy. I've done 3 chickens like this over the summer. Substituting olive oil for butter and beer for wine was not as impressive.

Chris
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Old 08-17-2009, 01:57 PM   #56
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Default Tuna on the run

OK, made this concoction after being up for seven days straight, mind was a little wiggy at the time. Very popular food when standing watch.

1 can tuna in water
1 bottle of A1 sauce
1 bag of ruffles chips

Drain 1/2 the water
add A1 to taste
dip with chips

sounds nasty but It is delicious!
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Old 08-17-2009, 01:58 PM   #57
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i made chicken salad last night. tarragon is the key.
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Old 08-17-2009, 02:13 PM   #58
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My Spring - Fall grilling usually consists of Korean BBQ (bulgogi and kalbi) and either ribeyes or carved beef tenderloin (aka filet mignon).

For the 'Merican stuff: I dry season the following:

Lawry's Seasoned Salt
McCormick's Garlic w/ Parsley
onion powder
fine cracked pepper

I bring the meats to room temp after I season both sides. Get the grill really hot. Sear both sides, then turn down the grill to med-low. Pull the steaks and let them rest about 5-10 mins to let the juices return (so they don't run out like we all used to do).

For the Korean beef marinade:

1st part:
Kikkoman Soy Sauce
a little water
Sugar (can substitue honey, brown sugar, or soda)

Mix fair amount of soy sauce, teensy bit of water to cut the salt, a fair amount of sugar - whisk and taste. It should be like a watered down, sweet version of soy sauce.

THEN....

add 3 spring onions (green onion) - cut into little circles
3 cloves of garlic minced
1/4 onion, sliced thin


GOOD, but don't kill yourself if you don't have:
-tiny splash of sesame oil (like literally, maybe 10 drops)
-Asian pear OR sweet apple - cut into small pieces. Adds that nice sweet finishing touch to the marinade

If you're doing a quick marinade (less than 4 hours) - add more sugar

Half a day or overnight, don't add too much soy sauce b/c the saltiness will get absorbed in the meat.

CHEAT HINT - there's a Korean seasoning called "Dashida". It's usually in a foil packet near the soy sauce section of an Asian (Korean) grocery store. That can totally substitute the soy sauce and is money. The bad: It's MSG. But it's really, really good.

HINT: Korean bulgogi is often sold at the grocery stores (Korean/Asian) in the freezers. It's a bunch of thin-sliced beef. You'll see ribeye thin sliced ~$2.19 a pound. Yeah, under $3. Look around, b/c sometimes there's more expensive rib eye next to it...just check the per pound price. I pick up these $6 packages that make enough meat for ~6 starving guys (or about 10 Miata owners).
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Old 08-17-2009, 04:15 PM   #59
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Now I need to learn how to brew some good german Hefe.
If you are in Austin, hook up with the Austin Zealots homebrew club. My club in Houston did an annual bus trip and pub crawl to Austin and we'd pick an establishment to meet up with the Zealots for a round or two. I don't know any of them personally but they seemed like a great bunch of folks. Homebrewers are always eager to teach their craft to noobs, who will then brew more beer for the group to consume. Everybody wins.

Last night we had halibut. Seasoned with just a little salt, cracked pepper, and the lightest touch of cayenne to awaken the taste buds. Side of mushroom risotto and fresh asparagus.
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Old 08-17-2009, 04:35 PM   #60
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Originally Posted by Miatamaniac92 View Post
Dinner (excuse horribly crappy decade-old camera phone taken picture):


Venison tenderloin (backstrap) and spinach salad

Recipe used:
Grilled Pork Tenderloin Recipe : Alton Brown : Food Network


Chris

Bah, I'm down to my two last steaks. One more month til deer season, baby!
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