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Old 01-17-2015, 05:13 PM   #41
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Great step in the right direction.
However, the headline is misleading. Holder ended the use of *Federal* laws to justify local police taking assets. AFAIK *all* states have laws that still allow local cops seizing assets. The next step is to undo those.
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Old 01-17-2015, 05:17 PM   #42
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Great step in the right direction.
However, the headline is misleading. Holder ended the use of *Federal* laws to justify local police taking assets. AFAIK *all* states have laws that still allow local cops seizing assets. The next step is to undo those.
But the fed can't undo those. Only the states individually or the US Supreme Court.
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Old 01-27-2015, 12:57 PM   #43
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Old 01-28-2015, 08:13 PM   #44
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Here you go, proof that license plate recognition technology is being used by the DEA to automate asset forfeiture: Feds Have Been Spying On Millions Of Cars In The U.S.


Pretty clever, actually.
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Old 04-02-2015, 10:08 PM   #45
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Old 05-14-2015, 11:18 PM   #46
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IRS Seized $107,000 From Him. He?s Fighting to Get It Back.

Newest Fox News report says $$$$ was returned, but innocent citizen is out lawyer fees.
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Old 11-03-2015, 03:45 PM   #47
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Police are probably the worst being at fidning and/or solving crimes.

Quote:
The story of Bleiwas' radio days begins in 1994 when he purchased from a friend more than 1,000 Motorola portable radios that had been decommissioned by various city agencies and auctioned by the city Department of General Services. The walkie-talkies' crystals, antennas and batteries had been removed and do not broadcast police, fire or ambulance calls, but they are sought after by buffs and collectors of memorabilia.

Last March someone calling himself "PD Collector" responded to Bleiwas' ad on eBay and purchased a radio for $70. That was the end of it, or so Bleiwas thought, until April 7 when his phone rang at 6 a.m. and a sergeant was on the line ordering him to open the front door of his Long Island home.

Nine investigators from IAB, including a deputy inspector, were outside, armed with a search warrant. Bleiwas said he was asked about radios. He immediately volunteered to show them the documentation he had from the auction and his purchase of the radios, but a detective named Leon Lian told him, "That's OK, bring it to court," according to Klein.

More than 200 radios, Bleiwas' cellphone and computer were seized as evidence. Bleiwas was hauled off the First Precinct in lower Manhattan where he was booked on the charge of possession of stolen property.

Klein said the IAB investigators were apparently operating under the assumption that the radios could not be legally sold therefore they must be stolen.

The charge was dismissed in September and Bleiwas had trouble getting his radios returned until he wrote a letter directly to Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, he said.

But that's still not the end of it. Bleiwas has filed a complaint alleging that his wife's diamond earrings, several radios, and a BB gun were missing after IAB searched his home. IAB's Group One, which investigates allegations of misconduct against its own members, is looking into his complaint.

He's also trying to get his security guard license restored — it was canceled as a result of the police fiasco. "It's very upsetting," Bleiwas told the Daily News. "I can't believe that this happened to me. I wasn't doing anything wrong. It's not like I was selling radios to terrorists. They really messed me up."

An NYPD spokesman said Bleiwas was arrested based on a warrant approved by the D.A.'s office and declined to comment on the allegations.
Police destroy lives. that's it. completely innocent peoples lives are completely destroied because police has nothing better to do. all in the name of justice, and they cant even get that right (IQs too low).

Joe Perez condones the destruction of lives and lossof property and wages because he could have maybe been a criminal and probably should have just been shot on site under the suspicion of a crime.
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Old 11-10-2015, 10:59 AM   #48
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Gubbment be stealin' yo ****!




New report: In tough times, police start seizing a lot more stuff from people
By Christopher Ingraham November 10 at 5:00 AM




Recent years have brought public scrutiny on a controversial law enforcement practice known as civil asset forfeiture, which lets police seize and keep cash and property from people who are never convicted -- and in many cases, even charged -- with wrongdoing. But despite a growing public outcry spurred in part by news investigations and congressional hearings, a new report Tuesday from the Institute for Justice, a non-profit civil liberties law firm, finds that the past decade has seen a "meteoric, exponential increase" in the use of the practice.

The government does not measure the number of times per year that assets are seized. But one common measure of the practice is the amount of money in the asset forfeiture funds of the Department of Justice and the U.S. Treasury, the two agencies that typically perform forfeitures at the federal level. In 2008,there were less than $1.5 billion in the combined asset forfeiture funds of the Justice Department and the U.S. Treasury, according to the report. But by 2014, that number had tripled, to roughly $4.5 billion.



In an e-mail, a Justice Department spokesman pointed out that big cases, like the $1.7 billion Bernie Madoff judgment and a $1.2 billion case associated with Toyota, have led to large deposits to forfeiture funds in a single year. It's not possible to determine precisely how much of these deposits have been subsequently released to victims.

The figures above show the size of the funds after deposits and expenditures are accounted for. "In a given year, one or two high-dollar cases may produce unusually large amounts of money—with a portion going back to victims—thereby telling a noisy story of year-to-year activity levels," the report found. The numbers above represent a more stable and accurate account of forfeiture activity, according to the Institute for Justice.

"Even without those major cases, the overall trend is still upward," said report co-author Lisa Knepper.

One possible explanation for the recent rise is that "the years 2008 to 2014 were some lean economic years," said report co-author Dick Carpenter in an interview. "Forfeiture is an attractive way to keep revenue streams flowing when budgets are tight."

Law enforcement officers generally acknowledged this factor, according a Washington Post investigation last year: "All of our home towns are sitting on a tax-liberating gold mine,” Deputy Ron Hain of Kane County, Ill., wrote in a self-published book in 2011.

Critics of the system also say that the increase in forfeiture activity is due largely to the profit motive created by laws which allow police to keep some or all of the assets they seize.

"It’s possible that the spike is due to a growing recognition by law enforcement of the profitability of forfeiture," said Carpenter. He notes that Congress made some attempt to rein in forfeiture abuses with a modest reform bill in 2000. After that, "elected officials stopped paying attention," he said. "The combination of low procedural hurdles, high profit incentive, and meager accountability or oversight created a rich environment for forfeiture activities to flourish."

Civil asset forfeiture "is happening to every day people in every state across the country," the Institute for Justice's Carpenter said. "There are people here in your community to whom this is happening. This is not something isolated happening to drug kingpins and mafiosos."

In one case represented by the Institute, a drug task force seized $11,000 from a college student at an airport because his luggage smelled like marijuana. They lacked evidence to charge him with any crime, but they kept the money and planned to divvy it up between 13 different law enforcement agencies, most of which had nothing to do with the actual seizure of cash.

In another case, the IRS emptied a convenience store owner's bank account because they suspected he was depositing cash in such a way as to avoid reporting requirements for large deposits. He eventually won his money back after a lengthy court fight.

"Once property is seized," the report explains, "owners must navigate a confusing, complex and often expensive legal process to try to win it back." In Illinois, for example, in order to challenge a seizure property owners must pay a bond of up to 10 percent of the property's value. If they lose their challenge, they must pay for the full legal cost of the proceedings. "Even if they win, they lose 10 percent of the bond on top of whatever attorney costs they accrued," the report found.

Profit motive

Like many of the more controversial aspects of the present-day criminal justice system, civil asset forfeiture's roots lie in the war on drugs. In the 1980s, law enforcement officers said they needed a tool to help capture cartel leaders and large-scale drug traffickers, who are difficult to pin criminal cases on. So Congress amended the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act to create the Department of Justice's Asset Forfeiture Fund.

One feature of the fund was that it allowed agencies to keep the cash and property they seized, creating something of a profit incentive. "For the first time, agencies could obtain a financial benefit from the proceeds of forfeited properties, using funds to do everything from purchase vehicles to pay overtime," the report explains. States followed suit by updating their own forfeiture laws.



At the state level there's considerable variation in how much cash and property from seizures law enforcement officers get to keep. In some, like New Mexico and Missouri, 100 percent of seized assets go to state general funds rather than to law enforcement coffers. But in 25 states and at the federal level, police get to keep 100 percent of the assets they seize. "Allowing law enforcement agencies to reap financial benefits from forfeitures encourages the pursuit of property over the impartial administration of justice," the report argues.

Petty crimes

Asset forfeiture's defenders say that the practice is instrumental in dismantling large-scale criminal enterprises. "The Asset Forfeiture Program is a nationwide law enforcement initiative that removes the tools of crime from criminal organizations," wrote the chief of the DOJ's Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Division in 2007. "The stakes are high. The national security and lives of Americans are at risk."

But evidence suggests that forfeiture proceedings are often initiated against small time criminals or people who aren't criminals at all. An American Civil Liberties Union report earlier this year found that the median amount seized in forfeiture actions in Philadelphia amounted to $192. These forfeiture actions were concentrated in the city's poorest neighborhoods, the report found.

And according to the Institute for Justice's report, in most states the typical forfeiture amount is very small. The median forfeiture case in Illinois is worth $530, according to the report. In Tennessee it's $502. In Minnesota, $451. Those are hardly kingpin-level hauls.

One more data point supports this contention: at the federal level, at least, "the vast majority of forfeiture victims are never convicted or charged with a crime," according to Carpenter. Using data obtained via FOIA requests, Carpenter found that 87 percent of federal forfeiture proceedings were civil cases, not criminal ones. "It's troubling that 87% of the time the conviction appears to be irrelevant," said co-author Lisa Knepper.

Defending forfeiture

The Department of Justice, and many law enforcement groups, maintain that civil forfeiture is an important crimefighting tool in cases when a criminal prosecution may not be possible. "The Department proudly recognizes the value and importance of its asset forfeiture program,"according to written testimony presented by the DOJ to Congress earlier this year. "Civil forfeiture enables the government to recover property when criminal prosecution of the possessor of the property may not be appropriate or feasible."

The testimony points to high-profile cases like that of Kenneth Lay, of Enron infamy, who died before he could be criminally sentenced. "Civil forfeiture was the only way to secure millions of dollars of Lay’s assets, which were then used to compensate victims of the Enron fraud," the testimony concludes. The federal government also used civil forfeiture to seize dozens of pit bulls from Michael Vick's dog fighting operation, many of whom were subsequently adopted.

"Appropriate use of asset forfeiture law allows the Justice Department to safeguard the integrity, security, and stability of our nation’s financial system and provides unique means to go after criminal and terrorist organizations, while protecting the civil liberties of all Americans," said Justice Department spokesman Peter Carr in an email. "As we continue our comprehensive review of the asset forfeiture program, we will stay focused on deterring criminal activity, returning the proceeds of crime to victims, and defending the rights of our citizens."

Strengthening safeguards

But critics like the Institute for Justice say that civil rights protections for innocent property owners are not nearly strong enough. At the state and federal levels, for instance, there's little transparency into what types of assets are seized -- or how they're used by law enforcement officers. Few states have any reporting requirements in place. And in most of them, "the quality of the data ranged from useless to pathetic," Carpenter said. "The ability to do any basic or simple analysis to know what is going on is basically impossible."



As part of its report, the Institute issued state-level grades based on a variety of criteria, like the share of forfeited funds that cops get to keep and protections for innocent owners. Most states and the federal government earned a D-. Two states, Massachusetts and North Dakota, earned an F for the incredibly low standard of proof required to forfeit goods there. Only one state, New Mexico, earned above a B+, primarily because of high-profile forfeiture reforms recently passed there.

The Institute for Justice would like to see civil forfeiture abolished completely. "The idea that you can take somebody's property without convicting them should be anathema in our criminal just system. And police shouldn't be able to profit from this," said report co-author Lisa Knepper.

"A law enforcement officer will typically say that this is stuff taken from criminals," Dick Carpenter said. "My response is, how would they know? They don't charge anyone, much less convict them." He points out that no studies have been done to determine the effects of asset forfeiture on crime rates.

"People say this is an essential crimefighting tool but there's no evidence," Carpenter said.

At the federal level, numerous reform efforts are being considered in Congress. The FAIR act, introduced this year with bipartisan support, would increase the burden of proof required in federal cases and direct the Department of Justice to deposit forfeited assets in the Treasury Department's general fund, rather than to law enforcement accounts.

Momentum appears to be on critics' side.

The issue has united organizations on opposite ends of the political spectrum, including the ACLU and the Koch brothers. Even lawmakers who are often skeptical of the need for policing reform, like Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa, have argued that the practice needs to be changed. "Civil asset forfeiture leads government to exceed its just powers over the governed," he said in a statement earlier this year.
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Old 11-10-2015, 11:11 AM   #49
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Amendment IV

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.


Amendment V

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.
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Old 11-10-2015, 12:35 PM   #50
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Frankly, I'm shocked this isn't a bigger issue with people. I guess we've all become drones to the people who we've entrusted our protections to.

I look at 9/11 as a seminal moment where the US citizen has lost the most basic constitutional protections of rights and property. We've been conditioned to dismiss it as a 'price you pay to be protected'.

Vietnam era vets were conditioned to never wear the uniform and likely would never openly discuss/volunteer having served until recently. Now it's de rigueur and people who never served flaunt a Marine sticker on the back window (no haters... I'm a veteran...). Not to start a debate but I see no real difference between the lies of Vietnam and the lies of Iraq.

Police and, to a certain extent, the EMS folks think of themselves as members of a military more so than public employees. All stemming from the 9/11 attacks. IMO

Voters are pissed but frankly don't know who they should be pissed at and we've lost the logical middle of the road thinking that drove things forward.

Weird times...

/endrant

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Old 11-10-2015, 01:22 PM   #51
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Stupidity is rampant. The people get the gov't they deserve.
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Old 11-10-2015, 02:09 PM   #52
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Originally Posted by rleete View Post
Yeah, he's innocent. Because every working stiff keeps nearly 5 grand in cash around the house.
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Stupidity is rampant. The people get the gov't they deserve.
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Old 11-10-2015, 06:41 PM   #53
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I had $15,000 in cash in my house a few weeks ago...
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Old 11-10-2015, 06:52 PM   #54
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I think I have an envelope containing around $5k lying around somewhere in my apartment.

I'd be extremely annoyed if law enforcement came into my apartment and seized it. But my annoyance would be apportioned jointly and severally, with a large part of it directed at myself for whatever behavior of mine caused law enforcement to notice that I exist in the first place.
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Old 11-11-2015, 12:38 PM   #55
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It is common for prepared people to keep a few grand around in case of a hurricane or something interrupting bank access for a couple of weeks.

And, of course, individuals are reluctant to accept checks for used vehicle purchases.
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Old 11-11-2015, 03:23 PM   #56
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I think I have an envelope containing around $5k lying around somewhere in my apartment.

I'd be extremely annoyed if law enforcement came into my apartment and seized it. But my annoyance would be apportioned jointly and severally, with a large part of it directed at myself for whatever behavior of mine caused law enforcement to notice that I exist in the first place.



cat for scale.
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Old 11-11-2015, 05:56 PM   #57
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Yes, I have a stash of emergency cash on hand. It would be pretty irresponsible as a homeowner and father to do otherwise. It's not $15 grand, but it's enough to handle emergencies. That said, it's not just laying around, and it would take more than a casual search to find it. I think it's safe to say it would be downright difficult for even cops to find unless they knew where it was.

I have also been arrested a few times. Probably a little more than the average for a young white male. Trespassing, assault (bar fight), DUI, and even once for indecent exposure (long story, false arrest, charges dropped). I have never been beaten, manhandled, or even spoken to impolitely. I was even carrying weed and a pipe the first time (hey, it was the mid 1970's). My car or home has never been searched, and I haven't had any no-knock raids.

Are police departments abusing civil asset forfeiture? I have no doubt many are. Are cops using more force than necessary to arrest people? Obviously. But there are ways to reduce the chances it happens to you, and I'd be willing to be a lot of these victims are not using common sense in dealing with authorities.
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Old 11-11-2015, 06:24 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by rleete View Post
Are cops using more force than necessary to arrest people? Obviously. But there are ways to reduce the chances it happens to you, and I'd be willing to be a lot of these victims are not using common sense in dealing with authorities.
Don't let Braineack hear you say that. He'll call you a ***** for not exercising your constitutional right to be a belligerent ******* towards pretty much everyone in a position of authority.

I wonder if Brainey has ever had the pleasure of an all-expenses-paid overnight accommodation at the County Inn? I kind of doubt it.
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Old 11-11-2015, 06:40 PM   #59
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Default Civil Forfeiture seems unfairly administered to me.

I have plenty of personal experience with police. More than anyone should. My favorite was when feds walked into my room and woke me up one nigbt when they were snooping around taking things without a warrant after they told my parents they could do whatever they wanted and we couldn't call our lawyer. The case was thrown out and they were repremanded.

I should post the pics of what the police did last time they raided the house. The term raid is very fitting.
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Old 11-11-2015, 10:03 PM   #60
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Sounds like your reasoning is well founded.

Thankfully, I have never been subject to anything like that.
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