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Old 01-31-2011, 08:24 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by JasonC SBB View Post
Are oil t-stats available in like, 160*F?
Yea the thermostat is a 180 +- 10 so say it has to see 190 before its fully closed. I donít know how much temperature drops across the heater core with the heat off but it wouldnít surprise me if it is 30 or 40 degrees compared to where a standard radiator thermostat and temperature sender is located. So it may not close fully until the engine is hotter than Id like it if it is after the core.

I run a 180 degree main thermostat in the back of the head for the main radiator. With the heater core thermostat placed before the heater core it should start shutting flow down about the same time as the flow starts going to the radiator. when I took the valve apart and fiddled with it I could still blow through it with the path shut so there is always some flow going to the heater core just a significantly reduced amount.

So yea I think a 160-170 thermostat placed after the heater core would be better. The only thing I have found so far is this.
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/EAR-501ERL/
I think some OEMís BMW? are setup this way I wonder what there heater thermostats look like.

Bob
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Old 02-01-2011, 03:52 AM   #22
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Bob, your bay looks amazing.
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Old 02-01-2011, 10:50 AM   #23
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I am convinced It improves peak heat rejection capability for the cooling system.
I am pretty sure that copper is better for thermal transfer.
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Old 02-01-2011, 11:48 AM   #24
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Indeed, copper has a significantly greater thermal conductivity per surface area.

But you've completely missed the point.
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Old 02-01-2011, 03:31 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbundy View Post

So yea I think a 160-170 thermostat placed after the heater core would be better. The only thing I have found so far is this.
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/EAR-501ERL/
I think some OEM’s BMW? are setup this way I wonder what there heater thermostats look like.

Bob
Here is one kinda bad picture of it.



Trying to find another.

Edit: After a bit of reading it looks like they implemented that back in the 80s as a recall to try and eliminate some coolant system over pressurization that was causing heater cores to explode and scalding drivers' legs.
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Old 02-01-2011, 06:59 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by wayne_curr View Post
Here is one kinda bad picture of it.



Trying to find another.

Edit: After a bit of reading it looks like they implemented that back in the 80s as a recall to try and eliminate some coolant system over pressurization that was causing heater cores to explode and scalding drivers' legs.

They also put restrictors into the HC inlet pipes to slow that down. I was talking to our local hotrod radiator shop and they suggested doing that to my stock HC since the OEM Mazda cap was only 13psi, where we have an 18-20psi (can't remember the exact) cap on it now. They said it actually takes very little coolant flow to keep the cabin warm.
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Old 02-01-2011, 11:37 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by chpmnsws6 View Post
They also put restrictors into the HC inlet pipes to slow that down. I was talking to our local hotrod radiator shop and they suggested doing that to my stock HC since the OEM Mazda cap was only 13psi, where we have an 18-20psi (can't remember the exact) cap on it now. They said it actually takes very little coolant flow to keep the cabin warm.
Yea that is my theory that full flow needed to warm things up in the cabin starting from cold. Once the cabin is warm and the engine is warm it dosn't take much flow to keep it that way. Pretty small air space in the cabin of a miata. It also dosn't get very cold in this part of the country. The themostat I am using dosnt close entirely it just reduces flow quite a bit.

Bob
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Old 02-02-2011, 12:57 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by JasonC SBB View Post
Are oil t-stats available in like, 160*F?
Interesting I took the thing apart wondering if I could just find something to replace the wax thingy with and it is stamped 77C / 171F. The wax plug part looks the same shape and dimensions as some other thermostats I got maybe I can just take one out of a 160F standard thermostat.

Maybe it was working correctly with it after the core if it was a 171F stat I just donít know for sure what the temp drop is like across the heater core. That is actually how I had it prior I must say it seemed to work but I didnít record actual data to prove it. I can certainly re plum it back that way again.

Bob
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Old 02-02-2011, 01:13 AM   #29
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They also put restrictors into the HC inlet pipes to slow that down. ... They said it actually takes very little coolant flow to keep the cabin warm.
I kinda disagree, I lived with a 1/4 NPT tap / 1/2" hose in the back of my head as a heater source for a while, and it was a bit wimpy. And I live in CA.
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Old 02-03-2011, 11:30 PM   #30
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Update I found a 160 Motorad thermostat at O-Riley’s had the same wax pellet dimensions as the True Cool oil cooler thermostat.

I put the thermostat assembly in a pot on the stove.

With the 171F pellet it came with it was fully closed at ~195 F
With the 160F pellet it was fully closed at ~175 F.

So if I put this in post core it means it won’t allow much flow through it if the heater core unless it can reject enough heat to get it below 175 F thus somewhat preventing it from possibly being a short circuit of the radiator while still allowing it to resonably function well as a heater when needed for heat.

Any Idea what the temp would typically be at the outlet of the main radiator if say it was 210-220F where it left the head? I havent found where anybody measured it yet. and Im too lazy to measure it myself.

Bob
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Old 02-03-2011, 11:45 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by bbundy View Post
Update I found a 160 Motorad thermostat at O-Riley’s had the same wax pellet dimensions as the True Cool oil cooler thermostat.

I put the thermostat assembly in a pot on the stove.

With the 171F pellet it came with it was fully closed at ~195 F
With the 160F pellet it was fully closed at ~175 F.
LOL you're such a stud...

Quote:
Any Idea what the temp would typically be at the outlet of the main radiator if say it was 210-220F where it left the head?
When the t-stat is wide open, it depends on RPM (and thus water flow rate) and airflow through the rad. Circa 10-15*C drop across the rad at like 50 mph on a steep mt. road doing ~4000 RPM, fans running, on a hot day. At higher RPMs the deltaT will be a bit lower. If the t-stat is partially closed, it'll climb to 30*C delta or more.
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Old 02-04-2011, 04:03 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JasonC SBB View Post
LOL you're such a stud...

When the t-stat is wide open, it depends on RPM (and thus water flow rate) and airflow through the rad. Circa 10-15*C drop across the rad at like 50 mph on a steep mt. road doing ~4000 RPM, fans running, on a hot day. At higher RPMs the deltaT will be a bit lower. If the t-stat is partially closed, it'll climb to 30*C delta or more.
Ok that sounds about right then. With it at coming out of the heater core and headed back to the engine at a regulated maximum of 175F then that path won’t return coolant to the engine any hotter if any than what the radiator will do. Thus the total heat transfer from the radiator and the heater core together should be about maximized.

Important if you want to drive the **** out a car making 3X stock hp and have it maintain temp.

Bob
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Old 02-04-2011, 11:35 AM   #33
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That looks great. How did you connect the AN fitting to the water pipe under the manifold?
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Old 02-04-2011, 11:55 AM   #34
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I'm using a hose barb and hose clamp, but I've drilled and tapped my mixing manifold for a 1/2" NPT. Or 3/8" NPT, I forget. Anyways a NPT to -AN fitting could obviously be screwed in to connect a hose on.
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Old 02-04-2011, 01:40 PM   #35
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That looks great. How did you connect the AN fitting to the water pipe under the manifold?
I welded a steel AN fitting to it.

More bling. note: all the turbo lines are AN fittings. Custom fabricated inlet to the water pump to work with my turbo location. I finished it off to look like it was cast like that.

Bob
Attached Thumbnails
Heater Core Bling-p1010gf01.jpg   Heater Core Bling-p100d007.jpg   Heater Core Bling-wp1.jpg   Heater Core Bling-wp2.jpg  
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Old 02-22-2011, 04:02 AM   #36
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Update,

I changed the installation a bit. Moved the heater thermostat to the other side of the firewall and cleaned up the engine bay. Also have it installed after the heater core with the lower temp wax pellet I ripped out of a different thermostat.

Bob
Attached Thumbnails
Heater Core Bling-p101000d2.jpg   Heater Core Bling-p101000d4.jpg  
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