Another Computer Build Thread - Page 2 - Miata Turbo Forum - Boost cars, acquire cats.

Welcome to Miataturbo.net   Members
 


Gaming Discuss to your nerdy heart's content

Reply
 
 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-23-2012, 10:42 AM   #21
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Home: Hatfield PA, School: Rochester NY
Posts: 52
Total Cats: 0
Default

I'm going to try and pick up one of the 3570Ks you linked above. I should be able to stop at a micro center when I drive home from my coop in 3 weeks. Currently I'm in Alabama, so there's none even remotely close but there's a few on my way home. I don't know if they will still have the deal in 3 weeks though. If not, I'll just pick up an i3 from the egg.

Oh and no offense taken on the laptop cpu upgrade. That's the kind of answer I was looking forward. Definitely something over my head at this point. The memory and SSD should be fine
vpc8728 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 06:42 PM   #22
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Home: Hatfield PA, School: Rochester NY
Posts: 52
Total Cats: 0
Default

If I go with DDR3 memory that is 1333, does it matter if the memory is 10600, 10660, or 10666 for the motherboard I put in the first post?
vpc8728 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 07:16 PM   #23
Boost Pope
iTrader: (8)
 
Joe Perez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Delicious and Moist.
Posts: 26,326
Total Cats: 1,925
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by vpc8728 View Post
If I go with DDR3 memory that is 1333, does it matter if the memory is 10600, 10660, or 10666 for the motherboard I put in the first post?
For all practical purposes, no. And the differences here are exceedingly trivial even by L33T G4M3R standards.

Memory, fortunately, has gotten to a point where pretty much anything is interchangeable with anything else. If it physically fits into the socket, then the RAM and the motherboard will automatically negotiate to operate at whatever speed / timing the two of them can mutually support.
Joe Perez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 09:00 PM   #24
NB/VVT Connoisseur
iTrader: (23)
 
viperormiata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Key West
Posts: 6,072
Total Cats: 253
Default

I'm amazed at how much info/lingo I've picked up from this forum. I actually almost understood 96%-ish of this thread

Nice build OP. Looks like we have somewhat similar goals.
viperormiata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 10:29 PM   #25
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Home: Hatfield PA, School: Rochester NY
Posts: 52
Total Cats: 0
Default

I completely agree viper. I've always been intrigued about building my own computer, but it was your thread that really made me feel like I may be able to actually do it.

In other news my buddy may be able to pick me up one of those 3570Ks from micro center we shall see what happens
vpc8728 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2012, 11:49 PM   #26
Elite Member
iTrader: (2)
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 3,325
Total Cats: 235
Default

Lol and it was your guys threads that helped me realize that my laptop sucks so I just ordered up a bunch of parts for a new build
thenuge26 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 01:21 PM   #27
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Home: Hatfield PA, School: Rochester NY
Posts: 52
Total Cats: 0
Default

I'm leaning more and more towards an i3. Micro Center has the 3220 for $100 and the 3225 for $130. From what I can tell the only difference between the 20 vs. the 25 is the graphics. Is the HD Graphics 4000 worth $30? I would guess for my uses it would not be, but I don't know the difference between 2500 and 4000 graphics
vpc8728 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 02:59 PM   #28
Junior Member
 
718 of 4000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 83
Total Cats: 3
Default

The 2500 HD Graphics should be more than sufficient for the purposes you laid out in the beginning of the thread. I can run 1080p perfectly with the 2000 version on a i3.

For memory, I usually recommend DDR1600 because it usually has the best prices and choices.

Also, MicroCenter usually has decent mobo/CPU combo deals to save you more money.
718 of 4000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 03:03 PM   #29
Junior Member
 
718 of 4000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 83
Total Cats: 3
Default

The 3570K is the Ivy I'm running in the computer I'm currently using to browse mt.net

I have it in a mini-ITX mobo and a mini-ITX case and the heat isn't too much.

It's quite nice, but I bought it because I do a lot of processor intensive data analysis.

For normal web browsing, flash games, 1080p playback, the i3 is more than suitable.

The next generation of processors should be considerably better than the Ivy Bridge, though, but it doesn't sound like you want to wait.
718 of 4000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 03:44 PM   #30
Elite Member
iTrader: (9)
 
Saml01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: NYC
Posts: 5,730
Total Cats: 2
Default

Is it just me? The prices of brand built machines has dropped so much from makers like HP and Dell, it almost makes no sense to DIY an office task machine. The price difference is negligible at best. On the other hand, when buying a dell or hp you get a form factor you wont be able to build yourself and warranty/service that you never have to think about.

If gaming and serious productivity is the objective, self built still reigns supreme.
Saml01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 03:56 PM   #31
Junior Member
 
718 of 4000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 83
Total Cats: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saml01 View Post
Is it just me? The prices of brand built machines has dropped so much from makers like HP and Dell, it almost makes no sense to DIY an office task machine. The price difference is negligible at best. On the other hand, when buying a dell or hp you get a form factor you wont be able to build yourself and warranty/service that you never have to think about.

If gaming and serious productivity is the objective, self built still reigns supreme.
Define "office task machine".

And what do you mean by form factor you can't build yourself?

This is the case for my i5 3570k


Dimensions
14.41" x 7.83" x 11.02"

Two hard drives, optical drive, and dedicated video card

It's tiny.

And I don't know if you've ever had to deal with warranty issues, but they aren't always helpful and extended warranties cost a lot.

Plus component upgrades to any Dell/Lenovo/HP computer are horribly overpriced
Attached Thumbnails
Another Computer Build Thread-oqdmv.png  
718 of 4000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 04:10 PM   #32
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Home: Hatfield PA, School: Rochester NY
Posts: 52
Total Cats: 0
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 718 of 4000 View Post
The next generation of processors should be considerably better than the Ivy Bridge, though, but it doesn't sound like you want to wait.
Seems like your talking about Haswell? Wikipedia says they should be out by June? I doubt I will need any of the new features, but I assume that the introduction of a new architecture will bring a reduction in price of the old architecture? If so that may be worth waiting for
vpc8728 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 04:27 PM   #33
Junior Member
 
718 of 4000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 83
Total Cats: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by vpc8728 View Post
Seems like your talking about Haswell? Wikipedia says they should be out by June? I doubt I will need any of the new features, but I assume that the introduction of a new architecture will bring a reduction in price of the old architecture? If so that may be worth waiting for
Actually, price reduction usually doesn't happen to a great extent.

At MicroCenter, a Sandy Bridge i5 2500k is $160 while the Ivy Bridge i5 3570k is $190.

The new architecture follows a tick-tock-tick-tock pattern, where ticks are small changes and tocks are large changes

The new Ivy Bridge 22nm architecture is a tick whereas the next gen (Haswell) will be a tock (even though it will also be 22nm).

Many believe, and there are numerous articles supporting this, that the Sandy Bridge processors are still quite sufficient for the majority of applications. Especially if you get something like the i5 2500k as it is quad-core.

Haswell should be a nice performance increase as they get more comfortable with the 22nm lithography size and can fit more components on the chip.

But once again, honestly, with your intended uses, an Ivy Bridge i3 or a Sandy Bridge i5 would be quite sufficient and prevent you from spending money unnecessarily.
718 of 4000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 04:27 PM   #34
Boost Pope
iTrader: (8)
 
Joe Perez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Delicious and Moist.
Posts: 26,326
Total Cats: 1,925
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saml01 View Post
Is it just me? The prices of brand built machines has dropped so much from makers like HP and Dell, it almost makes no sense to DIY an office task machine.
It's not just you. My primary office PC is a Lenovo, and all of my PCs in the lab are Dells.

In fact, I probably should have bought an off-the-shelf PC for my media server in the first place. That machine has just been constantly evolving over time. I originally threw it together using 90% spare parts that I already had lying around, and over the years as various parts of it failed due to old age (fried power supply, comatose motherboard, failed HD, etc), I replaced them one by one until I wound up with a totally new machine.
Joe Perez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 04:35 PM   #35
Elite Member
iTrader: (9)
 
Saml01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: NYC
Posts: 5,730
Total Cats: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 718 of 4000 View Post
Define "office task machine".

And what do you mean by form factor you can't build yourself?
This is the case for my i5 3570k
[IMG]https://www.miataturbo.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=58280&dateline=1351104 990[/I

Dimensions
14.41" x 7.83" x 11.02"

Two hard drives, optical drive, and dedicated video card

It's tiny.

And I don't know if you've ever had to deal with warranty issues, but they aren't always helpful and extended warranties cost a lot.

Plus component upgrades to any Dell/Lenovo/HP computer are horribly overpriced
HP Pavilion Slimline s5-1400t Desktop PC | HP® Official Store

15.91 x 4.43 x 12.24 in

You don't need a dedicated video card in a machine that does nothing but email and office. Sure you can get a lo-profile card for a slim box, but then you are building a machine that is neither here nor there.

You can always swap the hard drive or add an additional. Anything above that you can get an external. Nothing else really needs an upgrade as it will not be a limiter to productivity tasks.
Saml01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 04:50 PM   #36
Junior Member
 
718 of 4000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 83
Total Cats: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saml01 View Post
HP Pavilion Slimline s5-1400t Desktop PC | HP® Official Store

15.91 x 4.43 x 12.24 in

You don't need a dedicated video card in a machine that does nothing but email and office. Sure you can get a lo-profile card for a slim box, but then you are building a machine that is neither here nor there.

You can always swap the hard drive or add an additional. Anything above that you can get an external. Nothing else really needs an upgrade as it will not be a limiter to productivity tasks.
You need a dedicated video card if you have a 27" monitor with 2560x1440 resolution

But agreed about the normal job that only requires e-mail and Office.

I just tend to prefer building my computers to my own specifications. I've been doing it since 2005 so I can usually provide my own tech support if needed.

Instead of that HP, why not get a laptop with a docking station? Then you have mobility if needed.

For the processing power of that HP, I think a laptop would be preferable.
718 of 4000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 04:53 PM   #37
Junior Member
 
718 of 4000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 83
Total Cats: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Perez View Post
It's not just you. My primary office PC is a Lenovo, and all of my PCs in the lab are Dells.

In fact, I probably should have bought an off-the-shelf PC for my media server in the first place. That machine has just been constantly evolving over time. I originally threw it together using 90% spare parts that I already had lying around, and over the years as various parts of it failed due to old age (fried power supply, comatose motherboard, failed HD, etc), I replaced them one by one until I wound up with a totally new machine.
Or just bought a NAS for the media server
718 of 4000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 05:28 PM   #38
Boost Pope
iTrader: (8)
 
Joe Perez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Delicious and Moist.
Posts: 26,326
Total Cats: 1,925
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 718 of 4000 View Post
You need a dedicated video card if you have a 27" monitor with 2560x1440 resolution
Ah, for the days when it was actually possible to purchase a monitor with a vertical resolution greater than 1080...


Quote:
Originally Posted by 718 of 4000 View Post
Or just bought a NAS for the media server
In the beginning, the media server was also the playout device. I had a little ATi-brand wireless remote for it and everything. This was ~2004.

I switched to a server-client model when I discovered that the Xbox 360 could stream video over the network, and since it supported component video (which I never got working right with the Radeon card I had) I immediately switched.

Nowadays, with the WD set-top box I have, I could get rid of the PC altogether if I really wanted to get off my *** and relocate my drives into external USB enclosures- just plug 'em directly into the WD box. But the PC itself still has some value, as I occasionally fire it up in NES emulation mode.
Joe Perez is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 10:32 PM   #39
Elite Member
iTrader: (9)
 
Saml01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: NYC
Posts: 5,730
Total Cats: 2
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 718 of 4000 View Post
You need a dedicated video card if you have a 27" monitor with 2560x1440 resolution

But agreed about the normal job that only requires e-mail and Office.

I just tend to prefer building my computers to my own specifications. I've been doing it since 2005 so I can usually provide my own tech support if needed.

Instead of that HP, why not get a laptop with a docking station? Then you have mobility if needed.

For the processing power of that HP, I think a laptop would be preferable.
Incorrect. Intel HD 4000 supports up to 2560x1600.

I see where you are coming from. I have been building PC's since early 2000's for myself and customers. After a while I gave up because of how cheap branded PC's became. Instead of assembling them and trying to compete with HP/Dell, I just consulted and configured them. If someone wanted a performance machine, I built those for less than the competition. The trend continues, a branded office machine is cheaper than self assembled and comes with nifty form factors and cases.

Laptop with dock is an excellent suggestion as well, personally I don't even think a dock is necessary. However, laptops also have a problem. They aren't cheap, overall. Light laptops with performance normally don't come with docks unless you get an expensive IBM. Large desktop replacements have bad battery life and once again, expensive. Even the mid range laptops outpace the price of a slim line PC and will lack in features and expansion.
Saml01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2012, 11:21 PM   #40
Junior Member
 
718 of 4000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 83
Total Cats: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Saml01 View Post
Incorrect. Intel HD 4000 supports up to 2560x1600.
Are you sure? I just tried it and it wouldn't push my 2560x1440.

IIRC, Intel Graphics doesn't support dual-link, so 1920x1200 is the max for DVI and HDMI.

Quote:
Moreover, there are a few limitations in resolutions and monitor connection types. Theoretically, a desktop system on an Ivy Bridge processor can offer three outs: the first one - a universal out (HDMI, DVI, VGA or DisplayPort) with maximum resolution of 1920x1200, the second one – a DisplayPort, HDMI or DVI with up to 1920x1200 resolution, and the third one – a DisplayPort supporting higher resolutions up to 2560x1600. In other words, a popular connection option when WQXGA monitors are connected to Intel HD Graphics 4000 via Dual-Link DVI is still unavailable. However, it supports HDMI protocol version 1.4a, and DisplayPort version 1.1a, which means 3D support in the former case and the ability of the interface to transfer audio stream – in the latter.
So you are correct if you get a monitor with a DisplayPort connection.
718 of 4000 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OTS Bilstein to motorsports ASN conversion stoves Suspension, Brakes, Drivetrain 5 04-21-2016 04:00 PM
WTB MP62 (Hotside) (NB2) Rick02R WTB 3 01-03-2016 08:18 PM
Going back to stock. Need some 1.6 parts. Trent WTB 2 10-01-2015 01:15 PM
Leaky Wilwoods mx592 Suspension, Brakes, Drivetrain 1 10-01-2015 01:45 AM


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:50 PM.